Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17

Thread: An Epidemic of Absence page 2

  1. #11
    teach2183's Avatar
    teach2183 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Chicago Suburbs
    Posts
    1,057
    Quote Originally Posted by awok677 View Post
    I definitely buy into the dirt-is-good-for-us principle. I had good access to the outdoors growing up and hygiene was mostly restricted to visible dirt. In fact the family attitude to food on the floor was to inspect for obvious fluff and wash under the tap if required, but if it 'looked' clean, then anything else was 'clean dirt' and it would be eaten. But how you'd attribute my generally robust health to that rather than my parents' robust general health, I couldn't say.
    That's actually something the book goes into. It talks a few times about how immigrants' children have very different health due to living conditions being much cleaner.

  2. #12
    70in2012's Avatar
    70in2012 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    396
    Soap is over-rated, especially when bathing!
    Few but ripe.

  3. #13
    MEversbergII's Avatar
    MEversbergII is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lexington Park, MD
    Posts
    1,688
    Quote Originally Posted by Da57vid View Post
    But going too far is not a great idea either.
    Indeed. There's a difference between indifference to dirt and living in one's own feces, as also between being cleanly and mostly sterile.

    M.

  4. #14
    peril's Avatar
    peril is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Sydney, NSW
    Posts
    2,677
    Quote Originally Posted by 70in2012 View Post
    Soap is over-rated, especially when bathing!
    Agree. I use only a washcloth and cold water for my daily shower. No soap, no shampoo. No complaints
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

  5. #15
    MEversbergII's Avatar
    MEversbergII is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lexington Park, MD
    Posts
    1,688
    When one studies history, much thumbs are given over the invention of soap when it comes to personal hygiene. Having cleansed myself without soap many a time, I've often figured it was getting too much credit.

    Not that it is a useless thing - anyone who's worked on mechanical stuff will tell you that pumice soap is probably the greatest invention ever.

    M.

  6. #16
    Jennifla's Avatar
    Jennifla is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    199
    There is a show on Discovery I have started watching called Naked and Afraid. They take a man and woman, strangers to each other but each with survival skills, into a wilderness and chronicle their efforts to survive for 21 days with two modern implements. They usually have a pot and a machete. It is pretty interesting. Naturally, their top goal is usually finding water. (They are given a rudimentary map to accomplish this). In one episode, the couple were on a tropical island and they made do with coconuts. But in every other instance, they not only have to find a source of water but also boil it, even out in the middle of nowhere. It makes me wonder at what point in human history this became necessary. Or is just our first world guts that can't handle wild, raw water?
    As God is my witness, I'll never be hungry again.

  7. #17
    MEversbergII's Avatar
    MEversbergII is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lexington Park, MD
    Posts
    1,688
    PrimalCon New York
    If it's out in the middle of nowhere, without some kind of nasty thing between you and the source, and the water is flowing, I don't think boiling it does anything special.

    If it's stagnant, there's a chance bacteria or other pests have built up in concentration.

    Boiling becomes important when wastes are introduced.

    Protip: If the pool of water is suspiciously devoid of like, algae or whatnot, it's probably poison. High arsenic is common in that case.

    M.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •