Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 56

Thread: Job Advice page 5

  1. #41
    TheFastCat's Avatar
    TheFastCat is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    1,044
    Shop Now
    My 9-5 is writing code; I supplement this with part time coaching jobs coaching oly lifting, crossfit to adults, teens and kids. My 9-5 pays the bills, my coaching fills my need to help others learn and improve. On the side I do technical coding projects to meet my own needs for learning, exploration and improvement. At the gym I work hard to get my physical needs met.

    This is all to say that I don't really allow my work to define my life experience. Sure I spend a lot of time at it, but I don't define my happiness by it. Maybe you could work on transitioning your attentions outside of your 9-5?
    ad astra per aspera

  2. #42
    nikitakolata's Avatar
    nikitakolata is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    267
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFastCat View Post
    This is all to say that I don't really allow my work to define my life experience. Sure I spend a lot of time at it, but I don't define my happiness by it. Maybe you could work on transitioning your attentions outside of your 9-5?
    That is what I have been doing for years. I've been ignoring how hollow and bored I am at work and use whatever spare time I have at work toward my real interests as much as I can. When I'm not at work I am generally pretty happy.

    I was so excited about that jewelry teaching opportunity. Unfortunately, I'm not being considered for the job and I have no idea why. I really hate that; I wish there was some feedback about what I could do to be considered next time... do I need teaching experience? Better jewelry-making skills? A better written cover letter? What?

    I made the mistake of telling my mom about being disappointed and feeling depressed that I'm going to be trapped in compliance hell for the rest of my life because it's the only thing I'm qualified to do. She reponds by saying that everyone hates their job. This bothers me for several reasons... 1. I know it isn't true. 2. Why would knowing someone else is unhappy make me feel better? and 3. I am desperately trying to GET OUT of this career because I hate it. Maybe it makes her feel better to know other people don't like their jobs because she refuses to do anything about it when she doesn't like something in her life (won't leave an unhappy marriage, doesn't look for a new job, won't try a new diet to lose weight, etc.). I am not like that. When I'm not happy with something I try really hard to change it. That's what I'm trying to do about my job right now. My outside of work life is great. Is it horrible to want to enjoy what I do to make money too?

    I am just really ticked off right now. Plus, I know my mom is probably offended because I basically told her what I wrote above minus mentioning that she refuses to do anything about her problems and now she's probably going to be mad/upset. Seriously though, I am sick of that non-advice from people who refuse to do anything to improve their own lives. I am surrounded by way too many people like that, apparently. Sorry, end rant...

  3. #43
    noodletoy's Avatar
    noodletoy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    land of the glass pinecones
    Posts
    2,873
    do you have actual teaching experience? they may have chosen another candidate who does.

    start building up your inventory and get serious about selling your stuff. the more you do it, the more proficient you will get too.
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    Ernest Hemingway

  4. #44
    zoebird's Avatar
    zoebird is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    8,090
    From a business perspective, I would focus on the boutique market. I helped a friend of mine with this.

    She likes to make jewelry from recycled materials. Her stuff is really cool. She would go to craft shows and do an etsy shop. She did ok. But by changing to the boutique market, she really started to do well.

    We identified 4 boutiques in our city that we thought would fit well with the values of what she created. I helped her create a cohesive brand idea, a web site (which focused on the boutique market), and a marketing strategy. We went in and presented her offerings in a seasonal fashion (just how clothing is done), and so we pitched the "Fall" stuff in Spring. She showed the designs, brought her current designs in, and was able to get 3 wholesale deals out of it, with a contract to see the next season.

    We then identified 4 more boutiques in another city. She made arrangements to travel there, and once there, one of the boutiques wanted exclusivity in the market in that city. To do that, she paid a premium on the wholesale goods -- so no other boutiques would offer these pieces. This has become her biggest client.

    We then identified 4 more boutiques in another city, and so on. Each season, she pitches for the next year's opposite season, gets her orders and then sets to manufacturing. She also tries to identify markets for her work.

    This season (right now), so many pieces were ordered from her 8 or so clients that she had to hire a friend to help her manufacture the jewelry. It's looking like this may become a full time position for her friend, while my friend goes and seeks out a few more speciality clients.

    Her goals now are to continue to expand her client base -- moving into the Australian market as well -- and maintain herself and her friend in the business (ie, be able to pay both of them).

    it really made a huge difference in how her jewelry sells, and she no longer does the jewelry stalls or etsy because she makes better bulk sales to these boutiques. And, they value her work, so it's a great relationship.

  5. #45
    nikitakolata's Avatar
    nikitakolata is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    267
    Quote Originally Posted by zoebird View Post
    From a business perspective, I would focus on the boutique market. I helped a friend of mine with this.

    She likes to make jewelry from recycled materials. Her stuff is really cool. She would go to craft shows and do an etsy shop. She did ok. But by changing to the boutique market, she really started to do well.

    We identified 4 boutiques in our city that we thought would fit well with the values of what she created. I helped her create a cohesive brand idea, a web site (which focused on the boutique market), and a marketing strategy. We went in and presented her offerings in a seasonal fashion (just how clothing is done), and so we pitched the "Fall" stuff in Spring. She showed the designs, brought her current designs in, and was able to get 3 wholesale deals out of it, with a contract to see the next season.

    We then identified 4 more boutiques in another city. She made arrangements to travel there, and once there, one of the boutiques wanted exclusivity in the market in that city. To do that, she paid a premium on the wholesale goods -- so no other boutiques would offer these pieces. This has become her biggest client.

    We then identified 4 more boutiques in another city, and so on. Each season, she pitches for the next year's opposite season, gets her orders and then sets to manufacturing. She also tries to identify markets for her work.

    This season (right now), so many pieces were ordered from her 8 or so clients that she had to hire a friend to help her manufacture the jewelry. It's looking like this may become a full time position for her friend, while my friend goes and seeks out a few more speciality clients.

    Her goals now are to continue to expand her client base -- moving into the Australian market as well -- and maintain herself and her friend in the business (ie, be able to pay both of them).

    it really made a huge difference in how her jewelry sells, and she no longer does the jewelry stalls or etsy because she makes better bulk sales to these boutiques. And, they value her work, so it's a great relationship.
    This is my ultimate goal. I live in an area with a lot of boutiques and small stores that I think would be great places to sell my jewelry. The big problem I'm having is making it quickly enough and manufacturing multiples. But, I am working on it. I'm just really not great at wax carving so my progress isn't happening as fast as I'd like. It's good to read a post like this to remind me to keep my eye on my goal, even though it seems so far off right now.

    I swear, I go a little insane at work. I don't know how to explain it. When I'm stuck in that office with nothing to do and no one to talk to my mind just goes to a dark place. I don't handle it very well, I guess. As soon as I'm home I feel so different. I usually have more energy right away (some days/weeks I'm depressed, but not always) and I just feel so much better about life that I think I'd be insane to want to move or change anything major. But, then I go back to the office the next day and repeat the cycle. I really wish they'd just give me a serious amount of work to do! It's amazing that anyone could think I was busy with what I do currently. I ask for work all the time, pretty much from anyone who looks stressed out...

    Anyway, thanks for reminding me to keep my eye on the prize. If you don't mind sharing your friend's website with me, I would love to check it out.

  6. #46
    Ariana30's Avatar
    Ariana30 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    139
    Consider excelling by doing a job you love, thus (theoretically) you will stand apart from others and rise in the field, maybe branching out to own your own company within that field. Sky could be the limit if you if you get to the place you where you have passion.

    I requested a less prestigious position within my organization, but which I knew I would excel. Now I'm completely running things, in my lane, and thriving and en-route to a promotion. I would not have stood apart from my peers in a great way if I did not change jobs. My pay however did not change. For that I am grateful.

  7. #47
    zoebird's Avatar
    zoebird is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    8,090
    So, your main goal is to: 1. upskill; and 2. get a handle on your work-flow needs (how much time you need to create a collection and how many pieces per collection to make).

    Once you have that, then write your business/marketing plan and get rolling. Yes, you can do it around your day job.

  8. #48
    thriveful's Avatar
    thriveful is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    167
    Quote Originally Posted by nikitakolata View Post
    Seriously! I don't understand how I keep finding jobs where I have so little to do. Either the people I have replaced worked REALLY slow or they somehow had friends in the office the would talk to all day. It's strange. I'm an extrovert and I love talking to people, but I just never seem to have anything in common with the people I work with. I make small talk about the weather with the receptionist and a couple people if I happen to pass them in the hall, but it is always short. I have an office in the corner of the building with no one else nearby. Offices on both sides of me are empty. I hate it because it keeps me isolated socially, but I like it because that isolation means leaving early and coming in late go unnoticed.

    I'm going to look into finding a financial planner and trying to stick to a better budget. My husband and I are not short on money and as a result we don't have to consider every purchase like we did 5 years ago. We buy stuff we don't need, that's for sure. I just wish I could pay off the house because then I'd be free...

    Anyway, thank you everyone for the advice. If there's more, keep it coming. I feel a little better today than I did yesterday. Maybe the sale of my company will turn out to be a good thing because it will definitely increase my workload. Considering I played The Sims on my phone for like 5 hours yesterday I certainly have the time to do more work and maybe feeling more productive will leave me feeling more positive in general. I think that's why I like retail jobs; there is always something to do. Plus you're on your feet and talking to people. I'm still going to apply for those jobs and maybe someday I'll format my cover letter just right and get an interview.
    How about downloading a stack of podcasts to your phone, take a docking station into work, and listen to podcasts that interest you whilst u work. I love Robb Wolf, everyday paleo, paleo hacks etc, there are loads.

    At least your time will feel more productive till u make a decision

  9. #49
    zoebird's Avatar
    zoebird is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    8,090
    audio books could be a good idea, as well. you can put them on the iPod, too. people will think you're listening to music while working, etc.

    but, i'm the same way. my mother and I both work about 10 times faster than most of our coworkers. Back when I was in law school, i worked in a law clinic. the secretary once asked me if I felt "overworked" considering how all of us had "so many cases" each -- she told me that the number was 3. All other law clinic folks had 3 cases on their load. I had 7.

    Anyway, i felt like I didn't have enough work, really -- since most of my clinic hours were spent doing my homework for other classes. We had to do 10 hours a week. I finished the work for my 7 cases usually within the first 4 hours (two days). I used to turn in my work right away to run more quickly through the editing cycles, but I realized that's why I kept getting more cases.

    So instead, I used my templates (that makes life a lot easier for a lawyer), then sat on the work until the due date time, and in between, I would do my homework, read books, or write my own stuff.

  10. #50
    JeffC's Avatar
    JeffC is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    VA USA
    Posts
    499
    FWIW, I'm in the tax field so I can relate to the boredom (ever read "The Pale King" by DF Wallace?). Anyway, having worked in house and with the consulting/law firms like E&Y, KPMG, etc., I find that even though I've done the same type of work in house and with a consulting firm, the in house work is far more isolating. It sounds like you work in house so you may be experiencing some of that. It's like being a rock in a library gathering moss. I found it much more collegial in a consulting firm type atmopshere where you are seen as a profit center unlike in house where you are viewed as a cost center to be pared to the bone to save costs. You also may be able to have more part time flexibility with a consulting firm.

    And consider yourself fortunate that you don't have kids. Any idea how many people think like you but cannot switch because they have two kids and a non-working spouse to support? A lot.

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •