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Thread: What makes Deadlifts so fatiguing? page 3

  1. #21
    jackaaron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    Yeah, I deadlift nearly 100 pounds more than I squat. The same weight isn't enough for most people (equipped powerlifters notwithstanding).



    Oh. Are you squatting high? You shouldn't probably do that.

    Regardless, if you gotta drop weight to work on form, drop weight and work on form. Getting hurt is not progress.



    Form is the key, but practicing the form without weight won't necessarily carry over to lifting something that's truly heavy for you. You just gotta find a point where you can lift so much weight safely and progress from there.
    I think part of it is that I am tall and I have NEVER done back exercises only chest arms legs. My lower back strength is absolutely horrid and so is my hand strength.

  2. #22
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    Deadlifts is not the only exercise that can make people extremely fatigued - heavy bent legged good mornings and hyperextensions with a heavy load does much of the same! It's about fatiguing the lower back muscles that stress the CNS and dig hard into the ability of recovery...
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackaaron View Post
    I think part of it is that I am tall and I have NEVER done back exercises only chest arms legs. My lower back strength is absolutely horrid and so is my hand strength.
    I'd still be surprised if the squats aren't high. High-bar or low-bar?

  4. #24
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    Can someone explain to me what 'CNS fatigue' is? Do your nerves get tired and stop firing?

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    Quote Originally Posted by quikky View Post
    Can someone explain to me what 'CNS fatigue' is? Do your nerves get tired and stop firing?
    This is MY general definition: Its the hypothesis that the CNS expends neurotransmitters quicker than the turnover to replace them can be accomplished due to the effort of many muscles working in concert at a high load. Done repeatedly this can create the effect of overtraining with associated symptoms that are quite different from those of peripheral muscle fatigue.

    I didn't google it so there may be some very in depth posts on the subject somewhere though.
    Last edited by Neckhammer; 07-31-2013 at 09:30 AM.

  6. #26
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    Nobody knows the exactly nevro-physiological mecanisms behind CNS fatigue, but we know the symptoms and pretty much what type of stress that causes them. Here some more info:

    A Review of Central Nervous System Fatigue
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  7. #27
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    Seems like a poorly understood subject, this CNS fatigue. If I had to guess, I'd imagine deadlifts wear you out because they're just damn hard. You do hard things and they make you fatigued.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by quikky View Post
    Seems like a poorly understood subject, this CNS fatigue. If I had to guess, I'd imagine deadlifts wear you out because they're just damn hard. You do hard things and they make you fatigued.
    That is fine in a practical sense. Shits hard..... hard stuff can't be done all the time or you get worn out. Makes perfect sense AND you can act on it.

    The whole CNS fatigue thing is definitely less than completely understood. Thats why I called it a hypothesis. Its just that people who train have noticed that there are different types of fatigue and this is one of them. If you check out heart rate variability you will find a whole area focused on maximizing on your rest/work cycles based around CNS fatigue. Interesting stuff, but for the average person here on MDA..... "deadlifts are tough" is probably good enough

  9. #29
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    I'd imagine deadlifts wear you out because they're just damn hard. You do hard things and they make you fatigued.
    They don't *feel* as hard for me as some other exercises. It could be the simplicity- the weight is heavy, but so are squats etc. And the fatigue is less "oh my muscles are tired" and more my brain and self just turning to jelly and needing sleep.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    I definitely think it would be better to give deadlifts their own day. Last time I did them it was after squats and I hurt my back because I didn't realize how wasted I was and lost form half-way through lifting the barbell and my back just came apart, or that's how it felt. Now I have crippling sciatica that isn't going away and only getting worse. If I ever do deadlifts again I will never do them the same day I do squats.
    Could be the very reason that when I go from dead lifts to squats my quads always feel so smoked, but at least I know I'm warmed up!

    Quote Originally Posted by jackaaron View Post
    For me, DLs are so difficult that I occasionally skip them during a week. When I first started, I thought I would just do the same amount of weight as I did for squats...dumb. Anyhow, I've since dramatically reduced weight and focused as hard as I possibly can on keeping a strait back, and my shoulders back. If that's even less weight, that's fine by me.

    Obviously form is key for any exercise, but being out of form for this one is really bad for me. Also, before I do an actual DL, I practice the form like 2-3 times, and I practice it between each set. It's almost like a golf swing that you want to make sure you get right lol.
    Form is critical. It pains me inside to go to a "normal" gym and see so many people making so many mistakes in their form, then head to a HIIT-focused/CrossFit box and see good form. I actually complemented someone today on his overhead squat form because I was proud of him (didn't know him)!

    Regarding form and warming up, I find I have to spend an inordinate among of time before I work heavy squats and dead lifts. I've frequently tried to squat first in my workouts but could never, not without trying, warm up enough to squat without feeling that tight, pulling-of-a muscle sensation. My hamstrings are notorious for being TIGHT and I've just recently discovered that if I warm up dynamically first, then move to dead lifts, I can perform and accomplish what I need to at the squat rack without pain.

    I personally do 8-10 reps with just the bar, add about 10-20 pounds to the bar and repeat, then start increasing my weight more dramatically until I reach my 6-8 range maxes. I may not see as huge gains in my PR's since I use a fair bit of energy warming up, but at least I know I'm fully acclimatized before lifting big and doing the best I can to avoid injury.

    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    Yeah, I deadlift nearly 100 pounds more than I squat. The same weight isn't enough for most people (equipped powerlifters notwithstanding).
    As do I, always have - perhaps something to do with my tight hamstrings.
    Last edited by bemental; 07-31-2013 at 07:40 PM.

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