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    Miguelinileugim's Avatar
    Miguelinileugim is offline Senior Member
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    Question Salt? Really?

    Primal Fuel
    Personally I don't like salt too much, though as far as I've read from the blog it seems that eating two tablespoons of salt might actually be healthier than eating none. Do you agree with that? And if you do, what foods have actually better taste when salted? Meat, veggies, fruit? I've never seen salt as taste-improving.

    Thanks

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    freerangepiglings's Avatar
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    Well I love (good) salt. So I would say practically anything. But the big oneis a green salad, which without the right amount of salt and the perefect dressing, is just all wrong, but with them is perfect.

    And if you don't season your steaks and roast meatS then you're missing all the crispy, salty umami goodness that is the edges of perfectly cooked meats. Yum.

    But I speak as someone who adds salts to (homemade) ice-cream.

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    My mother was from Kentucky and would salt watermelon, which is something quite frequently done in the South. I never was a fan of it, myself. A small pinch of salt in sweets helps to bring out the flavor of the sweet. It sounds counterintuitive, I know. A little bit of salt truly does help to bring out the natural flavor of the food. It also helps dehydrate veggies. If you're making something like an egg plant or zucchini lasagna (using egg plant or zucchini as the "noodle") it helps to salt the veggies first and let them sit for 30 to 45 minutes, then rinse them and then put them in the casserole. I've heard of career sailors putting a pinch of salt in their coffee.

    Your body does need some salt. Sodium levels are one of the standard lab values that doctors look at when patients get blood work done. If you have low levels it can cause problems just as high levels can. Americans as a general rule probably eat too much because processed food is riddled with the stuff. Primal eaters probably have to work a little bit harder to get salt because we tend to not eat processed food.

    If you haven't already, do a taste test with something cooked without salt and something cooked with just a little bit of salt. Use a good sea salt and not the regular "table" salt that you can find. A good sea salt actually has less sodium and is less "salty" tasting, if that makes sense.

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    I'm not a big salt fan either. If something tastes salty, to me, it has too much salt.

    However, salt is good for some things. For example, when you cook veggies or meat, especially in a pan, a little salt helps to sweat the veggies and get some of the fluid out of the meat. This concentrates the flavor of the food.

    Unless you're only buying butter for coffee, go ahead and buy the lightly salted for cooking.

    If you're eating any cured meats or aged cheeses, you're probably getting some sodium there. Olives also have a fairly good sodium content. As does jarred/canned tomato sauce or tomato paste. If you feel good and your weight, bp, etc., are good, I wouldn't worry about turning yourself into a salt freak. It's true that when we stop eating processed foods, we can stop being afraid of the salt shaker, but there's no need to force it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post


    If you're eating any cured meats or aged cheeses, you're probably getting some sodium there. Olives also have a fairly good sodium content. As does jarred/canned tomato sauce or tomato paste. If you feel good and your weight, bp, etc., are good, I wouldn't worry about turning yourself into a salt freak. It's true that when we stop eating processed foods, we can stop being afraid of the salt shaker, but there's no need to force it.
    i buy plain canned san marzano tomatoes, nothing added and eat cured meats only once in a blue moon. grass-fed hard cheese just once or twice per week


    eggs, tomatoes and potatoes are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay better with good salt.


    there is a reason salt was once used as currency -- we would die without sufficient sodium intake.

    if you're flirting with ketosis, sodium intake is especially helpful in balancing electrolytes too.

    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    Ernest Hemingway

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    Romans paid soldiers in salt. (a man worth his salt!) 'Nuff said.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WeldingHank View Post
    Romans paid soldiers in salt. (a man worth his salt!) 'Nuff said.
    yup. the latin word for salt is sal. that is the root for salary.
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    Ernest Hemingway

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    When I was in Spain, I found the food extraordinarily salty.

    I think that there is a range of safe, healthy salt intake. A person can adapt to a lower level, and your taste buds can get used to it and prefer it. Lots of people have forced themselves to eat no salt, thinking it was healthier, and survive, now lecturing others about the virtues of a no salt added diet. But there is still the possibility that under stress conditions like heat and temporary dietary changes someone might need more salt.

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    We need salt, or else suffer serious health problems.

    Shaking up the Salt Myth: The Human Need for Salt
    A Post-Primal PrimalPat

    Do not allow yourself to become wrapped up in a food 'lifestyle'. That is ego, and you are not that.

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    There is not a culture on earth, ancient or modern, that does not consume at least 10 times the amount of salt that is currently recommended by doctors. Clearly we do not understand the role of salt in the body very well if by nature we will consume as much of it as we can.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 175 x 3. Current Deadlift: 225 x 3

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