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Thread: Beef shoulder roast help page

  1. #1
    mrfarrar's Avatar
    mrfarrar is offline Junior Member
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    Beef shoulder roast help

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    So I'm still relatively new to the Primal Lifestyle, but I'm absolutely loving discovering and learning new things about it. I started off pretty slowly, just trying to cut out any super processed foods, then grains/wheat, then CAFO meat products, etc. So far, its going great.

    Anyway, my question today is about the roast that I cooked last night. It was a grass-fed beef shoulder roast from a local farmer that I picked up at the farmer's market Saturday. I cooked it in the slow-cooker overnight, and HOLY COW, it turned out delicious! (couldn't help myself from tasting - read make a meal - this morning). This is the first time I've cooked a roast that still had the bone in it, and the juice that it made is unreal. I honestly hate to throw away the bone and juice. Is there something that can be done with this, maybe a soup or something? Anyone have any ideas or recipes? Look forward to hearing back from y'all!

    Mike

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    JoanieL's Avatar
    JoanieL is offline Senior Member
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    The juice - absolutely put it in the fridge and use it to flavor other stuff, or just drink it reheated. I use juices from slow cooked meats when I make rice or potatoes.

    The bone. Depending on how big it is, either freeze it and start saving your (grass fed and pastured) bones to make bone broth, or if it's big enough, as is, make some bone broth just with it. Most folks use a slow cooker, but I use a pressure cooker. For me, bone broth takes about 2.5 hours in an eight quart pressure cooker. I don't know how long it takes in a slow cooker, but I think over night isn't unheard of.

    Basics: bones, a couple of tablespoons of vinegar, water.

    Some folks like the bones roasted before making broth. Bone broth is good for you - all kinds of minerals. Some folks add salt while they're making the broth; I like adding salt when I use it, either just drinking it reheated, or to make rice, potatoes, etc. Also, it has a short shelf life, even in the fridge, so if you end up with a few quarts, cool it down and freeze any you won't consume in the next few days.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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  3. #3
    freerangepiglings's Avatar
    freerangepiglings is offline Senior Member
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    Drink it!

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    noodletoy's Avatar
    noodletoy is offline Senior Member
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    when i make braises i reserve the liquid and freeze it. then use it to cook the next batch of meat.

    reduce it down for easier storage.
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    Ernest Hemingway

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