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Thread: East Coast Grass Fed Beef is No Good

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  1. #1
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    East Coast Grass Fed Beef is No Good

    ...at least that's what the guy selling his 'Grass & Grain' fed angus said at the farmers market. He said the grass on the east coast is too 'moist' and goes right through the cattle. "That's why the buffalo weren't roaming over here. The west coast grass is drier and produces better beef." His angus is 'marbleized' because he supplements their diet with grain, whereas the pure grass fed stuff over here is stringy and tough. What do you guys think? Any truth to this or just a merchant trying to push product?

  2. #2
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    I think he's trying to sell you his beef.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    I think he's trying to sell you his beef.
    Indeed.

    Shop Rite often has whole grassfed beef tenderloin imported from Australia for $6.99/lb. It was actually on sale last week for that price. It isn't stringy. It isn't as tender as a grainfed beef tenderloin, that is true, but it is so much more flavorful it is unbelievable. USDA beef is flat and tasteless by comparison.
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  4. #4
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    That seller is putting you on, big time. Yes, I find grass-fed beef to be less tender also but with more flavor. But I think a lot of the difference is in the aging. Commercial beef is wet-aged usually 3 days. Several grass-fed beef farmers will dry-age their beef for you and sometimes will do it up to a full week. That will be tender beef. A rancher in Montana dry-ages his grass-fed beef for 8 days for very pricey restaurants.

    If you get grass-fed beef that is not aged at all it is really, really tough, but any beef would be.
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  5. #5
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    Umm, wet grass does tend to make for odd manure, but it is mainly during the spring season when the grass is really rich. I get grass fed locally and the steaks are less tender, but still good.

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  6. #6
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    Totally bogus. Here in NC cattle become fat yummy beasts on 1 acre : 1 cow, which was nothing like the kind of range needed on the cattle ranch where I grew up in California. And there weren't buffalo because there isn't large grassland, there are TREES. You have to clear out the trees in the east to make space for cows to live.
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  7. #7
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    The buffalo weren't roaming on the east coast b/c it was primarily forest until the white man arrived and started cutting down trees.
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    Far healthier!

  8. #8
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    and rocky forests at that.

    am surprised he brags about the grain supplement though since that's one of the slams against cafo beef, not being what an herbivore is designed to digest..
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

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  9. #9
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    The customers of East Coast grass-fed beef growers would be surprised to hear that.

  10. #10
    Actually I believe some bison did roam here in the east. But that was before Europeans arrived. The native peoples kept large areas open and unforested with controlled burns.

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