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Thread: Can you get strong without deadlift? page 8

  1. #71
    CE402's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    I'm happy to hear someone knows what I went through. I think if I ever deadlift again I will NOT progress like I have been. I will get to a weight that feels fairly challenging and just add reps.

    I honestly believe that all these programs designed with men in mind are just wrong. I feel this intuitively. They just don't work right. I feel intuitively that the weight should not be heavier and heavier all the time. There needs to be more reps. I shouldn't be working right at the edge of failure because failure is instantaneous, no warning. I hurt my back deadlifting 150lbs. The week before I deadlifted 155lbs no problem. I can't be so close to failure if failure is going to come without warning and break my body in half.



    I know this is exactly what happened. I had done several sets at lower weights and two reps at the weight that hurt me, all with perfectly fine form. Then the bad lift happened and it was like my arms were pulled down, my back couldn't hold straightness and it felt like my body just came apart. Why would that happen so suddenly? The other two reps were like eh, no big deal, I can crank out 5 of these no problem. Then boom. Broken body. One thing that really bugs me about lifting weights is how the failures come upon me suddenly without any warning. One rep is strong, the next one fails completely.





    I have not made any progress in presses in several months. Am I still a novice? I remember benching 75 x 5 before Christmas break. I attempted to do it last Monday and failed. Same story with OHP. I deloaded severely after my first back injury and have finally worked back up to almost where I was only to fail again.

    Dillberryhound I disagree with your mix-it-up approach and I know that I am not overtrained. I have felt what overtraining feels like. Mixing it up with variety just for variety's sake isn't going to get you anywhere. You have to have a goal. My goal was to get stronger and become more muscular. The muscular part has been working fairly well. Maybe I just need the more muscular part without the strength.

    I'll just throw this out there as a cautionary tale, call it an n=1 example.

    The only time I've hurt myself deadlifting was when I would go for reps, especially at a weight I could do 10-15 times. Why? Because its still fatiguing, but now you also lose mental focus because it takes so long, and the weight is so light that you stop respecting it.

    I've never hurt myself on a heavy single or double. Of course, after hurting myself a few times, learned to feel when my back starts to round and to quit early. The last time was while doing BBB deads after squats, after taking 15 days off for vacation. Came right back where I left off, and tried to power through 225x5x10

    Second set, on rep seven, going quickly, I felt a sharp pain in my low back, and knew what I'd done.

    I now limit deadlifts to sets of 5-7 so that I do not lose me two focus.

  2. #72
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    Deadlifts are very form/set-up sensitive - at least at weight levels they are useful. You need to be near perfect everytime you pull. With reps, in the sense of bicep curl reps/sets scheme, you run a higher risk of injury.
    It is dangerous to make a "work out" out of DL i.e. sweating, huffing and puffing and the feeling that you "exercised".
    Few but ripe.

  3. #73
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    Steve Maxwell suggests the pistol squat as a suitable substitute. In fatc, he states something like they may be the only lower body exercise you need assuming you are otherwise active/sprinting etc. They can eliminate many bad habits that aklso might have been developed using the dead lift.

  4. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jiggyz View Post
    Steve Maxwell suggests the pistol squat as a suitable substitute. In fatc, he states something like they may be the only lower body exercise you need assuming you are otherwise active/sprinting etc. They can eliminate many bad habits that aklso might have been developed using the dead lift.
    The deadlift makes your back really strong. I fail to see how the pistol squat does the same.

  5. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by quikky View Post
    The deadlift makes your back really strong. I fail to see how the pistol squat does the same.
    Not to mention, if you can't do a pistol squat, what use is it?
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 170 x 3. Current Deadlift: 220 x 3

  6. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by quikky View Post
    The deadlift makes your back really strong. I fail to see how the pistol squat does the same.
    I am just going by what Steve Maxwell said. But I would agree that the pistol does not do the same thing a deadlift does, however, it does work the back if done properly. Also, depends on you definition of really strong. My regimen of pistol squats and other PEMs allows me to be more than strong enough to avoid injury, avoid fatigue, and lift luggage, coolers full of ice, loaded kayaks etc. and various other uneven loads in all kinds of situations.

    The weighted squat and deadlift are simply exercises that I avoid, because of the requirement for excellent technique and the risk of injury if that technique is not almost perfect. I am no powerlifter at all, but neither was grok

  7. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    Not to mention, if you can't do a pistol squat, what use is it?
    This is like a zen koan. I'm clapping for it. With one hand.

  8. #78
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    I don't find weighted squats to be very injury prone. If you can't lift it, you just set the bar on the safety bars and embarrass yourself a little (or a lot depending on how loudly the bar falls on the safeties.)
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 170 x 3. Current Deadlift: 220 x 3

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