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Thread: No Dairy - need Calcium page 3

  1. #21
    mike's Avatar
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    Here are two studies that I have found in adult women:

    Milk, dietary calcium, and bone fractures in women: a 12-year prospective study.

    CONCLUSIONS: These data do not support the hypothesis that higher consumption of milk or other food sources of calcium by adult women protects against hip or forearm fractures.


    Dietary calcium intake and risk of fracture and osteoporosis: prospective longitudinal cohort study

    Conclusion Gradual increases in dietary calcium intake above the first quintile in our female population were not associated with further reductions in fracture risk or osteoporosis.

  2. #22
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    Here are two reviews that show a connection between exercise and bone density and the probability of fall related fractures:

    The effects of progressive resistance training on bone density: a review. - Abstract - Europe PubMed Central
    Over the past 10 years, nearly two dozen cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have shown a direct and positive relationship between the effects of resistance training and bone density.

    Exercise interventions to reduce fall-related fractures and their risk factors in individuals with low bone density: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials - Springer
    Conclusions
    Exercise can reduce falls, fall-related fractures, and several risk factors for falls in individuals with low BMD. Exercise interventions for patients with osteoporosis should include weight-bearing activities, balance

    I haven't read all of these papers yet (but I will!) but it seems that exercise, especially weight bearing exercise, is more important for maintaining bone density than consuming dairy or calcium supplements.

  3. #23
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    Eat whole foods low in toxins, and make sure you get plenty of vitamin D3 and K2 (and I mean plenty). These vitamins are much more CRITICAL than ingesting a huge amount of calcium that will anyway get sub-optimally absorbed without the D3 (K2 "helps" D3 in other processes).

    If you are afraid of bone fractures, osteoporosis, etc, these vitamins are your preventive medicine. Make sure you eat them with their natural vehicle (fatty fish, full fat dairy, organic pastured eggs, etc). Don't focus on the calcium.

  4. #24
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    Calcium is required in huge amounts in the body, the only reason it gets a bad reputation is because people lack specific vitamins and minerals in their diet in order for it to perform its functions. Huge amounts of calcium without required calcium metabolites is certainly bad.

    Also, calcium in vegetables is poorly bioavailable, so you're likely getting much less than you assume unless you consume lots of dairy.
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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derpamix View Post
    Calcium is required in huge amounts in the body, the only reason it gets a bad reputation is because people lack specific vitamins and minerals in their diet in order for it to perform its functions. Huge amounts of calcium without required calcium metabolites is certainly bad.

    Also, calcium in vegetables is poorly bioavailable, so you're likely getting much less than you assume unless you consume lots of dairy.
    The up side is we don't excrete large amounts of calcium in a healthy metabolism, so provided conditions are right (healthy metabolism, correct blood ph, low toxins etc) we recycle most of our calcium and don't have a great need to add alot of external calcium.

    However if there is a problem with the re-uptake of calcium (kidneys, parathyroid) we can excrete it in large amounts creating a large daily deficit, this is the genesis of osteoporosis.

    Daily calcium intake has little to do with calcium problems in the body, as you mentioned derp, it has to do with the accompanying minerals and vitamin deficiencies and the factor I mentioned of poor calcium recycling due to certain metabolic issues.



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  6. #26
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    Pretty sure there is no real scientific data that dairy is good for your bones (reduced fractures). Didn't milk ads have to stop saying so awhile back due to no real proof?

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by statikcat View Post
    Pretty sure there is no real scientific data that dairy is good for your bones (reduced fractures). Didn't milk ads have to stop saying so awhile back due to no real proof?
    Most CW assumptions about nutrition have no scientific basis in reality.

  8. #28
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    However if there is a problem with the re-uptake of calcium (kidneys, parathyroid) we can excrete it in large amounts creating a large daily deficit, this is the genesis of osteoporosis.
    So.. How to you prevent/correct this scenario?

  9. #29
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    I would advise bone broth. Vitamin d3 and vit k2 supplements alongside weight training. If I didn't have a lot to do I could dig out the studies for you. Of course this assumes you haven't got any other disease issues.
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  10. #30
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    Uh what? Calcium is required for vitamin D to perform its functions for bone health, it helps absorb calcium and moves it to the right places -- along with K, magnesium, A, etc;
    The point is calcium deficits are pretty rare even without milk bonebroth or whatever same goes for Vitamine A, in contrary vitamin D3 deficency is severe in many people especially elderly. Same goes for K2 and Magnesium.
    For Bones you need Calcium,A,D,K2 and magnesium. Since Calcium and A is normally not a problem you should focus on the other three instead which are a problem for most people.
    That means supplementing D,K2 and magnesium is probably helpful and supplementing C and A is not even worse there is a lot of evidence that it is counterproductive.

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