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Thread: Runners: Are you fat? page 4

  1. #31
    kansas-klx's Avatar
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    I started on PB 52 days ago, this morning. Have lost a solid 10+ lb this year since 25 May from a starting wt of 175 lb, definitely body fat loss and muscle gain. Lots of belt line flab is gone. Did it by dropping my beloved (high cardio) OTR bicycling, at least until I find my PB base level wt/BF through nutrition and PB style fitness alone.

    Biggest takeaway from PB so far is that for the rest of my life I will NEVER AGAIN exercise for the purpose of burning calories, but consume calories (in proper amounts and composition) for the purpose of my activities, of which exercising is a main component.

    Nowadays the most cycling I do is hour long soft-peddling around town (very peaceful and enjoyable, actually). For the time being my main event for the running fast part of PBF is training to do fast sprint running intervals in support of a fast mile (which ain't so fast, really ).

    Once established on some kind of PB plateau, I will likely resume OTR cycling, at least 40km (~25 miles) time trial work, anyway, since I like hard efforts. Probably no more century work going forward for me.

    Meanwhile, my wt/BF continue to slowly trend downward with no help from me other than sticking to PB fitness and meat, vegetables, eggs, etc...

  2. #32
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    I'm not a hardcore runner, and I'm not super lean. But, here is what I've learned about myself.

    In my 20's I jogged maybe 3 times a week for 30 or 40 min at a time. I weighed probably 147ish (I'm 5'7") and was not too lean looking. I cleaned up my eating some, and stopped drinking so much, and also started running more- 5 days a week including a longer run and two interval/sprint/hill workout days. I lost 10+lbs of fat, saw a six pack and looked much smaller and pretty good although not particularly ripped.

    5 years later, still around 135, I've started lifting, which has added definition. I also still run a few times a week and try to include intensity in at least a couple runs a week. The running helps keep me fit and feeling good, and I think it helps keep fat off. The lifting makes me strong and look more "toned".

    So, I don't think running makes you fat. I think eating poorly and thinking that if you burn 300 calories, you can eat an 300 extra. But I think it's the intense running- intervals, sprints- and lifting, that do the most for the physique. And it's the eating that does the most overall. But running on it's own doesn't make you fat.

    Just my two cents

  3. #33
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    I have a fairly typical response (at least according to the bro-sci guys) to steady-state cardio done to excess. Do it for a month and lose a little weight then the weight loss stops and the usual struggle against weight gain returns even if I keep up the level of exercise. Over the years, the first month effect has weakened and the struggle part has strengthened. Which is where I live now, permanently, as far as I can tell.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    I can squat 180lbs, press 72.5lbs and deadlift 185lbs

  4. #34
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    No physical activity what so ever can make you fat since fat always comes from what you eat! Well, except from the physical activity of eating...
    Being just an old fashioned guy myself; I’m beyond tired of all these fragile mama boys (and girls!) with powder in their gluteus and soft pillows under their arm pits that cannot recover from their 3 days a week abbreviated “strength” routine…

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by ciep View Post
    But if you enjoy running, if you look forward to each run, enjoy being out there, and feel refreshed and energized at the end, then you'll probably be just fine. Some people run 7 days a week and end up very fit, healthy, and happy as a result. Like so much else we discuss on this forum, it's all about listening to your body and finding your balance.

    So interestingly (to me anyway), I bet the people who lose the most weight running, and who get in the best shape from it, are the people who learn to run simply for the sake and pleasure of it. Whereas the people who have the least success losing weight running, are the ones who are running to lose weight. Cruel irony.
    True, I run because I enjoy it. Basically, whenever the temperature outside is within a certain range (usually between 55 and 70 degrees) and it's not humid, I'm filled with a desire to run as soon as I go outside and feel the air on my skin. On those days, if I can't run for whatever reason, I feel envious when I see other people out running.

  6. #36
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    I only ever feel like I really want to run when it is one of those days where the wind is blowing and it's almost starting to rain and you're pretty certain to get caught in the storm if you go out.

    Nevertheless, I have experienced my lessening of the benefits of slow cardio with all the forms of slow cardio I have enjoyed: running, cycling and hiking.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    I can squat 180lbs, press 72.5lbs and deadlift 185lbs

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by aimlow View Post
    So, I don't think running makes you fat. I think eating poorly and thinking that if you burn 300 calories, you can eat an 300 extra.
    One of the fallacies of weight loss and control is that our appetite is under our constant conscious control, that thin people are carefully considering the calories in every bite they take and taking into account the calories they burn when deciding what and how much to eat, while heavy people are performing the same mental calculations but making a conscious decision to overeat.

    Or that though thin people are constantly performing these mental gymnastics, fat people are lazy and won't.

    The fact is that we have no control over our appetites and limited control over what we eat short of the sort of total control represented by conventional weight-loss dieting regimens.

    Willpower is unnatural and unsustainable as a means of weight control.

    That's why adding a "healthy" food or removing an "unhealthy" one may have little or no effect toward weight control, or may even have unintended consequences, as people who increase their intake of carbs while eliminating fat may find their appetite increasing. It's why studies show that people don't lose weight from exercise alone, because exercise increases the appetite.

    For many people switching from SAD to paleo has the apparent effect of reseting their appetite and weight setpoint. But it hasn't given them any more conscious control than they had when they were overweight. They are making their food selections from a different subset of foods. But they're still on autopilot.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    It's why studies show that people don't lose weight from exercise alone, because exercise increases the appetite.
    If you don't lose weight from exercise, it's because you're not in a caloric deficit. Of course, if you're not affecting energy balance by exercising then you will not lose weight. But, for example, if you're eating at maintenance calories and create a 400 calorie deficit through exercise, then you will lose weight.

    And, exercise does not always increase appetite. It's highly individual.
    My nutrition/fitness/critical thinking blog:

  9. #39
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    +1 to all of Magnolia's posts. That's been exactly my experience.

    I actually gained weight while marathon training (and believe me, it was fat, not muscle), while feeling like a starving bottomless pit the entire time. I ran the marathon with ten more pounds of fat than when I started, and I felt like shit (and it's not like I wasn't working hard--my time was under 4 hours). That marathon was literally the last time I ran a distance more than 5 miles. The only time I run anymore is light jogging with my dogs, or when they make us test our mile time at Crossfit.

    If you looked at a picture of me post-marathon and a picture of me now, you would think my head had been pasted on a different body. Crossfit has made me look damn good, and running only ever made me chubby and slouchy,

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakejoh10 View Post
    If you don't lose weight from exercise, it's because you're not in a caloric deficit. Of course, if you're not affecting energy balance by exercising then you will not lose weight. But, for example, if you're eating at maintenance calories and create a 400 calorie deficit through exercise, then you will lose weight.

    And, exercise does not always increase appetite. It's highly individual.
    It's true that there are some whose appetite does not increase when they exercise more. Most of them seem to be young guys who have never been on a cycle of dieting. It's hardly something that someone can take credit for or blame other for not being. I posted a link yesterday to a Japanese study that showed that women with certain genes seem to lose weight from a diet and exercise program, and women with different genetic makeup do not.

    What you are saying is that people need to consciously go on a diet and exercise constant willpower to lose weight from exercising. I did say that, and I would agree that would be the effect. But what I am saying is that studies show that isn't what happens, and it isn't realistic. The number of people who are able to exert constant willpower and total control for the rest of their lives is vanishingly small, far smaller than the number of those who live with eating disorders.

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