Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 25

Thread: Intermittent Fasting - Has anyone else tried THE FAST DIET? page 2

  1. #11
    10 Bears's Avatar
    10 Bears is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North West, England
    Posts
    31
    Shop Now
    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    Sound likes you crave carbs because you restrict so much and yet you are training so much - perhaps a bit of rice and potato isn't a bad thing.
    I agree with this comment as well.

    I have done a variety of different cycles and been a low-carber for about 5 years now. I have also fasted at varying levels of intensity whilst training hard, predominantly on weights, bike for cardio and boxing.

    I noticed that when I got very intensely into the diet and training as you sound you currently are Berra, that essentially metabolism slows down and fat loss easily plateaus.

    The only thing that got the fat loss moving again, was for a short period of time eg 1 week, I would reduce the training demand and very slowly increase my carb consumption to allow a short period of recovery. Even on modest amounts of additional carbs, the body response is remarkable ie more strength and energy and a few niggles just seem to go away.

    Then when the recovery period is over, hit the diet and training hard and with your renewed energy - you will be surprised at the sudden progress. I appreciate this sounds counter intuitive, but if you think about your diet and training as if it was a muscle, when you work it too hard it becomes damaged so you back off to allow recovery and then go on to use it again when it has recovered.

    Its just the same approach with overall diet and training and in my personal experience, it has worked for me.
    Fortune Favours the Brave
    _____________________

    I can only talk from my acquired knowledge and experiences. You may have a different view or experience and I will respect that. Please respect mine.

  2. #12
    jakejoh10's Avatar
    jakejoh10 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    California
    Posts
    882
    I like IF because it's convenient and I don't like to eat early in the morning anyways.

    However, I'm a bit disappointed in the direction some people are taking it (not directing this at anyone in this thread, just in general). IF is great for some, but it seems as if people are beginning to recommend it universally and they think it has some magical benefit, which is not true.

    If you like IF, do it. If you don't like it, don't force yourself to do it because it won't really make a huge difference in the long run.
    My nutrition/fitness/critical thinking blog:

  3. #13
    picklepete's Avatar
    picklepete is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,602
    Quote Originally Posted by jakejoh10 View Post
    If you like IF, do it. If you don't like it, don't force yourself to do it because it won't really make a huge difference in the long run.
    I agree anything that causes continuous stress is bad. I find IF really valuable because the "eat now, eat more" messaging nowadays really is overwhelming. There are days where I have no biological appetite and still need to deflect spontaneous food cues constantly--coworkers, family, housemates all offer to share a "snack" (often hugely caloric). By defining a rough meal window I can say no thanks and get back to work rather than a bunch of analysis and cognitive restraint each time.
    35//6'3"/180

    My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

  4. #14
    jakejoh10's Avatar
    jakejoh10 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    California
    Posts
    882
    Quote Originally Posted by picklepete View Post
    I agree anything that causes continuous stress is bad. I find IF really valuable because the "eat now, eat more" messaging nowadays really is overwhelming. There are days where I have no biological appetite and still need to deflect spontaneous food cues constantly--coworkers, family, housemates all offer to share a "snack" (often hugely caloric). By defining a rough meal window I can say no thanks and get back to work rather than a bunch of analysis and cognitive restraint each time.
    Yeah, like I said, I love the convenience and ease of IF.
    My nutrition/fitness/critical thinking blog:

  5. #15
    dilberryhoundog's Avatar
    dilberryhoundog is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    545
    If we equate your 1 meal a day fast, to a dead lift session in terms of stress on the body, ie dead lift session is about as stressful to your physical body as a 1 meal a day fast is to your metabolism (roughly). Why then are you doing the equivalent of dead lifting every day.

    If I was to suggest a weekly deadlift protocol I would say DL on 2 non consecutive days of the week and rest the other five. This fasting protocol is suggesting the same, big stress for 2 days, rest for five days, to enable adaptation (lose fat). Your body will reconfigure far easier from this way as it can recover easily. It is not forced to deal with stress chronically (IF everyday).


    Sent from my iPhone
    A little primal gem - My Success Story
    Weight lost in 4 months - 29kg (64 lbs)

  6. #16
    jakejoh10's Avatar
    jakejoh10 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    California
    Posts
    882
    Quote Originally Posted by dilberryhoundog View Post
    If we equate your 1 meal a day fast, to a dead lift session in terms of stress on the body, ie dead lift session is about as stressful to your physical body as a 1 meal a day fast is to your metabolism (roughly). Why then are you doing the equivalent of dead lifting every day.
    I'm interested in how you're drawing this conclusion. Not arguing, just want to know how you're making this comparison.
    My nutrition/fitness/critical thinking blog:

  7. #17
    dkJames's Avatar
    dkJames is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    477
    Quote Originally Posted by dilberryhoundog View Post
    Your body will reconfigure far easier from this way as it can recover easily. It is not forced to deal with stress chronically (IF everyday).
    mmm, allow me to disagree. I eat one meal a day and it does not feel like I am stressing my metabolism. If I felt so, I would certainly not have adopted this WOE. However, physical exertion every day would probably "kill" me so I restrict intense workouts to 1 to 2x week with sprints in-between. The rest is slow pace stuff (walking and biking).

  8. #18
    dilberryhoundog's Avatar
    dilberryhoundog is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    545
    Quote Originally Posted by jakejoh10 View Post
    I'm interested in how you're drawing this conclusion. Not arguing, just want to know how you're making this comparison.
    Yep no worries.

    Everything we do on this planet involves stress.

    Stress is defined as "a movement away from homeostasis"

    Every movement from homeostasis requires rest to return to homeostasis. The bigger the movement the longer the recovery and time needed to get better at accommodating that stress.

    Some examples of "a movement from homeostasis";

    A dead lift
    A calorie deficit
    A change of job
    A bout of sun exposure
    A 30 minute jog
    A break up
    A semi poisonous food choice

    Look around there are heaps more.

    Another interesting sidenote;
    Chronic stress can be defined as a movement in homeostasis before the body has recovered from a previous similar movement in homeostasis, there are heaps of them too, an example might be a daily IF.


    Sent from my iPhone
    A little primal gem - My Success Story
    Weight lost in 4 months - 29kg (64 lbs)

  9. #19
    jakejoh10's Avatar
    jakejoh10 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    California
    Posts
    882
    Quote Originally Posted by dilberryhoundog View Post
    Yep no worries.

    Everything we do on this planet involves stress.

    Stress is defined as "a movement away from homeostasis"

    Every movement from homeostasis requires rest to return to homeostasis. The bigger the movement the longer the recovery and time needed to get better at accommodating that stress.

    Some examples of "a movement from homeostasis";

    A dead lift
    A calorie deficit
    A change of job
    A bout of sun exposure
    A 30 minute jog
    A break up
    A semi poisonous food choice

    Look around there are heaps more.

    Another interesting sidenote;
    Chronic stress can be defined as a movement in homeostasis before the body has recovered from a previous similar movement in homeostasis, there are heaps of them too, an example might be a daily IF.


    Sent from my iPhone
    Ah ok, I see what you're saying. However, are we talking IF such as the Leangains method of the 16 hour fast and the 8 hour eating window, or are we talking full day fasts? If we're talking about the former, then I disagree that it will accumulate to any amount of stress as to be problematic. But, if we're talking about full day fasts, then I agree.
    My nutrition/fitness/critical thinking blog:

  10. #20
    dilberryhoundog's Avatar
    dilberryhoundog is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    545
    Quote Originally Posted by jakejoh10 View Post
    Ah ok, I see what you're saying. However, are we talking IF such as the Leangains method of the 16 hour fast and the 8 hour eating window, or are we talking full day fasts? If we're talking about the former, then I disagree that it will accumulate to any amount of stress as to be problematic. But, if we're talking about full day fasts, then I agree.
    Here is one of the last parts of the stress theory that I didn't mention;

    There is a damage/failure threshold at the other end of all movements from homeostasis. This is the point where the object can no longer handle or accommodate that stress and it ends in damage or failure. The interesting thing about chronic stress is that each time you demand a new stress on a system that had not recovered from an old one this damage/failure threshold gets reduced (ie closer). To test this do the following;

    Squat down touch your toes then stand up again. Ok so you pretty much recover from that stress in a few seconds correct? Ie it is not a massive movement from homeostasis, it is well below the failure threshold. Now try doing that same squat consecutively you will eventually reach a point where your legs fail. What happened? You stressed your squat muscles again before the few seconds it took to recover, meanwhile the failure threshold lowered slightly. You did it again the same happened, this repeated all the way down until failure threshold met with the movement from homeostasis amount and you failed.
    If you did the same test with 100lbs on your shoulders you would've found that the movement from homeostasis was larger therefore recovery time was longer but because you where still doing them consecutively the failure threshold came down significantly quicker.

    This test holds true over many different stressors, try a calorie deficit and a larger calorie deficit. If you do them over the same time period (ie a day), you will reach metabolic downreg (failure) faster with the larger stress.

    Now with leangains who knows if it is a movement from homeostasis, my bet is it is, how much of a movement is it I don't know, so I don't know recovery timeframes. My guess is it is a little longer than a day, so in my books each consecutive leangains fast will bring the damage/ failure threshold down ever so slowly until it is reached. This could be many years away or only weeks it depends on the persons homeostasis.


    Sent from my iPhone
    A little primal gem - My Success Story
    Weight lost in 4 months - 29kg (64 lbs)

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •