Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Natural unpasteurized beer page

  1. #1
    Mick's Avatar
    Mick Guest

    1



    Not so much live beer available in the bottle, although on draught live beers are easy enough to find in the UK. Here's some "bottle conditioned" beers I've located for various countries in case anyone's interested. The list for the UK is only a sample: there are quite a few others. The US has a lot of local microbreweries these days, many of which are almost certainly offering natural beer in the bottle. Northern France and Belgium have some bottle-conditioned beer. The larger bottles can be spotted by their champagne corks - those beers, some of theme brewed by Trappist monks, tend to be crazy strong.


    UK


    Hogsback T.E.A. (widely available in supermarkets)


    http://www.hogsback.co.uk/


    Hopback (several beers, including the well-known Summer Lightning)


    http://www.hopback.co.uk/


    Hepworth (Prospect beer is live in the bottle and also organic. Some branches of Waitrose)


    http://www.hepworthbrewery.co.uk/


    US


    Sierra Nevada (Their live Pale Ale is widely sold in the US and exported too. Other beers may be live.)


    http://www.sierranevada.com/


    Hair of the Dog (This brewery brews organic beer and it says some is live)


    http://www.hairofthedog.com/index.html


    Australia


    Coopers


    http://www.coopers.com.au/


    Canada


    Schoune (some Belgian-style beers, some pale ales.)


    http://www.schoune.com/


    Finland


    Finlandia (Finlandia Sahti Ky - cloudy traditional beer flavoured with juniper berries)


    http://www.finlandiasahti.fi/


  2. #2
    Catalina's Avatar
    Catalina is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    37

    1



    This is a very thorough list--you must know your beers! I have to show my ignorance, though. . .what is a "live" beer? And, any thoughts on gluten-free beer versus regular? We all avoid wheat in general, so I'm wondering about beers.


  3. #3
    Katt's Avatar
    Katt is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Sanford, FL
    Posts
    316

    1



    My husband sometimes brews his own beer. It isn't that difficult, though it does require a certain amount of space for the bottles and gear. According to the WAPF, fermented grains are ok. But they are still high in carbs.

    Start weight: 250 - 06/2009
    Current weight: 199
    Goal: 145

  4. #4
    Mick's Avatar
    Mick Guest

    1

    [quote]

    This is a very thorough list--you must know your beers!
    </blockquote>


    Actually, it&#39;s only a selection. I don&#39;t know much about the U.S. situation either. AFAIK, microbreweries have really taken off there ,and those are just the sort of places that might do this.
    [quote]

    . . .what is a "live" beer?
    </blockquote>


    Still with the micro-organisms that fermented it - yeast mostly - alive in it. With all canned beer, with most bottled beer - and even with quite a lot that claims to be "on draught" - those are killed off. They pasteurize the beer with heat, and then they filter it. Sometimes they add potentially harmful additives, too.


    It&#39;s the old, old story. If you over-process a foodstuff, you give it a longer shelf-life, but at the cost of taste and also at the cost of making it less nutritious.


    I guess we should all go easy with alcoholic drinks anyway, but if they&#39;ve been over-processed they really are empty calories.


    There&#39;s a lot more on live beer and its advantages here:


    http://www.camra.org.uk/page.aspx?o=raib


    I suppose it&#39;s "primal" too. Spirits (distilled liquor) are fairly modern - and might be best avoided even if they weren&#39;t. But fermented drinks go way back. Probably people have been making them ever since there have been people. Even elephants deliberately go for rotting fruit, because it&#39;s slightly alcoholic - and they&#39;re not the only animals that do. It can&#39;t have taken humans long to find that they could, to a certain extent, control the fermentation that animals can only exploit when it occurs. It&#39;s said that probably the earliest fermented drink was mead - fermented honey. Even the Bushmen - genetically probably the world&#39;s "oldest" people - made that. Fermented fruit juices - wine from grapes, cider from apples, perry from pears, and so on, can&#39;t have been far behind. Beer you&#39;d get spontaneously, if you sprouted grain to process it and then forgot it and wild yeast got in.
    [quote]

    And, any thoughts on gluten-free beer versus regular? We all avoid wheat in general, so I&#39;m wondering about beers.
    </blockquote>


    There are wheat beers, but most beer is made from barley. (Some cheap beers, however, have an awful lot of rice, flaked maize, or sugar in, so that cheapskate brewers can save on the cost of buying real malted barley.)


    In Germany, by law, beer could only contain malt, hops, yeast, and water - the Reinheitsgebot law. However, the EU (that malignant and malicious organization of ne-er do wells) has set that law aside - claiming it was restraint of trade because other countries in the EU couldn&#39;t price-dump cheap beer made from pseduo-ingredients on the Germans, owing to their sensible national legislation.


    Barley does contain some gluten, but I don&#39;t think anyone who doesn&#39;t actually test gluten-intolerant need worry about looking for gluten-free beer.


    I should mention for the sake of completeness that, as Katt notes, the Weston A. Proce Foundation does tend to warn people that most traditional societies don&#39;t eat unprocessed grain: they sprout it or they ferment it (e.g., sourdough bread). They do that to neutralize the phytates and enzyme-inhibitors in it - potent anti-nutrients that modern food-factories and supermarkets don&#39;t even know, much less care, about.


    However, the WAPF is thinking of lactic-ferments not yeast-ferments when it says that. They&#39;re thinking of "sourdough" bread and "soured" porridges when they say that.


    However, they don&#39;t seem to be against alcoholic drinks.


    They recommend that people drink only unpasteurized beer or wine - guideline 15 here:


    http://www.westonaprice.org/basicnutrition/dietguidelines.html


    I&#39;m fine with that, although I think they ought to add unpasteurized cider, perry, country fruit wines, and mead, too!


  5. #5
    lbd's Avatar
    lbd
    lbd is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    29

    1



    If you are gluten-intolerant or gluten-sensitive, you should not be drinking any barley-based beer. A little gluten is not OK for anyone sensitive to gluten. Not everyone who is gluten-intolerant tests as such. The standard tests are notoriously prone to false-negatives. The ultimate test is positive response to a gluten-free diet.


    That being said, there are several decent non-gluten beers out there: Red Bridge and New Grist being two of them.


  6. #6
    Mick's Avatar
    Mick Guest

    1

    [quote]

    Not everyone who is gluten-intolerant tests as such</blockquote>


    Sound like ideology to me. But as you please.


    As for this "Red Bridge" is seems to be by Annheuser Busch, so it will be anything but "decent" or even drinkable. And it is hardly likely to be unpasteurized.


    Those who want good beer don&#39;t go to industrial combines.


    As I implied, those with genuine problems, coeliacs and so forth, had best steer clear of beer. They should drink wine or cider.


    Those wanting drinkable beer, look for unpasteurized, unfiltered beer, live in the bottle from a good small brewer with some pride that cares about the quality of its product and the interests of its customers.


  7. #7
    lbd's Avatar
    lbd
    lbd is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    29

    1



    "Ideology?" "Genuine" problems? Kind of harsh. Lots of research to back this up and as someone who is gluten-intolerant with a very strong science background, I&#39;ve done my research. But whatever, I&#39;m not here to argue, If you want to learn more about gluten intolerance and sensitivity, there is plenty of information backed by good scientific research out there and I don&#39;t want to argue the point here. Actually there is increasing evidence that all grains are toxic to everyone--- isn&#39;t that what led many of us in the primal direction?


    By "decent" I didn&#39;t mean the beer was sensational, but it does the trick for someone who cannot drink regular beer due to barley malt and wants a beer to eat with her steamed crabs. New Grist is produced by a microbrewery called Lakefront in Wisconsin. Yes, Red Bridge is by A-B and is the equivalent of white bread.


  8. #8
    Catalina's Avatar
    Catalina is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    37

    1



    Thanks for the extra info, Mick. I&#39;ll be on the lookout for unpasteurized. . .and you&#39;re right--microbreweries are very popular.


  9. #9
    Katt's Avatar
    Katt is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Sanford, FL
    Posts
    316

    1

    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification


    As someone who is known to be gluten intolerant, I&#39;ve never had trouble with real beer. That I recall. At least, nothing like eating bread or cake.

    Start weight: 250 - 06/2009
    Current weight: 199
    Goal: 145

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •