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Thread: Electrolyte Replacement page

  1. #1
    Cayenne's Avatar
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    Greetings All:


    Summer training = heavy perspiration.


    Commercial Drinks = Sugary junk.


    Homemade Healthy Primal Recipe = ? ? ?


    Your help = My gratitude : - )


  2. #2
    Wyattlulz's Avatar
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    I see that this is a duplicate topic


  3. #3
    Cayenne's Avatar
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    Yeah, sorry : - (


    I was eager for a reply and didn't know if that would happen in "Nutrition" or "Fitness". There is a "robust" thread in "Fitness."


  4. #4
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    Coconut water.


  5. #5
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    go to a natural health food store and buy some natural salt (that has 50 minerals or more). regular sea salt doesn't count, but celtic sea salt or himalayan salt should be fine.


    mix a pinch of salt with your water. thats all you need to do.


    you only need to replace electrolytes if you're sweating heavily for an hour or more, really. but getting more minerals in your diet from natural salts can't hurt.


  6. #6
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    Sam....


    What "natural salt" has 50 or more minerals in it?


    What is magic about Celtic sea salt? The waters around Ireland are different than the rest of the world? Or, vs. "regular sea salt"? or Himalayan salt?


    Table salt for sodium and salt substitute for potassium. Done. No voodoo needed.


  7. #7
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    OTB, I am sure you didn't mean to come off as callous, but it just seems counterproductive to hurl your opinion in a condescending way without even asking for an explanation.


    Whenever salt was consumed by humans over the thousands of years we have known the substance, it always contained a large set of minerals, usually around 80 or so. These minerals are all vital to our health, as they are absolutely required by our cells to make more cells and operate efficiently. These days, mineral deficiencies are rampant, so quality salt is a good addition to any diet.


    Modern salt took these minerals and refined them such that all that was left was sodium chloride. The overabundance of sodium chloride has been a terrible thing in the Western diet, strongly correlating with high blood pressure and thus a number of health problems.


    I mentioned Celtic and Himalayan salts because they are examples of widely available quality salts.


    I wrote an article about this back in the day. http://newfoodview.wordpress.com/200...eal-with-salt/


  8. #8
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    I know that I come off sounding calloused; it's because I can't stand bad science. And there is so much of it here. Voodoo nutrition religion.


    All the minerals in natural salts don't amount to squat diddly in the amounts needed for our bodies. To use salt as a mineral source would result in huge consumption of the primary ingredient, sodium chloride and we all know what happens if that is done.


    So I tried some internet research on this mater, and I found out the Celtic (registered tradename, nothing to do with waters of origin) has CHARGED minerals. Gimme a break. How does a product uniquely have CHARGED minerals, especially if it is sea salt, which presumably comes from the same seas as all sea salt?


    Himalayan salt is mined salt, just like the commercial stuff out of Louisiana, for instance. Granted, not "refined", but not sea salt, either. I guess it's better because it comes a long way....


    If added salt were a macronutrient, sure, go for it. Can't hurt, might help. But since we shouldn't even be consuming it (like milk), why get into this minutia?


    Per the original question, sea salt has no magic for electrolyte replacement. And in fact, it sucks for potassium, which is one of the two critical minerals excreted during hard exercise.


    Oh, and I guess I missed the news about moderns having mineral deficiencies. And salt is going to correct this alleged catastrophe? I think not.


  9. #9
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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  10. #10
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    Dr. Davis claims that magnesium and iodine are chronically deficient in some parts of America.


    Dr. Davis feel that the demonizing of table salt has lead to a goiter epidemic on parts of the US.


    That said http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtic_Sea_Salt doesn't list iodine and only 20mg/teaspoon of magnesium. So......

    It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

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