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Thread: How can you measure inflammation? page

  1. #1
    miniGrokette's Avatar
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    How can you measure inflammation?

    Can doctors even do this? If they could you would think that everyone would be tested, no? I sometimes have flare ups of dermatitis that don't heal for ages... I always wish I could tell how inflamed I am! haha

    I just realized this shouldn't posted in this section but don't know how to move it.. sorry!
    Last edited by miniGrokette; 07-17-2013 at 09:02 PM.

  2. #2
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    Your cholesterol and liver markers are a standin. If there is a problem there is a whole list of more complicated immune markers that can be tested.

    Dermatitis- you are off wheat, right? There is a whole category of dermatitis that isn't even called dermatitis anymore because it is so strongly related to wheat that it is just part of celiac disease. Also, if this an ongoing thing have you seen a dermatologist? Primary care is notorious for getting these skin diagnoses all wrong.
    “In God we trust; all others must bring data.” W. Edwards Deming
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    Quote Originally Posted by loafingcactus View Post
    Your cholesterol and liver markers are a standin. If there is a problem there is a whole list of more complicated immune markers that can be tested.

    Dermatitis- you are off wheat, right? There is a whole category of dermatitis that isn't even called dermatitis anymore because it is so strongly related to wheat that it is just part of celiac disease. Also, if this an ongoing thing have you seen a dermatologist? Primary care is notorious for getting these skin diagnoses all wrong.
    I have been tested for celiac disease and was negative. I'm off wheat but not dairy. I've been to a dermatologist and they give me Clobex spray, shampoo, foam... you name it. The stuff is strong and I almost never use it. Lately my patches have started showing up skin other than my scalp, and I haven't be able to point to any dietary changes. So frustrating!

  4. #4
    Anna Kurz's Avatar
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    Inflammation responses to foods that we consume, can be measured in two ways - 1) showing weight increases on the scales within 24hours of consuming a food and 2) by way of body reactions such as rashes, aches, pains, sinus, flu like symptons etc.
    For dermatitis reactions, since you have already eliminated wheat, you might like to also try eliminating all nightshade vegetables from your diet such as tomato, capsicum, bell peppers, eggplant - you can google for a whole list of these. Along with this, all dairy is also a known inflammation culprit along with bulb foods such as onions and garlic.
    If you eliminate these foods from your diet, once the dermatitis has settled down, begin introducing one of these foods at a time - note any inflammation reactions - it is a slow process but one that is worth the time and effort with rewarding results

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    loafingcactus's Avatar
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    25% of people who have full blown celiac disease on the intestine biopsy are negative on the best blood tests, so the blood tests for gluten sensitivity aren't all that.

    Since you say diatery changes haven't worked, I assume you tested going off dairy, FODMAPS and all that good stuff.

    I assume you know not to take echinacea or anything that revs up the immune system.

    And that's all I've got. I have a disease that marks my skin, though in a less obvious place than my head, and it tis what it tis alas.
    “In God we trust; all others must bring data.” W. Edwards Deming
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anna Kurz View Post
    Inflammation responses to foods that we consume, can be measured in two ways - 1) showing weight increases on the scales within 24hours of consuming a food and 2) by way of body reactions such as rashes, aches, pains, sinus, flu like symptons etc.
    For dermatitis reactions, since you have already eliminated wheat, you might like to also try eliminating all nightshade vegetables from your diet such as tomato, capsicum, bell peppers, eggplant - you can google for a whole list of these. Along with this, all dairy is also a known inflammation culprit along with bulb foods such as onions and garlic.
    If you eliminate these foods from your diet, once the dermatitis has settled down, begin introducing one of these foods at a time - note any inflammation reactions - it is a slow process but one that is worth the time and effort with rewarding results
    Give up garlic and onion I think I will start with experimenting with my dairy intake and say prayers every night that I can keep my garlic, onion, and tomato. Maybe I should try the Whole30. Giving up dairy is daunting.

  7. #7
    Anna Kurz's Avatar
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    LOL - I know, it does seem daunting but honestly, there are so many fabulous other options out there that you can enjoy - over time you will not miss dairy at all. Homemade almond milk is brilliant as a 'milk' substitute (not store bought as this has too many preservatives, sugars etc). Home made almond milk is full of saturated fat and protein - I add a few fresh dates into mine so that I end up with a sweetened milk. You can heat this and add to a black coffee to make 'latte' - add in raw cacao for a hot chocolate, add to homemade granola, homemade custard etc etc.
    And oh, I know for many it is hard to give up certain foods but truly, if any of these are causing you this grief, you will far enjoy being pain free than ever consuming those foods again.

  8. #8
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    A C-reactive protein blood test measures inflammation.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anna Kurz View Post
    Inflammation responses to foods that we consume, can be measured in two ways - 1) showing weight increases on the scales within 24hours of consuming a food and 2) by way of body reactions such as rashes, aches, pains, sinus, flu like symptons etc.
    I agree with all above. When I eat things that cause inflammation (dairy/eggs) within 24-48hrs I experience all of these symptoms. Weight gain is typically 1-2lbs and I feel extreme fatigue, flu like symptoms, constipated and overall inflamed.I've had my c-reactive protein measured during these 'flare ups' and it has ranged from being positive/neg so to be truthful, I don't trust the blood markers as much as I trust the physical symptoms.

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