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Thread: Medtation to lower insulin levels (!) page 2

  1. #11
    jakejoh10's Avatar
    jakejoh10 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    My fasting BG when I ate <80g of carbs every day for a 6 month period was 85. Now that I eat more carbs than fat it's about 75. I tested it yesterday after a 23 hour fast. 76. Not bad. Just saying. High carb = insulin sensitivity. I'm also very careful to make my fats high SFA. I really only eat fat from steak, dairy and coconut these days. And I'm always hot. After I cold shower and my A/C blasting at 65 (ah the benefits of electricity included in rent!) I was sweating my balls off. Hurrah, thyroid...
    I see what you're saying. I eat high carb as well and it works great for me. But, for someone who's already insulin resistant, eating a high carb diet would probably be counter-productive.
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  2. #12
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    ChocoTaco369 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakejoh10 View Post
    I see what you're saying. I eat high carb as well and it works great for me. But, for someone who's already insulin resistant, eating a high carb diet would probably be counter-productive.
    True. But they'll never regain insulin sensitivity eating low carb all the time. All they'll do is avoid the problem. It takes decades to create metabolic syndrome in most cases, so it stands to reason it won't be fixed overnight. It may take years. Getting your fat intake under control - elevating SFA's and eliminating PUFA's is a great start. From there, at some point you're going to have to cycle in carbohydrate to regain sensitivity. That doesn't mean chomp down on 3 lbs of white potatoes. It does mean start lifting heavy to increase glycogen stores and insulin sensitivity, becoming fat soluble vitamin replete and slowly cycling small (but ever increasing) amounts of lower GI fruits and starches into your post-workout routine, slowly increasing quantity and GI until you can handle it. It may take years, and a blood glucose monitor is essential to finding our tolerances, but IMO I don't see another way to truly fix insulin resistance.
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    True. But they'll never regain insulin sensitivity eating low carb all the time. All they'll do is avoid the problem. It takes decades to create metabolic syndrome in most cases, so it stands to reason it won't be fixed overnight. It may take years. Getting your fat intake under control - elevating SFA's and eliminating PUFA's is a great start. From there, at some point you're going to have to cycle in carbohydrate to regain sensitivity. That doesn't mean chomp down on 3 lbs of white potatoes. It does mean start lifting heavy to increase glycogen stores and insulin sensitivity, becoming fat soluble vitamin replete and slowly cycling small (but ever increasing) amounts of lower GI fruits and starches into your post-workout routine, slowly increasing quantity and GI until you can handle it. It may take years, and a blood glucose monitor is essential to finding our tolerances, but IMO I don't see another way to truly fix insulin resistance.
    Agreed, good points.
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  4. #14
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    Actually I use to think it took decades to create metabolic syndrome, but the obese kids epidemic is tending to prove me wrong. Looks like you can get it done in just a few years if you get started early!

    Anyhow, while you look at low carb protol as avoiding the problem I view it as the prescribed treatment that gives their metabolism the time it needs to heal. Reducing the glucose and by result various stresses for months or even years, as you say, is simply what must be done in the beginning. Many that have been low carb for a period later CAN reintroduce carbs. There are quite a few bloggers that jumped on the tator waggon after a couple of years of low carb. It is going to be quite individual. Some may never be metabolically flexible again unfortunately. There truly is a limitation to matter. Not everything once broke can be fixed. But the human body is quite amazing, so all we can do is try.

    Back to OP though. Meditation is good. I don't need a study to prove it (although there are many).

    Reduced insulin is good if your context is cumulative secretion and your goals are health and longevity. I think a couple posters got things a bit mixed up here. Less insulin actually means you ARE insulin sensitive. Low insulin lifestyle is associated with improved immune function, lower risks of cancer, stroke, and dementia and are generally linked with increased longevity. Does low insulin lifestyle = low carb? Not necessarily. It does not exclude low carb as part of the protocol to achieve such a state either. There is more than one way to skin a cat, just depends on your favorite method.

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