Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst ... 4567 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 70

Thread: What Were Your Top 5 Newbie Lifter Mistakes? page 6

  1. #51
    diene's Avatar
    diene is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Northeastern U.S.
    Posts
    1,660
    Shop Now
    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post

    OP: My biggest mistake was flaring the elbows too wide and probably in conjunction with a too wide grip on the bench press leading to a complete rupture of a pec tendon. Not fun. Easily enough rectified though. Keep the grip close to shoulders width and the elbow flare to 45 degrees (not 90) to keep the stress off your tendon and ON the muscle. Course this is really only important when getting relatively heavy. I learned the "bodybuilder" bench form at an early age and just never changed it. Bad move.

    Basically any mistake I had EVER is probably form related. Programming can be fixed without catastrophic events. If you work out too much, work out less. If you aren't doing the right combo of exercises .... still fixable. But ill form will kill ya.
    Oh, that sounds painful. I don't think my grip is too wide when I bench, but I'll pay more attention next time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nivanthe View Post

    I lift in Merrells (Vibrams without the toes), but one day if I have extra cash I'd like to pick up some Rogue shoes. I'd also like a pair of real Vibrams, but trying to actually stick to a budget.
    I crossfit in Merrells. I love them. (I have the Mixmaster, which are minimalist trail running shoes.) But even my Merrells have too much of a heel (or so I was told) so I take them off when I squat.

    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    ^ No doubt I hate loungers. If your gonna sit.... make it on one of them open benches in the dumbbell area if nobody is using it.... or grok squat it!! Either way, the only reason you should be resting on your arse is cause your too spent and are unable to actually stand.
    I also stare into space in between sets, but I usually do so on my feet.

  2. #52
    Badkty22's Avatar
    Badkty22 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    177
    Shoes!!! Weightlifting shoes made a huge difference, especially in my squat. You can get a similar effect by putting a small plank of wood under your heels but that probably isn't the safest thing ever. The only wl shoes I've seen available at stores are the Reebok ones, I've seen them at both the Reebok stores/outlets and at Sports Chalet. I've been told that they aren't very good stability-wise though. Otherwise wl shoes are pretty much an online-only deal.

  3. #53
    Dickson's Avatar
    Dickson is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Lombard, IL
    Posts
    92
    Extremely unpopular opinion, but I think you are smart for starting with Stronglifts over Starting Strength. That said, SS is an invaluable learning tool for form.

    My biggest mistake was attacking Starting Strength too hard. I'm one of those people who spends too much time reading and not enough time doing, so I read SS (but didn't understand it) before I stepped foot in a gym. The starting point was too heavy, and making +10lb jumps from the start I quickly found myself trying to grind out weights I couldn't handle. Even with a certified SS coach I injured myself by desperately trying to maintain progress because I wanted to get stronger quickly.

    My advice: Read Starting Strength for technique, but use Stronglifts as a program until you exhaust it. Seriously, if you aren't trying to make your high school football team in 8 weeks the slower pace and extra reps will do wonders for your confidence and form. You are in this game for life, not just trying to see how much weight you can move three months from now.

    After say 12 weeks of 5x5 stronglifts, I personally recommend Wendler's 5/3/1 (rather than the Texas Method). Again, it is a much slower pace but the strength gains can continue for years, plus you can also live a life outside of the main lifts without worrying about burning out or what a poor nights sleep will do to your recovery.

  4. #54
    RichMahogany's Avatar
    RichMahogany is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    6,413
    Quote Originally Posted by Dickson View Post
    My biggest mistake was attacking Starting Strength too hard. I'm one of those people who spends too much time reading and not enough time doing, so I read SS (but didn't understand it) before I stepped foot in a gym. The starting point was too heavy, and making +10lb jumps from the start I quickly found myself trying to grind out weights I couldn't handle. Even with a certified SS coach I injured myself by desperately trying to maintain progress because I wanted to get stronger quickly.
    So you're anti-Starting Strength because you misunderstood/didn't follow it and injured yourself?

  5. #55
    ChaserBD04's Avatar
    ChaserBD04 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    100
    1. Definitely the shoes. I have lifted in the New Balance Minimus (similar to Merrels, Vibrams, etc) and finally buying OLYs worked wonders... That said, I did by the Reebok OLYs, which work great for my purposes. If I get to the point where I have enough money I will probably buy the Rogue ones.

    2. Working from bottom up instead of top down in the oly lifts. Just went through two complimentary seminars on snatch and clean and jerk and began from the hi hang. Working from the hang has been a tremendous skill builder for me.

    3. Not forcing myself to avoid "knees in" on squats in the beginning. Now that I am, I dropped a little weight, but the ease with which I'm moving the weight is completely different.

    4. Letting my little legs dangle during bench press. I'm only 5'1'' so I severely underestimated the value of putting a pair of 45 pound bumpers under my feet to really get those heels down. Instantly upped my bench press. Not a surprise to vetern lifters but to me it was pretty incredible.

    5. Not getting used to hook grip, especially on deadlifts. Now that I use it, it's hard for me to NOT use it. The hook grip has done wonders for me, and I have tiny hands, so no excuses.
    ~All luck is earned in the end.~

  6. #56
    Dickson's Avatar
    Dickson is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Lombard, IL
    Posts
    92
    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    So you're anti-Starting Strength because you misunderstood/didn't follow it and injured yourself?
    I'm not against it, I just think it isn't always the best way to go for all populations. For every person who successfully adds 200+ to their squat with SS, I imagine another four people burn out. The strongest shall survive, and SS is the quickest and most effective way to gain strength. It doesn't mean it is enjoyable, or sets up the person for long-term success in weightlifting.

    I think too many people regret their slow progress, thinking it was a waste, when really it created a foundation for success with SS.

    My injury wasn't relevant to why I think Stronglifts slower approach may be good, I just mentioned that it was a result of my over ambition. I was doing things right (got the shoes, read the book multiple times, got a coach, got my form okay'd on the SS forums 3 seperate times), but the culture for progress let me to push myself keep progressing when less would have been more.

    I see it as any progressive approach can eventually take you to your genetic limit (say 15 years from now). I just found that the slower pace is personally more sustainable, not trying to knock Starting Strength. Also not trying to derail the thread, just giving my personal take on the OP's approach.

  7. #57
    RichMahogany's Avatar
    RichMahogany is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    6,413
    Quote Originally Posted by ChaserBD04 View Post
    1. Definitely the shoes. I have lifted in the New Balance Minimus (similar to Merrels, Vibrams, etc) and finally buying OLYs worked wonders... That said, I did by the Reebok OLYs, which work great for my purposes. If I get to the point where I have enough money I will probably buy the Rogue ones.

    2. Working from bottom up instead of top down in the oly lifts. Just went through two complimentary seminars on snatch and clean and jerk and began from the hi hang. Working from the hang has been a tremendous skill builder for me.

    3. Not forcing myself to avoid "knees in" on squats in the beginning. Now that I am, I dropped a little weight, but the ease with which I'm moving the weight is completely different.

    4. Letting my little legs dangle during bench press. I'm only 5'1'' so I severely underestimated the value of putting a pair of 45 pound bumpers under my feet to really get those heels down. Instantly upped my bench press. Not a surprise to vetern lifters but to me it was pretty incredible.

    5. Not getting used to hook grip, especially on deadlifts. Now that I use it, it's hard for me to NOT use it. The hook grip has done wonders for me, and I have tiny hands, so no excuses.
    Great list!

  8. #58
    sbhikes's Avatar
    sbhikes is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Santa Barbara
    Posts
    8,702
    Well, I did Starting Strength but I didn't "DTFP" in their parlance. I did not:

    - Make the same level of jumps in weight
    - Workout as many times a week
    - Do powercleans
    - Overeat, gain weight
    - Drink a gallon of milk a day
    - Do chinups
    - Always do 3 sets of 5 on my worksets. (Sometimes I do 15 sets of 1.)

    And now I no longer do deadlifts.

    In other words, you can still find some value in Starting Strength even if you don't exactly do the program.

    I can't see what use barbell rows has and I think for me doing 5x5 would be too much volume. That's the only reason I did not follow Stronglifts. That and the Mehdi guy sends me way too much email.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Highest squat: 167.5 x 2. Current Deadlift: 190 x 3

  9. #59
    RedMenace's Avatar
    RedMenace is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    The Emerald City
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by Badkty22 View Post
    Shoes!!! Weightlifting shoes made a huge difference, especially in my squat. You can get a similar effect by putting a small plank of wood under your heels but that probably isn't the safest thing ever. The only wl shoes I've seen available at stores are the Reebok ones, I've seen them at both the Reebok stores/outlets and at Sports Chalet. I've been told that they aren't very good stability-wise though. Otherwise wl shoes are pretty much an online-only deal.
    Oh man. I was not prepared for the cost of shoes. $120 is just not something I can handle at the moment. Perhaps I can save up for them.
    Prions are natures way of telling us that cannibalism is for losers.

    My Primal Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread36522.html

  10. #60
    dilberryhoundog's Avatar
    dilberryhoundog is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    538
    This is my advice.

    There is no finish line, you aren't in a race, getting stronger is a journey with no specific destination.

    In light of this, get to know rest. It is where the magic happens. The weights are just an input, the resting is where you build muscle.

    Many lifters don't rest enough, most lift again after their body has recovered 100% ability, after the soreness passes. But our bodies aren't that dumb, it is evolutionarily smart to recover ability very quickly incase we need to sprint from that lion again tomorrow, our bodies do this fantastically well. So after a massive taxing lift session we "can" be back in the gym a few days later, but.....

    We aren't trying to get back to 100% ability, we want to get "stronger", we are trying to increase our ability. This takes far longer to achieve. We need to sit around at 100% recovered for days waiting for our bodies to get us to 102% recovered (wahoo we're now stronger).

    Our bodies muscle building process takes far longer than its recovery from stress process.

    To simplify; lift big, note recovery time, rest a further amount equal to or longer than recovery time.

    This is how I apply the above insights to my protocol. I do every thing in a day, sprints, big lifts etc. then I sit around all week feeling great waiting, while the magic happens. I could probably tweak it down to fine details but I'm not in a race am I?


    Sent from my iPhone
    A little primal gem - My Success Story
    Weight lost in 4 months - 29kg (64 lbs)

Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst ... 4567 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •