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Thread: To much spinanch? page

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    mikebike's Avatar
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    To much spinanch?

    Do you think there's any danger to eating a lot of spinach? I eat quite a bit. I use it as a base for salads or any type of asian type dish, instead of rice. I go through 16oz a week.

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    Nasno's Avatar
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    I do about a pound and a half to two pounds of raw spinach a week. I've found I prefer it to lettuce and mixed greens. No ill effects, but I do realize that cooking/combining spinach will extract better nutritional results.

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    If I recall, the oxalic acid in raw spinach can contribute to kidney stones. I don't think there are problems with cooked.
    Started PB late 2008, lost 50 lbs by late 2009. Have been plateaued, but that thing may just be biting the dust: more on that later.

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    I am salt-retensive and can have a problem with hypertension. Spinach is one of the vegetables with a lot of salt. Shame, because I like it too much. It takes a lot--a whole lot ---to give me a problem but I try to substitute with other things anyway. There is a weed called lamb's quarter that has all of the flavor that spinach aspires to possess. In the wild, the cows beat me to it all the time, but I started growing my own in my garden.

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    Quote Originally Posted by periquin View Post
    I am salt-retensive and can have a problem with hypertension. Spinach is one of the vegetables with a lot of salt. Shame, because I like it too much. It takes a lot--a whole lot ---to give me a problem but I try to substitute with other things anyway. There is a weed called lamb's quarter that has all of the flavor that spinach aspires to possess. In the wild, the cows beat me to it all the time, but I started growing my own in my garden.
    When I was young, we had this lovely "weed" growing in our backyard. It's nowhere to be found nowdays. Too bad: it's good stuff.
    Started PB late 2008, lost 50 lbs by late 2009. Have been plateaued, but that thing may just be biting the dust: more on that later.

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    You're fine.

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    periquin's Avatar
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    Tangentrider: Was it a smokin' or eatin' weed?

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    Hello Kitty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikebike View Post
    I go through 16oz a week.
    Last night I ate a BASS (big @ss spinach salad) with lots of other veggies, and then I piled on one whole bunch of cooked (wilted) spinach (well you know it shrinks down to nothin'), then topped it with a generous helping of leftover shredded beef. I should probably cut back. On the spinach, not the beef.

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    Bukawww's Avatar
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    Only if you have a blood clotting disorder or take blood thinning medication

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    Helen in Oz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tangentrider View Post
    If I recall, the oxalic acid in raw spinach can contribute to kidney stones. I don't think there are problems with cooked.
    AFAIK only an issue if you're prone to kidney stones or oxalate-related pain issues. I had read a comment that the 'organic' oxalates in raw foods were less harmful than the 'inorganic' in cooked however I can't find any study to support this. The following suggests that boiling is indeed the best way to reduce oxalates.

    http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf048128d

    Try choosing baby spinach leaves or use Asian greens such as Bok Choy for a lower-oxalate alternative.

    Interestingly some studies report that oxalates bind the calcium in spinach and make it unavailable, but do not bind to the calcium in other foods; while I've also seen a study that shows that dairy consumed with spinach does significantly reduce the free oxalates (and consequently you'd think the calcium also).

    I'm reminded of Pollan's thoughts on the wisdom of traditional foods.... Greek Spanikopita, spinach with fetta cheese. Yum!

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