Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Need Help with Recipe page

  1. #1
    Grok's Avatar
    Grok is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    LakeRidge Golf Course
    Posts
    3,682

    Need Help with Recipe

    I'm a total newb to cooking , and I thought I would try to start with something simple like the Mashed Parsnips recipe from Mark's cookbook.

    So I have a couple of questions for this "simple" recipe:
    1. Is chicken broth the same thing as chicken stock?
    1a. I assume I don't want the fat free variety?
    1b. Any particular brand which is good, I picked up a Swansons
    2. Is "cream" the same as "heavy whipping cream"? (Because I went to the store and I could not find anything which just said "cream")
    2a. Do I want the ultra-pasteurized variety? I picked up an organic pasteurized heavy whipping cream in a bottle, hope I bought the right stuff.

    Thanks in advance,
    -Grok

  2. #2
    elorajade's Avatar
    elorajade is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    471
    You want broth. Stock is basically flavored water. Broth has been simmered with bones and meat.

    Ideally, you want to make your own. But, in a pinch, I usually buy organic broth, low sodium if I can get it. To reduce the salt content though, throw in half a potato and it will suck up the salt (then discard).

    The difference between cream/heavy whipping cream is the amount of fat. Cream is anywhere from 13-18% and heavy cream is more like 35%

    You will only find pasteurized in store. That means that its been heated to a certain temperature to kill all the potential germs (and unfortunately the good enzymes and other bacteria that are beneficial to us).

  3. #3
    Grok's Avatar
    Grok is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    LakeRidge Golf Course
    Posts
    3,682
    Okay, I didn't see anything that said "cream". I saw the heavy whipping cream, and some half/half, and milk. I looked in two different stores.

  4. #4
    yaslind's Avatar
    yaslind is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    29
    Heavy whipping cream is just fine.

    I like low sodium Kitchen Basics for my chicken stock. I use it all the time instead of wine to deglaze pans and make quick sauces.

  5. #5
    mayness's Avatar
    mayness is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Central NY
    Posts
    1,046
    Stock and broth are used fairly interchangeably in recipes... I've always heard that "broth" is made without bones, so it doesn't get that thick texture that stock has. I usually use a bouillon powder or a soup base (a thick paste-like stuff in a jar) for convenience, if I haven't made any homemade stock recently.

    At my store there's usually "light cream" and "heavy whipping cream." When a recipe calls for "cream" I don't really know what they mean... I generally use the HWC just because that's all I ever buy. I think the ultra-pasteurized is processed with higher heat but for a shorter time than the normal pasteurized stuff. I've been meaning to do some research to figure out which is better.

  6. #6
    Grok's Avatar
    Grok is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    LakeRidge Golf Course
    Posts
    3,682
    Okay, I've been studying the cook book a little more and in the Enchiladas recipe he calls for "half & half or cream" and the picture shows some half & half. Then in the Creamed Kale recipe he calls for "heavy cream" and shows a picture of a bottle of what looks like the stuff I bought. So I'm guessing for the Mashed Parsnips recipe I should probably use half & half if I can't find cream.

    Thanks for all your help, I think I'm going to try using some half & half for this recipe first.

  7. #7
    Spyhop's Avatar
    Spyhop is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    50
    Quote Originally Posted by elorajade View Post
    You want broth. Stock is basically flavored water. Broth has been simmered with bones and meat.
    See, I was taught that it was the reverse- stock is made with bones and broth is not. Some googling has told me that some people also claim the difference is that stock is unsalted and broth is salted.

    As far as the cream goes, don't worry too hard about it. You could likely sub 1/2 and 1/2 or heavy whipping cream or even whole milk if that was all you had. The recipe wouldn't be identical, but it would probably still taste great.

  8. #8
    elorajade's Avatar
    elorajade is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    471
    LOL!

    Thats why I just make my own when at all possible. When I buy it, it comes in tetra packs and is liquid, broth that is. Yet when I get stock concentrate, its either dry in cubes or a potent liquid.

    Broth via Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broth

    chicken stock http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_stock

    I think Wiki is confused too.

    Although, it has this to say:

    United States cooking schools often differentiate between broth, usually made from portions of animal meat, and stock often made from vegetable scraps and bones.
    6 of 1, half dozen of the other it seems.

  9. #9
    Mermaid's Avatar
    Mermaid is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Virginia and Hawaii
    Posts
    79

    Easy way to make broth

    I think I have avoided Swansons broth in the past because it has MSG. Very unprimal IMO. And lots of people find MSG to be allergy-inducing.

    One good way to make broth is to buy a rotisserie chicken (preferably organic) and then once you've eaten it, put the whole carcass in a pot of water (about 6-8 qts) with some garlic and onion and simmer for a few hours on low. Season with sea salt and pepper if it needs it You can just use big chunks of onions, you don't really have to chop them. When it's done you strain the broth (keeping all the chicken bits that fall off the bone) and divide it into smaller portions to freeze for later use. Then when you get a recipe calling for broth you're good to go!

  10. #10
    Spinner's Avatar
    Spinner is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    182
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    When I make stock, I take the bones of the chicken (or beef bones, like from beef ribs) toss them in the oven and roast them with the veg that I will be putting in the stock. I also save the juices the chicken made as well as the veg I roasted it on. I usually roast the bones/veg for about an hour or so at 350. Dump the whole shooting match in my big stock pot (12 qt, although I would LOVE a 15-20 qt) and cover with water. I leave the skins on the onions and garlic, and the yellow onion skins give the stock a nice color. I add a good glug or 2 of apple cider vinegar and let sit for 1 hour. Bring to a boil and skim skim skim the yuck that comes to the top--and add in a bay leaf or 2, some peppercorns, thyme... I reduce the heat, and let simmer for anywhere from 24-48 hours. When the ends of the bones fall apart when pressed it is done. What that means, is you have gotten all the nutrients you can from the bones. I decant and chill and then package in 1 cup and 1 quart containers. You can, after taking all the solids out, boil the stock to reduce the amount and then it will be just more concentrated.

    I never pick my bones clean, and I usually toss in a package of wings or feet (if I can find them) for the extra cartilage for the gel factor. I never salt the stock/broth until I use it.
    Every day is another stitch in the quilt of life.
    ~*~*~*~*~*~*~
    Re-Start date 6/23/2011
    me--Post pregnancy --mama to a beautiful baby boy--
    273.4/269.3/115
    Hubby--230/227.8/165

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •