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Thread: Discouraged about push-ups page 2

  1. #11
    JoshH's Avatar
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    Hi Alexis,

    If you have access to a gym, the most efficient way to build the strength needed for pushups is to bench press. The advantage of working with a barbell is that you can progress in very small increments on a regular basis, which is simply not possible using your own bodyweight. If you can't lift the weight of an empty barbell, you can use lighter dumbells and progress with them until you can use the bar, and then gradually add weight. If your priority is getting stronger at pushups, I'd bench press every second day doing a couple of warmup sets and then 3 sets of 5 or 6 reps using the heaviest weight you can whilst still maintaining good form. If you don't have a spotter and/or safeties on the bench press, you'll have to use a slightly lighter weight, one you know you can lift for 8 reps but then just do your normal 5 or 6 reps, thus leaving a margin of safety. Progress on that for a couple of months and you'll be doing loads of pushups.

  2. #12
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    JoshH,

    I disagree totally that benching is a good way to work push-ups. Push-ups require total body tension, benching does not, hence the high number of injuries of people who bench. I can't even begin to count the number of people I've known who tore their rotator cuff benching. Can't say I've every met anyone who injured them self doing push-ups.This view is after years of benching and learning for myself. I would challenge any bencher to match my pull up numbers.
    I've known (and been), a 300lb plus bencher, but I have only met 1 or 2 ppl who could routinely pump out sets of 100 push-ups.

  3. #13
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    Thanks for all the suggestions. After reading through these I feel much better and more prepared, I'll try some of these out and see if I can improve substantially in the next month or so. Hopefully I'll be able to get to a point where I can do at least 15 full pushups by the end of the year, which is when my school does those horribly embarrassing public fitness tests everyone cheats at.

  4. #14
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    Mini-mi,

    It might be time to work on your reading comprehension skills mate. The OP asked how she could get her first pushup, as she is currently unable to do any at all. She didn't ask how she could get to sets of 100 pushups, and I didn't suggest she work her bench press to 300lbs and in the process acquire a rotator cuff injury. Try engaging your brain next time you respond to a post.

  5. #15
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    Hey, keep at it. It took a couple months of crossfit before I was able to do a real pushup (with proper form--arms close to the body instead of flared out) on the floor. Now I can do two, maybe three. Haha!

    It is my personal opinion that incline pushups are better than knee pushups. I think incline pushups are more similar to real pushups than knee pushups are. Not sure if this is true, just my opinion.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoshH View Post
    Mini-mi,

    It might be time to work on your reading comprehension skills mate. The OP asked how she could get her first pushup, as she is currently unable to do any at all. She didn't ask how she could get to sets of 100 pushups, and I didn't suggest she work her bench press to 300lbs and in the process acquire a rotator cuff injury. Try engaging your brain next time you respond to a post.
    JoshH,

    Sorry your offended by my response. I am perfectly aware of what the OP posted and her stated goal. Once again you recommended a movement that is performed lying down, while I gave her a resource that enabled me to attain great results in the exact movement she is interested in. Nor did I say that you must work towards a 300 lb bench to acquire a rotator cuff injury. In point of fact, I recommend against benching at any weight because it will result in injury. I've into fitness for over 40 years and done every kind from triathlons to powerlifting so take my advise for what you think it's worth or ignore. Makes no real difference to me

  7. #17
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    a three phase push up is done in three phases

    essentially you start in the push up position, lower your whole body to the floor so that you are lying on your stomach, release your hands and move them like a snow angel then back to the push up position, and push your whole body up like a push up from the floor. You can use your knees to help you if you need.
    Starting waist measurement: 36". Current 35". First Goal 33".
    Starting backsquat: 50lbs. Current squat: 132lbs.

  8. #18
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    Alexis you mentioned you think you're doing your incline push ups wrong? Can you explain? Someone mentioned negatives and they work really well. Work up to being able to count to 30 on the way down to the floor. Start at counting to 5 or 10 and go from there.

    Also if you want to get good at something do it everyday. Heck do it twice a day! Someone on here is going to say OMG!! Twice a day you can't do that! You have no recovery time but the fact is at this level your muscles are already strong enough (unless you are over weight) for you to do a push up but you need to train the central nervous system to adapt to the movement.

    And if you aren't at your goal weight yet, rinse and repeat. These are push ups and twice a day is perfectly fine.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Will View Post
    Alexis you mentioned you think you're doing your incline push ups wrong? Can you explain? Someone mentioned negatives and they work really well. Work up to being able to count to 30 on the way down to the floor. Start at counting to 5 or 10 and go from there.
    I'm not really certain I'm doing the incline push-ups wrong, I just figured that I was since Mark's primal blueprint fitness PDF places incline push-ups as the level after knee push-ups, and I can do 30 incline but only six knee push-ups. The numbers just seem off, that's all. Then again my father says he's always seen incline push-ups as the progression before, not after, knee push-ups.

    I'm going to start doing negatives with counting tomorrow morning. I sometimes do something similar with pull-ups (since I can't do those either yet).

  10. #20
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Have you tried gamer pushups? You are in pushup position, you then go all the way done and allow your body to rest completely on the ground you then once you are ready proceed to do the pushup. I undunderstand these may be tough but it might be enough to make it all the way up as oppsed to fully supporting your body weight for the duration?

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