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    teach2183's Avatar
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    An Epidemic of Absence

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    Has anyone here read this book? I'm about 2/3 of the way through, and can't help but think the ideas line right up with Primal. The crux of the book so far is that modern civilization is causing us to lose some of the organisms residing in our gut, thus causing inflammation and all kinds of disease. They point to many reasons, from the food we eat, to antibiotics, to the overly cleanliness of society. So I was just wondering if anyone read it and wanted to discuss any of the points made. And if not, perhaps some here would like to read it!

    An Epidemic of Absence: A New Way of Understanding Allergies and Autoimmune Diseases
    By: Moises Velasquez-Manoff

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    peril's Avatar
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    Not too interested in reading the book, but I have bought in fully to the idea. Avoid antibiotics. Eat live food, including ferments. Don't be obsessive about cleaning. Avoid antibacterial cleaners, except bleach in the bathroom
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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    x2, here.
    Historically, I didn't use soap except on fresh cuts and truly rancid things. Otherwise it's a hot rinse until it looks clean, and I use it. But we do have a dishwasher now, so I try to rinse the soap off of my disher before using them. And I eat sauerkraut almost daily and kombucha as each batch is ready. I love bacteria! Haven't tried rotten meat, yet, though. The smell is just too much.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Knifegill View Post
    x2, here.
    Historically, I didn't use soap except on fresh cuts and truly rancid things. Otherwise it's a hot rinse until it looks clean, and I use it. But we do have a dishwasher now, so I try to rinse the soap off of my disher before using them. And I eat sauerkraut almost daily and kombucha as each batch is ready. I love bacteria! Haven't tried rotten meat, yet, though. The smell is just too much.
    Yeah, if you ever want rotten meat, just open our garbage can--BLECH! I'll never forget the time we had maggots growing in it... and how excited you were that you had free fish food *SHUDDER.* Oh no, rotten meat is not for me.

    Oh, and our soap isn't antibacterial, it's just normal soap. It doesn't kill germs, just scrub them off. Much better that way!
    Last edited by Aldergirl; 07-25-2013 at 02:03 AM.

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    MEversbergII's Avatar
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    Thanks for letting me know about this book, I'll see about getting a copy.

    I've often wondered if my stronger than average immune system is the result of a "less than perfectly hygienic" upbringing.

    M.

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    Historically, the absence of appropriate medical treatments and poor hygiene caused early, painful deaths and epidemics of infectious diseases. Historically, humans did not expected to be safe, sound and in perfect health AND look good as they are today. Sure, eating crap food till you burst is not a good idea, neither is over-medicating. But going too far is not a great idea either.
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    teach2183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leida View Post
    Historically, the absence of appropriate medical treatments and poor hygiene caused early, painful deaths and epidemics of infectious diseases. Historically, humans did not expected to be safe, sound and in perfect health AND look good as they are today. Sure, eating crap food till you burst is not a good idea, neither is over-medicating. But going too far is not a great idea either.
    It is clear from your response that you have neither read the book nor have an open mind to this idea, so why respond?

    I finished the book today and it ended with touching on autism and autoimmune diseases, including several anecdotal accounts of ingesting hookworm to relieve symptoms. The premise is that the bodies of people suffering from autoimmune disease and allergies, including depression, have a lot of inflammation. Decreasing inflammation can improve mood and alleviate allergies. The book clearly states that the jury is still out on the long term effects, but advocates being sure you get out into nature and are around animals as much as possible. Perhaps the obesity crisis we're looking at truly is related to the gut flora that we all harbor or do not. That certainly would explain how two people can eat the exact same thing and experience very different results!

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    Genetics, too. Interesting about the hookworms.

    M.

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    love bacteria! Haven't tried rotten meat, yet, though. The smell is just too much.

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    I definitely buy into the dirt-is-good-for-us principle. I had good access to the outdoors growing up and hygiene was mostly restricted to visible dirt. In fact the family attitude to food on the floor was to inspect for obvious fluff and wash under the tap if required, but if it 'looked' clean, then anything else was 'clean dirt' and it would be eaten. But how you'd attribute my generally robust health to that rather than my parents' robust general health, I couldn't say.
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