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Thread: Runners: Are you fat? page 5

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    It's true that there are some whose appetite does not increase when they exercise more. Most of them seem to be young guys who have never been on a cycle of dieting.
    I cannot agree with this, and there's not sufficient evidence to back this up.

    But what I am saying is that studies show that isn't what happens, and it isn't realistic. The number of people who are able to exert constant willpower and total control for the rest of their lives is vanishingly small, far smaller than the number of those who live with eating disorders.
    What do you mean studies show that isn't what happens? It would be helpful to link the studies that you're referring to, as I'm not quite sure what you're saying here.
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  2. #42
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    I'm not very young or a guy, but if anything my appetite diminishes on days when I run. The only thing that ever made me feel hungry all the time was when I was only eating meats, added fat and leafy vegetables.

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    Even if a single study claimed that running makes us fat, I wouldn't take it for granted...
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  4. #44
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    Caloric deficit, with or without exercise, did not work for me. It depends on if your metabolism is healthy or not, I think. My busted metabolism refused to let go of fat no matter how few calories or how much exercise I did. The rules aren't as black and white as you state, jakejoh.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by heatseeker View Post
    Caloric deficit, with or without exercise, did not work for me. It depends on if your metabolism is healthy or not, I think. My busted metabolism refused to let go of fat no matter how few calories or how much exercise I did. The rules aren't as black and white as you state, jakejoh.
    If you are in a true calorie deficit you'll lose weight by definition, no matter how messed up your metabolism are! Where should the body elsewhere get it's energy from, since it can't assimilate sunshine directly, like the green plants?
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  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by heatseeker View Post
    Caloric deficit, with or without exercise, did not work for me. It depends on if your metabolism is healthy or not, I think. My busted metabolism refused to let go of fat no matter how few calories or how much exercise I did. The rules aren't as black and white as you state, jakejoh.
    If you're metabolism is damaged, that's a different story. I never stated the rules are black and white, metabolism is essentially a moving target. However, saying a caloric deficit did not work for you doesn't say anything against the efficacy of thermodynamics.

    You must be in an energy deficit to lose weight. It's not only about calories in calories out, as metabolism, dietary induced thermogenesis, non exercise activity thermogenesis, etc. all play a role, but, again, you must be in an energy deficit to lose weight.
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  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakejoh10 View Post
    I cannot agree with this, and there's not sufficient evidence to back this up.
    This is my experience, though maybe "young" was not quite right. Guys, absolutely. Evidence is that going on a diet results in a net gain of weight, and the more diets a person goes on, the more weight they gain and the harder they find it to lose. Women diet a lot more than men. Are you really trying to tell me that young guys who have never been overweight have maintained their weight through yoyo dieting?

    What do you mean studies show that isn't what happens? It would be helpful to link the studies that you're referring to, as I'm not quite sure what you're saying here.
    Your problem is that you are falling into the fallacy of thinking that it's easy (for THOSE PEOPLE) to lose weight, all THEY have to do is eat less and move more. Really easy. Simple as pie. Exercise a little willpower for a change. Exercise a lot of willpower for the rest of their lives.

    In real life, people get hungrier when they eat less, and they get hungrier when they exercise more. Do people actually starve to death from regular exercise because they don't get hungrier? I would like to see your references if you are making that claim.

    People who simply exercise more lose very little weight without drastically restricting their diets, and weight loss is incredibly slow, less than a pound a month. In real life, people who go on a diet and lose weight eventually run out of willpower and binge.

    The idea that humans can naturally and indefinitely behave like laboratory subjects who are locked up and prevented from access to normal foods is fantasy.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    This is my experience, though maybe "young" was not quite right. Guys, absolutely. Evidence is that going on a diet results in a net gain of weight, and the more diets a person goes on, the more weight they gain and the harder they find it to lose.
    I would venture to guess that this is because people tend to crash diet and become overly restrictive in their eating habits because they think that's what they're supposed to do. That being said, you keep saying the word "evidence", yet you're not providing any?

    Women diet a lot more than men. Are you really trying to tell me that young guys who have never been overweight have maintained their weight through yoyo dieting?
    Strawman. I never said this, and it doesn't even make sense to begin with.

    Your problem is that you are falling into the fallacy of thinking that it's easy (for THOSE PEOPLE) to lose weight, all THEY have to do is eat less and move more. Really easy. Simple as pie. Exercise a little willpower for a change. Exercise a lot of willpower for the rest of their lives.
    It's simple, not easy. There's a big difference. Anyways, again, you're not making your point very clear. Yes, you have to exercise some form of willpower. So?

    In real life, people get hungrier when they eat less, and they get hungrier when they exercise more. Do people actually starve to death from regular exercise because they don't get hungrier? I would like to see your references if you are making that claim.
    C'mon, are you going to argue like a logical person for once? Stop attacking strawmen arguments. Also, it's funny how I've asked you several times for references to "evidence", and then you try to shift the burden of proof onto me. Anyways, like I said, exercise does not always equal more hunger. It's highly individual.

    People who simply exercise more lose very little weight without drastically restricting their diets, and weight loss is incredibly slow, less than a pound a month. In real life, people who go on a diet and lose weight eventually run out of willpower and binge.
    Where are you pulling these numbers from? And yes, like I said, most women crash-diet and turn to extreme restriction rather than sensible and flexible dieting, which causes them to fail. It's time to stop citing this as proof that dieting is flawed. It's quite obvious that crash dieting is not beneficial and causes rebound weight gain. How does this support your points?

    The idea that humans can naturally and indefinitely behave like laboratory subjects who are locked up and prevented from access to normal foods is fantasy.
    Strawman.
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  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakejoh10 View Post
    If you're metabolism is damaged, that's a different story. I never stated the rules are black and white, metabolism is essentially a moving target. However, saying a caloric deficit did not work for you doesn't say anything against the efficacy of thermodynamics.

    You must be in an energy deficit to lose weight. It's not only about calories in calories out, as metabolism, dietary induced thermogenesis, non exercise activity thermogenesis, etc. all play a role, but, again, you must be in an energy deficit to lose weight.
    The last sentence that erks me a little. I believe our bodies that are the result of millions of years of evolution understand and follow the laws of thermodynamics far better than the 100 years of physiology science our conscious thinking minds follow.

    If what you mean is that our underlying physiology happens to be in a calorie deficit unbeknownst to our conscious mind then we'll burn fat. If you mean that if we throw a known (conscious) calorie deficit (ie diet restriction, exercise) at our metabolisms and it will result in fat loss, then it is false.


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  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakejoh10 View Post
    If you're metabolism is damaged, that's a different story. I never stated the rules are black and white, metabolism is essentially a moving target. However, saying a caloric deficit did not work for you doesn't say anything against the efficacy of thermodynamics.

    You must be in an energy deficit to lose weight. It's not only about calories in calories out, as metabolism, dietary induced thermogenesis, non exercise activity thermogenesis, etc. all play a role, but, again, you must be in an energy deficit to lose weight.
    Okay, yeah, I agree with all of this. I was just offering an alternate point of view for why thermodynamics might not necessarily work the way it's supposed to for everyone. Because believe me, for those of us who are metabolically damaged, it's insanely frustrating to come here and keep seeing posts that are basically like, "If you restrict calories and exercise, you will definitely lose weight, it's SCIENCE."

    The important distinction to make is this: All people who lose weight are in an energy deficit, but not all people in an energy deficit lose weight.

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