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  1. #11
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    Primal Fuel
    Oh, yes. The primal blueprint lifted my brain fog as well.
    "I know what my body needs and what it can handle. There's no better way to achieve my goal than what im doing now. If my regimen leads to my death, be it in six days or six months...I will die fullfiled. The outcome is irrelavent so long as i steer towards my fate. If death is to be my prize, i welcome it with open arms."

    "A pound of meat a day keeps the doctor away"

  2. #12
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    Sorry for taking so long to reply to you. I've been busy studying for my own exams which are coming up next week.

    It sounds like you're making some positive steps to kick this condition into touch. How's it going so far, any improvement yet?

    Personally I seem to have taken two steps forward and one back, but I don't think that points to a failure in the PB diet at all. I gave up the grains and very quickly started feeling better, though to avoid that whole dying of malnutrition thingy reintroduced foods that I'd eliminated like milk, eggs and soy protein and boosted my consumption of legumes to compensate for the calorie deficit.

    If it's the lectins I'm sensitive to then this could be explained by eating lots of beans, eggs and dairy. I know the true PB diet is all about the meat, but I'm reticent to go back to it because I was beginning to like the whole veggie/vegan ethos and actually enjoying the food. Just looking at all the grease that comes out of meat as it cooks now makes me want to retch and I'm still struggling to get my head around how making saturated fat your main source of energy can be healthy.

    Maybe I could keep up the veggie diet but soak everything to remove as many of the lectins as possible. *Sigh* When did the act of eating become so damn complicated?

    I've got an appointment with an immunologist next week so hopefully she'll be able to shine a light on some of this to eliminate the guesswork.

    Good to hear PB is working for you Grappler.

  3. #13
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    Sorry for my late reply, I've only recently seen that you posted when I checked my email!

    Seeing as I'm a week late (), have your exams already started? You feeling confident in them? I'm sure with all that studying that you'll do well, no problems there. As long as there's no stressing, you'll get the results you want, but I'm pretty sure you already know that!

    My fogginess is still as...'normal' as ever. That's what confuses me about it, it doesn't seem to change drastically, but it has gradually worsened as the years have passed. I'll be frank about what I think may be the culprit though; lack of regular exercise.

    For as long as I can remember, I've been an indoor kinda guy. I wasn't isolated by any means, though. I've always had close friends and have had no issues whatsoever socially. To be specific, I basically mean that unless my parents / friends wanted to go out somewhere, I had no reason to go outside. I was more than happy to stay indoors and play games (I'm a nerd, but gaming has been my favourite hobby since I was 4); I never got bored. I was well-behaved, always happy, and there was no such thing as brain fog. My mental clarity was always at it's peak. My diet was centered around junk food (Wagon Wheels and Jaffa Cakes especially) for snacks, Weetabix for breakfast and before bed, and dinners usually featured potatoes, grains, legumes, etc. Essentially, my diet was a representation of everything that is wrong in life. Yet I felt completely fine.

    Exercise-wise, the only time I regularly exercised was at school. Obviously we didn't call it exercise, it was playing! Running around playing tag, dodgeball, basketball, re-enacting our favourite cartoons and games; everything! I was very active in that regard (as we all were), accumulating at least an hour a day of playing out in terms of physical activity. That's not even mentioning our PE classes. The point was, we had fun, so feeling good about ourselves and keeping us physically and mentally fit was basically guaranteed in that area.

    Sleep-wise, I had perfect sleep. Every, single, night. I would wake up feeling refreshed, bright-eyed, everything I desire now. I would always wake up at 7:30, and I would always be asleep the moment my head the pillow at 8:30-9:00pm. I was a deep sleeper, and very rarely would I have trouble sleeping. Maybe a few days out of a year would I have any problems.

    Up until year 9-ish in Secondary school was when I began to have persistent brain fog problems, if I'm recalling accurately. Ever so gradually, exercising at breaktime rarely happened. The only activity anyone ever did was football, and that bores me. It wasn't just me though; everyone, as they got older, seemed to just become less active at breaks, either because it wasn't 'cool' to play things like tag anymore, or because everyone was busy studying for the ever-so-important exams, that progressively became harder and more time-consuming as the years went by. If I only exercised at PE at school (which was never adequate), then obviously problems will start to happen. Perhaps it has taken a few years for my lifestyle to catch up, but it seems to be the case now.

    Why don't I just fix the situation by upping my exercise routine (specifically low-level aerobics; I do bodyweight exercises whenever possible)? One word; acne. I'm currently taking Roaccutane to be rid of it for good, as I've tried a couple of years of antibiotics and following the PB way of eating to no avail. The acne worsened to the point where I'm extremely self-conscious, and it completely shot my self-esteem. Right when I have the motivation and enthusiasm to go out more, too!

    I'm not sure why exactly, but I can take a good shot at guessing as to why my acne has become so severe in the past few months. Stress. I've had a few pimples and very, very, mild acne that fluctuated in severity during these teen years, but I actually think that the major trigger was when I began to really stress over my brain fog, because I know how much it affects me. All of a sudden my acne became severe with cysts and high levels of inflammation (you could see how red they were, and they were painful). I thought that by correcting my diet, my brain fog will eventually disappear because I was eliminating wheat, dairy and high GI foods, the common culprits. When I realised that my brain fog was not improving in the slightest, I increasingly grew frustrated at all the things I tried with no luck. Now that I think about it, I began to become concerned with my health due to sleep problems; I never woke up refreshed anymore, and was persistently tired. Having late nights on weekdays didn't help, believe me, yet by having an early night (I could still nod off as I soon as I got into bed back then), my fatigue and brain fog were almost guaranteed to be fixed by the following morning. This doesn't seem to be the case anymore, although at least I've ruled out sleep itself as a cause. My diminished sleep quality is a symptom of something that's wrong with my lifestyle, and it seems to me that being indoors for the majority of the time is the red flag here.

    I've only got 3 months left of my Roaccutane course; as soon as that's done I'll be active everyday, especially with low-level exercising like walking. Being sedentary will very likely reduce my sleep quality, not to mention the fact that aerobic exercises, like walking, will increase blood flow to the brain. If I have no improvements at all within 3 months of being regularly active, I'll try using herbal remedies like Ginkgo Biloba and see how that goes. No such thing as giving up!

    Just looking at all the grease that comes out of meat as it cooks now makes me want to retch and I'm still struggling to get my head around how making saturated fat your main source of energy can be healthy.
    While I haven't tried vegetarian/vegan dieting, you reminded me of the time when I discovered that grains were unhealthy. Ahh, I still remember my reaction, "...does this mean I can't have toast anymore? No more bread? No more cereal!?". I was in shock, I literally didn't know how I could possibly live without those foods! It's amazing how much we grow accustomed to our own perceptions of what's healthy.

    I've got an appointment with an immunologist next week so hopefully she'll be able to shine a light on some of this to eliminate the guesswork.
    Your immunologist will be a huge help. Knowing the cause of the fog will help immensely in letting you avoid the true culprits.

    Be sure to let us know how your exams and results turn up!

  4. #14
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    Are you sure it isn't a brain cloud? Tom Hank's character in Joe versus the Volcano was diagnosed with a terminal brain cloud. He ended up sacrificing himself by jumping into a volcano!

    LOL. Brain Fog just made me laugh and think of that movie.



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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beef Cake View Post
    Are you sure it isn't a brain cloud? Tom Hank's character in Joe versus the Volcano was diagnosed with a terminal brain cloud. He ended up sacrificing himself by jumping into a volcano!

    LOL. Brain Fog just made me laugh and think of that movie.



    Lmao, I've never heard of this movie! Who's face is Photoshopped over Hanks'?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by KG View Post
    Sorry for my late reply, I've only recently seen that you posted when I checked my email!
    No problem. Life happens.

    Seeing as I'm a week late (), have your exams already started? You feeling confident in them? I'm sure with all that studying that you'll do well, no problems there. As long as there's no stressing, you'll get the results you want, but I'm pretty sure you already know that!
    Yep, started and finished, thanks, and I'm pretty sure I've passed them all despite feeling like I might fall asleep at any minute. Feels good to get those behind me at last.

    Lack of exercise alone could explain your symptoms I suppose. Who knows? Some people seem to be able to abuse their bodies with booze, drugs and cigarettes all their lives and feel on top of the world until they kick the bucket well into their nighties. For others, taking a few minor liberties is enough to send their health into a downward spiral.

    From what I hear we all have our own personal threshold for tolerating particular lifestyles. We're fine up to a point and then it's like a switch has been flicked and our bodies decide enough is enough. At one point I used to live on little other than 'healthy' cereal and cereal bars and didn't think twice that all that sugar might eventually kick me in the backside. Most people eat cereal with milk but I didn't even do that because I decided long ago I didn't want the extra calories so put boiling water on it instead. In effect I wasn't getting the added protein milk provides to help moderate the insulin release.

    As you know, everyone is different, but I've exercised every single day for about 13 years now and it hasn't helped with the fog at all. I started when I finally decided to lose the puppy fat I'd been lugging around since puberty due to taking steroids to control asthma. Once I got into the routine I felt I had to exercise to earn the right to eat and felt guilty and depressed if I didn't so that was my motivation for keeping it up.

    I can totally relate to your issues with acne. My skin was horrible when I was your age too. I tried Roaccutane and remember it drying out my face so badly it looked like an Ethiopian desert. My lips were cracked and inside my nose was so raw it would bleed several times a day. Thankfully I soon ditched it after reading some of the horror stories that were in the press at the time.

    I experimented with another drug called Erythromycin and that made me break out in unbearably itchy hives. It was like being stabbed with a thousand pins all over my your body. Fun times!

    Keeping your skin dry is probably about the best thing you can do for acne and you can achieve that by washing your face with shower gel without any dangerous medications. Have you noticed how quickly it starts to burn your skin if you don't wash it off right away? What I would do is put it on my face, spend a few minutes brushing my teeth, then wash it off. It will make your skin bright red as if you've spent too long in the sun, but that soon settles down. Just don't leave it on over night or you'll wake up looking like Skeletor.

    I'm sure you've considered every possible angle which might explain your fog, but is it possible that the antibiotics/Roaccutane are the culprit or at least contributing to the problem? What happens if you eliminate them?

    In my case what cured my acne was age - the simple act of growing out of it as 99% of people do. The only consolation you have at this stage in your life is that you're not alone. It's just something that goes hand in hand with being a teenager unfortunately.

    Your immunologist will be a huge help. Knowing the cause of the fog will help immensely in letting you avoid the true culprits.
    That's what I thought too... until I spoke to her. I'd barely opened my mouth when she declared that I was talking rubbish, it was all in my head, that diet couldn't cause the symptoms I described and that she specialises in allergy, not intolerance so was not the best person to help anyway.

    I couldn't believe what I was hearing. I was so exasperated and disillusioned when I realised this consultant who I'd been pinning all my hopes on had turned out to be as much use as an inflatable dartboard that I nearly broke down in front of her. At this point she said she'd refer me an endocrinologist with a special interest in chronic fatigue. I expect I'll wait three months to see her and she'll refer me to the bus driver or postman.

    Sorry this post is so negative, but that should explain where I'm coming from.

    Are you sure it isn't a brain cloud? Tom Hank's character in Joe versus the Volcano was diagnosed with a terminal brain cloud. He ended up sacrificing himself by jumping into a volcano!

    LOL. Brain Fog just made me laugh and think of that movie.
    Never seen it myself, but I knew there had to be a solution! We don't have too many volcanos here in Manchester so maybe I could visit one as a health tourist.
    Last edited by PlaydohYeti; 06-18-2010 at 02:55 PM.

  7. #17
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    I've only just skimmed this thread and I just wanted to toss in a thought - have you looked at environmental issues/toxins? Apologies if you've mentioned it and I've missed it.

    I raise this because I have a collection of vague GI symptoms (sufficient that I went and had tests), seasonal allergies etc, as well as a permanently fuzzy head. I'm very sensitive to chemicals - if I stand near a person wearing the wrong kind of perfume, my sinuses ache terribly. There's a lot of materials that give off formaldeyde and other volatiles - wood, especially that compressed particle board used in furniture, vinyl, carpets etc. Plus there's things like mould - sometimes hidden in old buildings. And 'dirty electricity' (jury is out on this one... usually seems to be a general-purpose-conspiracy-theory, but ..??)

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlaydohYeti View Post
    I can totally relate to your issues with acne. My skin was horrible when I was your age too. I tried Roaccutane and remember it drying out my face so badly it looked like an Ethiopian desert. My lips were cracked and inside my nose was so raw it would bleed several times a day. Thankfully I soon ditched it after reading some of the horror stories that were in the press at the time.
    I did the exact same thing regarding the horror stories. I heard about the potency of Roaccutane and did my research. The positive 'success stories' were encouraging to say the least, but the fact that some people had permanent side effects after treatment seriously freaked me out. I was scared to go on the medication and hesitated a lot. I ended up going on it anyway, because nothing was working anymore and my acne was only gradually getting worse by the day. I got sick of all the looks of strangers in the street. I'm usually very self-confident and don't give a care in the world how I look to others, but with acne I feel alienated in public. I shouldn't care, but when your conscious mind is constantly nagging "they keep looking at me..." all day, needless to say it screws up the psyche. I'm taking time off 6th form to get the course completely over with, not to mention to try and get my brain fog sorted out. I genuinely care about my future, but in my present foggy state, I honestly cannot care any less about my education right now. Seeing as I have beat the fog in the past (no specific method, yet I'm sure I got more sleep), it truly is like a light switch when the fog lifts. All of a sudden, you're back to normal, and all these negative thoughts and worries completely dissipate in an instant, and you're left thinking to yourself "how the hell did I live life? I'm actually alive again!"

    I'm sure you've considered every possible angle which might explain your fog, but is it possible that the antibiotics/Roaccutane are the culprit or at least contributing to the problem? What happens if you eliminate them?
    From what I can remember, my medications (Oxytetracycline, and now Roaccutane) neither helped nor exacerbated the fog. However, I have actually thought about the possibility of candida. I took my antibiotics for a very long time, on an on-and-off basis as my acne kept fluctuating from clear to moderate. In total, however, I'd say that I was on the Oxytetracycline tablets for at least a year. I checked my tongue, and I do indeed have a white, fuzzy tongue (apparently a sign of candida). Perhaps I just need to stick to my guns and continue with the PB (which I intend to for the rest of my life, regardless), seeing as the prime candidate in aggravating candida is carbohydrates. I don't have any cravings whatsoever anymore, though, which I heard is a main symptom of candida.

    Even if the exercise doesn't clear my fog out, having things like improved sleep quality will especially help. I can't help but shake the feeling that I simply need to fully correct my lifestyle and my fog will lift in due time. The PB has the exact layout needed to cover me entirely.

    That's what I thought too... until I spoke to her. I'd barely opened my mouth when she declared that I was talking rubbish, it was all in my head, that diet couldn't cause the symptoms I described and that she specialises in allergy, not intolerance so was not the best person to help anyway.

    I couldn't believe what I was hearing. I was so exasperated and disillusioned when I realised this consultant who I'd been pinning all my hopes on had turned out to be as much use as an inflatable dartboard that I nearly broke down in front of her. At this point she said she'd refer me an endocrinologist with a special interest in chronic fatigue. I expect I'll wait three months to see her and she'll refer me to the bus driver or postman.

    Sorry this post is so negative, but that should explain where I'm coming from.
    Haha! At least with the postman and bus driver you won't have to wait for months every single time you make an appointment with another specialist.

    You suffer from chronic fatigue? While I'm more tired than I should be, I wouldn't consider myself to have CFS.

    Let me point you to a site that's helped me a lot in narrowing down my problem with my fog. Chances are you already know the site, but if not, I think you'll find it very useful. I used that site in conjunction with MDA and the PB, and their principles are essentially identical in terms of diet, supplementation, exercise habits, sleep etc.

    http://www.drmyhill.co.uk/

    There's a lot of in-depth articles in there that explain how problems start and how to treat them. From what I've read of her recommendations for brain fog, exercise routines, diet etc. she definitely knows what she's talking about.

    Sorry this post is so negative, but that should explain where I'm coming from.
    Don't sweat it!

    Considering the details you've given, it's only natural to be frustrated and perhaps feel abandoned by someone who labels themselves as a professional. It's best to approach problems with realism, because then you get a clear idea of how to tackle whatever it is that's bothering you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Helen in Oz View Post
    I've only just skimmed this thread and I just wanted to toss in a thought - have you looked at environmental issues/toxins? Apologies if you've mentioned it and I've missed it.

    I raise this because I have a collection of vague GI symptoms (sufficient that I went and had tests), seasonal allergies etc, as well as a permanently fuzzy head. I'm very sensitive to chemicals - if I stand near a person wearing the wrong kind of perfume, my sinuses ache terribly. There's a lot of materials that give off formaldeyde and other volatiles - wood, especially that compressed particle board used in furniture, vinyl, carpets etc. Plus there's things like mould - sometimes hidden in old buildings. And 'dirty electricity' (jury is out on this one... usually seems to be a general-purpose-conspiracy-theory, but ..??)
    For me, personally, my fog has been with me 24/7 for years, like some kind of twisted companion. No matter where I am; at home, at school, or out in nature, my fog just consistently sticks with me wherever I go. The more I know, the better. I just keep narrowing down all the possible causes, yet it doesn't seem to be anything specific that's causing my fog. I'll get there!

  9. #19
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    Helen - I've found that certain strong perfumes/aftershaves make my fog worse and sometimes tip me over the edge into a migraine aura. In the last office I worked in the cleaner insisted on wearing the cheapest, nastiest, most pungent perfume I've ever had the misfortune to encounter. I could always tell when she was on her way because I'd get dizzy before she even entered the room. My boss who was also sensitive to toxic fumes would run into her office, slam the door and open her window until half an hour after the cleaner had left. Everyone else laughed at the extreme reaction, but I could definitely sympathise.

    On another occasion I got in a car with my brother who'd just doused himself in Lynx something-or-other. All of a sudden this spaced out sensation washed over me and my head felt much larger than it should have been as if it was inflating - perceived changes to body parts are another symptom of migraine aura (also known as Alice in Wonderland syndrome).

    Like KG though, I've had this fog for a long time and in all situations. I've changed jobs many times and moved house 4 times in the last 10 years partly due to this condition and things have never improved from one environment to another so I think this is a minor factor for me too. Thanks for the suggestion anyway.

    Quote Originally Posted by KG View Post
    I got sick of all the looks of strangers in the street. I'm usually very self-confident and don't give a care in the world how I look to others, but with acne I feel alienated in public. I shouldn't care, but when your conscious mind is constantly nagging "they keep looking at me..." all day, needless to say it screws up the psyche.
    We live in such an image-obsessed world it's no wonder we beat ourselves up over every imperfection. Some are easily camouflaged, but obviously you can't hide your face and it's the first thing people see when they meet or walk past you so I know how all-consuming acne can become.

    Ironically you'll be gawping at everyone you walk past to see if they're staring at you. If they weren't already rubber-necking, they'll wonder what's wrong with them to make you look so intently and stare back. For one reason or another they'll all be looking at you.

    On the plus side it's summer here in England and the sun is finally putting in an appearance and I expect you know that's one of the best cures for acne. Another great reason to get out there and get some exercise.

    From what I can remember, my medications (Oxytetracycline, and now Roaccutane) neither helped nor exacerbated the fog. However, I have actually thought about the possibility of candida. I took my antibiotics for a very long time, on an on-and-off basis as my acne kept fluctuating from clear to moderate. In total, however, I'd say that I was on the Oxytetracycline tablets for at least a year. I checked my tongue, and I do indeed have a white, fuzzy tongue (apparently a sign of candida).
    That's cropped up many times for me as I've researched brain fog symptoms on the web. It definitely seems to be the cause for some and it appears to be a condition that can be diagnosed and treated.

    You suffer from chronic fatigue? While I'm more tired than I should be, I wouldn't consider myself to have CFS.
    No, not really. Not to the extent that I'm bed-bound, unable to move a muscle as with the extreme cases (maybe after a bowl of wheat cereal, but not usually). Otherwise I share some of the symptoms and generally look and feel like something from Night of the Living Dead which would give the impression of CFS. Hopefully I'm not teetering on the edge of the real deal.

    Let me point you to a site that's helped me a lot in narrowing down my problem with my fog. Chances are you already know the site, but if not, I think you'll find it very useful. I used that site in conjunction with MDA and the PB, and their principles are essentially identical in terms of diet, supplementation, exercise habits, sleep etc.

    http://www.drmyhill.co.uk/

    There's a lot of in-depth articles in there that explain how problems start and how to treat them. From what I've read of her recommendations for brain fog, exercise routines, diet etc. she definitely knows what she's talking about.
    Thanks for the tip. No, I hadn't seen this one before so I'll have to set aside some time to properly delve into it and look forward to finding some answers there.

  10. #20
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    I have also only skimmed this thread (feeling rather ADD lol). But the foggy head and many other issues I could totally relate to. Try reading about Candida and taking Crook's Candida Questionairre. Along with this diet, coconut oil and taking a few natural antifungals and a great probiotic I beat a mild candida issue which bloated me, caused a lot of food allergies (many of which are gone now!) gave me digestive issues - HUGE FOGGY HEADEDNESS (everything felt like a dream), dizziness, etc.

    It is a bit of a battle and you have to be 100% clean for some time until your symptoms are gone, but it really worked for me!!

    Some of the things on this diet (vinegar, soy sauce, nuts) have to be avoided until you get things under control.....

    It took me about 4 - 6 months, but really helped! I feel like a new person - hope this helps you!

    P.S. - It is difficult for a doctor to diagnose candida, but the cure (primal diet, avoidance of certain foods, taking natural supplements) aren't going to hurt anyone, so it's always worth a try.

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