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Thread: How do you NOT graze when you have little kids? page 2

  1. #11
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
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    I totally understand this. When I was a kid, we were permitted snacks up to 2 hours before mealtime. But the snacks were healthy. [And we all had weight problems, so we probably didn't need them, but...]

    I suggest giving the kids snacks that don't require preparation. Keep a bowl of fruit ready to pick from on the counter or in the refrigerator. Keep a plate with cheese cut into bite-sized pieces in the refrigerator, and some peeled hard-boiled eggs, or maybe even sliced cooked meat. Cold cooked potatoes and raw vegetables on another plate. When they want a snack, pull the platter from the refrigerator and let them at it.

    That way the "preparation" won't be constantly on-going for you, but can be consolidated into one chore every few days.

  2. #12
    Leida's Avatar
    Leida is offline Senior Member
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    but in the past children were taught not to eat, nor ask for food, between meals, so they would eat more of the food they were given, and also so they'd learn the two different states of hunger, and satiety.
    I dunno, when I think back, we got up later, had 4 dedicated meals and went to bed earlier. From what I remember of my childhood (vaguely), getting up before 8 am was unusual, breakfast was large (porridge with milk or butter or quark with home made jam or eggs and tea), school started at 8:30-8:45, lunch was at 1 pm from 3 courses (soup, main and dessert drink), then mid-afternoon we ate at ~ 4 either sour cream or sweet fruit drink with something or cheese, and finally dinner was main and tea with something (normally bread and jam). We did not have fruit for much of the year, so preserves were the big thing. I went to bed by 8:30 pm and there was hell to pay for any bathroom trip after that. Adult's working hours were 10 am to 6 pm, iirc, with lunch from 1 to 2 pm.

    Now, my child has to be up at 6:30 am to make the before-school care at 7 am, and she does not go to bed till 8:30-9 pm. So her day is 2 hrs longer than mine. I normally pack a meat item, a vegetable container, 1 fruit and 1 'something else', a larabar or another fruit or an egg. She also eats breakfast and supper. So, that's probably 5 meals. She is fine going for 4-6 hrs, sometimes more without food.
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  3. #13
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leida View Post
    I dunno, when I think back, we got up later, had 4 dedicated meals and went to bed earlier. From what I remember of my childhood (vaguely), getting up before 8 am was unusual, breakfast was large (porridge with milk or butter or quark with home made jam or eggs and tea), school started at 8:30-8:45, lunch was at 1 pm from 3 courses (soup, main and dessert drink), then mid-afternoon we ate at ~ 4 either sour cream or sweet fruit drink with something or cheese, and finally dinner was main and tea with something (normally bread and jam). We did not have fruit for much of the year, so preserves were the big thing. I went to bed by 8:30 pm and there was hell to pay for any bathroom trip after that. Adult's working hours were 10 am to 6 pm, iirc, with lunch from 1 to 2 pm.

    Now, my child has to be up at 6:30 am to make the before-school care at 7 am, and she does not go to bed till 8:30-9 pm. So her day is 2 hrs longer than mine. I normally pack a meat item, a vegetable container, 1 fruit and 1 'something else', a larabar or another fruit or an egg. She also eats breakfast and supper. So, that's probably 5 meals. She is fine going for 4-6 hrs, sometimes more without food.
    When I was a kid in school, we had breakfast, and there was no eating until lunch at school. Nobody snacked, unlike nowadays where it seems like it's up to the teacher to what extent they permit snacking in class—and some permit it constantly at any age. When I got home from school I was permitted to fix myself a snack, but not before dinner, which I often cooked for the family starting in middle school. My older sister was not domestic, and my parents both worked. Dinner always included dessert, and we didn't snack except for maybe a piece of fresh fruit or canned fruit before bedtime.

  4. #14
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    sunnysara is offline Senior Member
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    I hear you! I am trying to IF through breakfast and it is so hard with kiddos! I would NEVER expect a growing child to skip breakfast. My son, especially, wakes up starving in the AM. It is so hard not to take bites of the food out of habit when prepping it... even if I'm not hungry. Especially with all these fresh berries in the summer! I find myself grabbing just a couple and they taste so good that I want a whole handful... and then I may as well eat some sausage + nuts too.

    I have never had food-related will-power issues in my life... until now! It seriously is so hard not to snack when prepping food for someone else. IFing thru the morning was no big deal when I didn't have to think about making a rounded primal meal, touch the food, + cook the food for someone else. I will sometimes make smoothies in the AM with the plan to "save" mine until lunch time at the office... that never happens. But had I not made a smoothie in the first place it would be no big deal. Anyway, no advice for me... just wanted to say I feel your pain!

    I seriously think it may be more appropriate to NOT IF while the kids are young... maybe another method like cutting calories or carbs would be better. I am breast-feeding too but I have a couple pounds around the waist that could go.

  5. #15
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    Neckhammer is online now Senior Member
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    My kids eat 2-3 times a day..... I don't do snacks for them. Sometimes we all skip breakfast together and sometimes they wake up and ask for some food. Breakfast....when they want it is always meat, eggs, and fruit. That will take care of any need for a mid morning snack real quick.

    My kids also survive almost exclusively on meat, eggs, raw milk, fruit, and homemade french fries. They both detest veggies so I don't even bother making them anymore. I always feed them meat/eggs first and they can have as much fruit as they like after OR if they would ever ask for a snack.... which is next to never after the high calorie load of their 2-3 meals.

    Currently they are 3 and 6 years old.

    I remember that breakfast was never a big deal in my childhood. Actually we had one good breakfast a week on sunday when my dad would get up and make everyone omelets with sides of bacon and sausage and of course toast. Other then that breakfast was always take it or leave it.
    Last edited by Neckhammer; 07-31-2013 at 12:22 PM.

  6. #16
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    Unicorn is offline Senior Member
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    I also had that issue previously, and I made it a habit to say 'now is not the time for eating' to myself even when getting the kid snacks. I also took a moment to tune in to my hunger cues. Was I really needing that cheese, or was it just because it was there? It was a gradual process but now I do not feel tempted to snack unless I am really hungry, and then it is dinner time anyway.

    I think each kid is different, and would base the 'need' for snacks on your own kids. Mine need the afternoon snack, but don't need a morning one. We eat dinner a bit later here at 7 pm, so a 4:30 snack prevents everyone from crashing. On the rare days we eat dinner at 5:30-6, no snack is needed.

    Also, what qualifies as a 'snack' is very different here. A half piece of fruit, a small handful of nuts, or a cheese stick is it around here.

    My kids also can get distracted at mealtimes, and do not focus on food the same way adults do. Combine that with a smaller stomach, and you have a kid who crashes in a few hours.

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