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  1. #1
    Nick "the Caveman" M.'s Avatar
    Nick "the Caveman" M. is offline Senior Member
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    Spicy Avocado Sauce

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    I put this together one day when I was making fish tacos for the family....served on bib lettuce of course.

    Ingredients:
    1 whole avocado
    1 shallot
    1 habanero
    coconut oil (enough to coat pan....about 1 tbsp)
    2 tbsp lime juice
    cilantro to taste
    salt to taste
    black and white pepper to taste
    water for consistency

    Sautee the shallot and habanero in the coconut oil until the shallot starts to caramelize. Let cool down, the mixture may bind if cooled in fridge. In a food processor combine all the remaining ingredients and the habanero/shallot mixture. Add enough water for your personal desired consistency...I like it thick enough where you still need a spoon, but thin enough so it spreads easily. To keep, make sure to keep the pit when storing.

    I throw this on beef, buffalo, fish (all kinds), chicken, etc. It's got a good amount of heat and has a great flavor.

  2. #2
    KXS's Avatar
    KXS
    KXS is offline Member
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    sounds great-but what is this about storing with the pit???

  3. #3
    dml's Avatar
    dml
    dml is offline Senior Member
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    Using the pit is a standard trick to stop the avocado flesh from discoloring. If you ever want to use just half an avocado, just leave the pit in the unused half and it won't turn brown on you the way it would if you removed the pit.

  4. #4
    Grol's Avatar
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    Keeping the pit in guac is supposed to prevent browning. My Mexican avo pickers used to swear by the method. It's not worth arguing, but as someone who once had over 400 avocado trees, I can tell you it doesn't really work. The fruit browns from being exposed to oxygen. There's no magic preservative in the pit. Whipping it into guac is serious oxidizing. Squeezing in lime or lemon or even vinegar will prevent browning better than leaving the pit in. I've experimented with dozens of gallons of guac that we used to sell roadside. A gallon with ten pits in it browned just as fast as a gallon with no pits in it. What the pit did do according to one experiment (I refuse to call this a study), was raise the physical level of the guac in its container so the plastic cover touched it, thus reducing oxygen exposure and delaying browning. They gave the pit credit when the seal made the difference. For really long lived guac, ditch the pit, squeeze lime right over the top before storing and gently push a plastic wrap cover ONto the guac disbursing the lime juice for complete coverage. Sealed baggies with all the air removed also do quite well, but the lime topping seems best. Of course, you may be averse to plastic and that's another issue, but I'm sure you can figure out something.

    Most importantly, eat your guac fresh. I think it's best mixed with your favorite recipe, allowed to cool in the fridge for about an hour to get the flavors incorporated then eaten within the next hour. It can deteriorate pretty fast.

    If you like spicy -- Nick's sauce over carne asada or carnitas is probably wicked good. Habanero's ain't foolin' around though.

  5. #5
    goeyj's Avatar
    goeyj is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick "the Caveman" M. View Post
    I put this together one day when I was making fish tacos for the family....served on bib lettuce of course.

    Ingredients:
    1 whole avocado
    1 shallot
    1 habanero
    coconut oil (enough to coat pan....about 1 tbsp)
    2 tbsp lime juice
    cilantro to taste
    salt to taste
    black and white pepper to taste
    water for consistency

    Sautee the shallot and habanero in the coconut oil until the shallot starts to caramelize. Let cool down, the mixture may bind if cooled in fridge. In a food processor combine all the remaining ingredients and the habanero/shallot mixture. Add enough water for your personal desired consistency...I like it thick enough where you still need a spoon, but thin enough so it spreads easily. To keep, make sure to keep the pit when storing.

    I throw this on beef, buffalo, fish (all kinds), chicken, etc. It's got a good amount of heat and has a great flavor.
    Great recipe! I made it with a few revisions because I didn't have the shallots or habaneros. I used a serrano pepper and 1/4 a regular onion with a little added garlic. Tasted great over some steak! Thanks for posting.

  6. #6
    lil_earthmomma's Avatar
    lil_earthmomma is offline Senior Member
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    Oooh I'm making this tomorrow on chicken! Yum yummy!

  7. #7
    nuttykitchen's Avatar
    nuttykitchen is offline Senior Member
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    Oh, thanks for this. Making it for lunch. :-)
    Nutty Kitchen

    cook for life!

  8. #8
    ikaika's Avatar
    ikaika is offline Senior Member
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    The pit thing doesn't work-- storing a cut avocado in a closed tub with a half of a CUT OPEN onion does. it does something to the air or somesuch. I don't think it works with guac/pureed avocado though.

    -写

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