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  1. #11
    loafingcactus's Avatar
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    I think one problem with saying that salt does not increase blood pressure in other countries is that it just doesn't matter since it does in the USA. Even in people from other countries. One thought is that it has something to do with lifestyle stress, since a particularly confounding difference is found between Africans and similarly situation African Americans.

    If you eat unprocessed foods and don't have even borderline hypertension, I wouldn't worry about adding as much salt as you like. I have hypotension and have to make an effort to add salt. But if you have hypertension, hypertension in the USA is particularly deadly for some reason...and I wouldn't let some rainforest study dissuade you from being concerned about that.

    I realize the OP is from Spain, I have no idea how Spain compares to the USA in the relationship between salt, hypertension and death, but I would assume as a western country it is somewhat similar.
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  2. #12
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    Is Salt Healthy? | Marks Daily Apple

    "Recent evidence suggests that for many people, all out salt reduction has an overall negative impact on several other aspects of health..."

  3. #13
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    There is also a connection between low salt intake and insulin resistance, that is really fascinating, to me at least.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by freerangepiglings View Post
    Well I love (good) salt. So I would say practically anything. But the big oneis a green salad, which without the right amount of salt and the perefect dressing, is just all wrong, but with them is perfect.

    And if you don't season your steaks and roast meatS then you're missing all the crispy, salty umami goodness that is the edges of perfectly cooked meats. Yum.

    But I speak as someone who adds salts to (homemade) ice-cream.
    Mmm... OK, I'll try to add a little salt to my meat salads :)

    Quote Originally Posted by RobinNM View Post
    My mother was from Kentucky and would salt watermelon, which is something quite frequently done in the South. I never was a fan of it, myself. A small pinch of salt in sweets helps to bring out the flavor of the sweet. It sounds counterintuitive, I know. A little bit of salt truly does help to bring out the natural flavor of the food. It also helps dehydrate veggies. If you're making something like an egg plant or zucchini lasagna (using egg plant or zucchini as the "noodle") it helps to salt the veggies first and let them sit for 30 to 45 minutes, then rinse them and then put them in the casserole. I've heard of career sailors putting a pinch of salt in their coffee.

    Your body does need some salt. Sodium levels are one of the standard lab values that doctors look at when patients get blood work done. If you have low levels it can cause problems just as high levels can. Americans as a general rule probably eat too much because processed food is riddled with the stuff. Primal eaters probably have to work a little bit harder to get salt because we tend to not eat processed food.

    If you haven't already, do a taste test with something cooked without salt and something cooked with just a little bit of salt. Use a good sea salt and not the regular "table" salt that you can find. A good sea salt actually has less sodium and is less "salty" tasting, if that makes sense.
    OK, I'll try to add salt to everything, I hope I don't have to regret it! :)

    But what's the difference between sea salt and table salt?

    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post
    I'm not a big salt fan either. If something tastes salty, to me, it has too much salt.

    However, salt is good for some things. For example, when you cook veggies or meat, especially in a pan, a little salt helps to sweat the veggies and get some of the fluid out of the meat. This concentrates the flavor of the food.

    Unless you're only buying butter for coffee, go ahead and buy the lightly salted for cooking.

    If you're eating any cured meats or aged cheeses, you're probably getting some sodium there. Olives also have a fairly good sodium content. As does jarred/canned tomato sauce or tomato paste. If you feel good and your weight, bp, etc., are good, I wouldn't worry about turning yourself into a salt freak. It's true that when we stop eating processed foods, we can stop being afraid of the salt shaker, but there's no need to force it.
    So, salt for meat, OK. Note that I don't eat anything canned but sardines nor cured meats or dairy, but thanks :)

    Quote Originally Posted by noodletoy View Post
    i buy plain canned san marzano tomatoes, nothing added and eat cured meats only once in a blue moon. grass-fed hard cheese just once or twice per week


    eggs, tomatoes and potatoes are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay better with good salt.


    there is a reason salt was once used as currency -- we would die without sufficient sodium intake.

    if you're flirting with ketosis, sodium intake is especially helpful in balancing electrolytes too.

    Got the idea, thanks :)

    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    When I was in Spain, I found the food extraordinarily salty.

    I think that there is a range of safe, healthy salt intake. A person can adapt to a lower level, and your taste buds can get used to it and prefer it. Lots of people have forced themselves to eat no salt, thinking it was healthier, and survive, now lecturing others about the virtues of a no salt added diet. But there is still the possibility that under stress conditions like heat and temporary dietary changes someone might need more salt.
    Really? I though it was only me who didn't like salt at all! :D

    Quote Originally Posted by patski View Post
    We need salt, or else suffer serious health problems.

    Shaking up the Salt Myth: The Human Need for Salt
    I'll read the link, thanks :)

    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    There is not a culture on earth, ancient or modern, that does not consume at least 10 times the amount of salt that is currently recommended by doctors. Clearly we do not understand the role of salt in the body very well if by nature we will consume as much of it as we can.
    Got it :)

    Quote Originally Posted by loafingcactus View Post
    I think one problem with saying that salt does not increase blood pressure in other countries is that it just doesn't matter since it does in the USA. Even in people from other countries. One thought is that it has something to do with lifestyle stress, since a particularly confounding difference is found between Africans and similarly situation African Americans.

    If you eat unprocessed foods and don't have even borderline hypertension, I wouldn't worry about adding as much salt as you like. I have hypotension and have to make an effort to add salt. But if you have hypertension, hypertension in the USA is particularly deadly for some reason...and I wouldn't let some rainforest study dissuade you from being concerned about that.

    I realize the OP is from Spain, I have no idea how Spain compares to the USA in the relationship between salt, hypertension and death, but I would assume as a western country it is somewhat similar.
    Yes, somewhat, we're healthier here (as far as they say). The "spanish paradox" and all that. I'm reading "good calories, bad calories" and apparently salt is not correlated with hypertension as much as they say, that's why I'm asking this :)

    Quote Originally Posted by Goldie View Post
    Is Salt Healthy? | Marks Daily Apple

    "Recent evidence suggests that for many people, all out salt reduction has an overall negative impact on several other aspects of health..."
    (Same as in the book) Thanks :D

  5. #15
    lea's Avatar
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    Salt added at the cooking stage makes just about everything better, even sweets.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miguelinileugim View Post
    Yes, somewhat, we're healthier here (as far as they say). The "spanish paradox" and all that. I'm reading "good calories, bad calories" and apparently salt is not correlated with hypertension as much as they say, that's why I'm asking this
    Yes, it is a very individual thing. The scientific evaluations of public health interventions such as those being attempted in New York are that they may kill more people than they save.
    “In God we trust; all others must bring data.” W. Edwards Deming
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by loafingcactus View Post
    Yes, it is a very individual thing. The scientific evaluations of public health interventions such as those being attempted in New York are that they may kill more people than they save.
    Yes, I try to keep my killing instincts at bay when people "informs" me about nutrition, thank you

  8. #18
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    Where did Grok get salt? IOW, I think it's a personal thing. For me, eating Chinese with soy sauce made my fingers swell the next morning, as did eating sushi, if soy sauce was present. Before primal, even the 100 calorie bags of microwave popcorn had that effect.

    Adding salt is, to me, is no more useful than avoiding it completely. Everyone talks about listening to one's body when it comes to the amount of food to eat. Why would we stop listening when it comes to salt?
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post
    Where did Grok get salt? IOW, I think it's a personal thing. For me, eating Chinese with soy sauce made my fingers swell the next morning, as did eating sushi, if soy sauce was present. Before primal, even the 100 calorie bags of microwave popcorn had that effect.

    Adding salt is, to me, is no more useful than avoiding it completely. Everyone talks about listening to one's body when it comes to the amount of food to eat. Why would we stop listening when it comes to salt?
    I still have to try it with meat, but thanks for the comment

  10. #20
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    Your body requires a continuous, sufficient supply of electrolytes. A standard test for electrolytes includes (with standard ranges):
    SODIUM 135 - 145 mEq/L
    POTASSIUM 3.5 - 5.0 mEq/L
    CHLORIDE 101 - 111 mEq/L
    CO2 21 - 31 mEq/L

    The processed packaged American food in a SAD diet almost always includes salt (sodium). Thus Americans get much more than enough salt in their diet, so much that over time the overload causes hypertension.

    If you're eating PB you must have all (not just the above tested) the required electrolytes. Therefore, adding salt to all cooking water is a good idea. But that probably won't provide enough. Most vitamin/minerals and electrolyte supplements do not include salt, or enough salt, because suppliers expect that you are eating SAD.

    Using a good, liquid electrolyte supplement and adding salt to your food, not in excessive amounts, will keep you healthy.
    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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