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  1. #1
    Hotmail's Avatar
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    Exercise with Knee injury

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    I have a bit of a knee injury, I had difficult going up the stairs, but now its not too bad, and I can walk fine. But I have problems doing squats kind of movement, all gym exercises / classes seems to involve squats, lunges or bike (the bike is what caused the injury in the first place)

    Can anyone suggest an efficient exercise until my knee is better (I believe it should be fine in about a month or so)?

    Would weight machines and focusing on my upper body any good? My goal is fat loss, and I have only been exercising recently (suppose hence the reason for my injury has anyone used just weight machines and actually saw results - e.g. fat loss and muscle definition?

    The exercise I could possibly do is pilate and yoga, but not sure those have any effect really!

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    RichMahogany's Avatar
    RichMahogany is online now Senior Member
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    What was the injury?

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    Hotmail's Avatar
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    Didn't go to any professional, all I know is that it started to hurt in my left knee when going up the stairs, and squatting is painful - I can do about half a squat. Also walking is no problem at all. Now after 3 weeks going up the stairs is fine, its just squatting that is painful on the knee.

    I had a similar knee injury a few years ago, also cause by using the stationary bike (too many spin / RPM classes) that time I didn't pay too much attention and it got bad and swollen, but this time I caught it early and stopped using the bike.

  4. #4
    RichMahogany's Avatar
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    Well, certainly don't do half squats. Not sure how much more than that anybody can say without resorting to wild speculation.

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    You may want to get your knee checked to make sure you don't have a meniscus tear, or something similar. (I thought I had just done something minor to my knee, but it turned out I tore the ACL. It's now six months post-surgery, and I'm still two months out from returning to normal activity.) Until you know whether you have a serious injury, it might be best to hold off lifting weights.
    F, 43 years old, 4 feet 11.5 inches (yes, that half inch matters!)

    **First-ever 5K race 11/28/13: 37 minutes, 18+ seconds, no stopping**

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    If it's fine walking but hurts going up stairs you most likely have runner's knee. Google it and do some checking. I have suffered with this and didn't do too much harm by carrying on running and taking ginger as an anti inflammatory. I had it quite bad in March but still managed a trail marathon a couple of weeks ago. Knees are hellish complicated and even physios don't seem to know what they are doing. Your injury will be unique and only you will know what you can get away with doing through trial and error. Resting isn't always best as it isn't adaptive. Resting is necessary if you are making it worse over the longer term.

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    Thanks, I think I may go to the gym and use weight /resistance machines, especially will focus on upper body and only do movements that are comfortable to my knees.

    Thing is I am disappointed as everyone thinks weight machines are not effective, but I shoudl try those, will also try to go to pilate/yoga for the next week or two to see how it goes. I am going hiking in about 10 days, so I need to feel good by then.

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    The virtues of seated leg extensions are extolled by some as they do work the vastus medialis which can be weak in some athletes. It may help stabilise the knee but like I said...lots of opinions and no consensus. Do what's right for you. I do a lot of work on hip strength as this stops my stride from getting lazy and helps keep my knees aligned when tired. A pulley machine with leg strap or a band can help here. Most knee problems have their root cause elsewhere. Lack of flexibility in hamstrings, hip flexors, IT band... the list goes on

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    Thanks Macey, I didn't understand all the information you wrote lol, but I get what you say abotu doing what feels best for me.

  10. #10
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    I disagree with only doing what's comfortable. That's a good way to make an acute injury into a chronic problem. If it's safe to do so, you will stimulate the ability to produce force through a full range of motion by producing force through a full range of motion. The Bill Starr Rehab Protocol (Google that) applies to muscle belly injuries, but the theory behind it may apply, depending on the nature of your injury.

    Here's a quote in response to a back injury from a guy who's walked a ton of athletes through the rehab process successfully. Again, we don't know the nature of your injury so this is not to be construed as anything other than information to set you about doing your own research and making your own decision based on your particulars

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe
    Everything except cancer heals, one way or another.. Injured tissue is still tissue -- it is composed of living cells that receive signals from their physiological and mechanical environment, and respond to these signals. This is the stress/adaptation response. You will not be the first one to force your back to heal if you make small jumps and use perfect form. I do not know the precise details of your injury, but it seems that you have 2 choices, surgery or rehab
    Last edited by RichMahogany; 07-03-2013 at 05:46 AM. Reason: Add a Rippetoe quote, to make Gorbag flip out

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