Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 51

Thread: Einkorn, the original Wheat - OK for Celiacs? page

  1. #1
    Cryptocode's Avatar
    Cryptocode is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Norco, California
    Posts
    1,341

    Einkorn, the original Wheat - OK for Celiacs?

    Primal Fuel
    Lack of intestinal mucosal toxicity of... [Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006] - PubMed - NCBI

    Maybe it is. Most production in the US is for birdseed. The birds eat better than we do.

    How to bake with it: http://foodloveswriting.com/2013/01/...korn-giveaway/
    I've read that it doesn't rise as much as today's hybred flours but I wonder if this is worth a try.

    Baking bread the old fashioned way is dead easy and takes almost no kneading; certainly no machine. But it does require a few hours of time during which the dough 'rests'.

    Has anyone tried this?
    Last edited by Cryptocode; 06-26-2013 at 08:21 PM.
    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

  2. #2
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    5,426
    I wouldn't eat it. I have a very low tolerance for risk. It's not worth it to me.

  3. #3
    Cryptocode's Avatar
    Cryptocode is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Norco, California
    Posts
    1,341
    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    I wouldn't eat it. I have a very low tolerance for risk. It's not worth it to me.
    I certainly agree with that. But I was wondering what it taste like in bread and how it cooks. I'm amazed that it's still possible to buy it. It's also possible to buy emmer wheat but there are many kinds and I haven't taken the trouble to find the earliest one. The Landrace types from Turkey and near there are a later variety.

    And truthfully, I do sometimes cheat and eat an English Muffin (commercial). This would probably be a lot healthier than that.
    Last edited by Cryptocode; 06-26-2013 at 08:40 PM.
    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

  4. #4
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    5,426
    My guess is it would make heavy, solid bread. Think the sort of coarse flatbread that Roman soldiers may have eaten. It's low in gluten, so it won't rise much.

  5. #5
    Cryptocode's Avatar
    Cryptocode is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Norco, California
    Posts
    1,341
    I'm inagining women pounding stones on kernals and eating a fair amount of stone grit with it. Doesn't really sound too good, yet I'm curious. Apparently it's difficult to seperate from the chaff and from the outer hull. But just buying stone-ground Einkorn four avoids all that.
    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

  6. #6
    cori93437's Avatar
    cori93437 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    central FL
    Posts
    6,715
    Because of my autoimmune disease/wheat issues I also certainly wouldn't go there...

    But I think that if people in general want to eat wheat and grains the old ones such as this is exactly where they should go, as well as old forms of preparation like soaking and sourdough.

    I think it would cut down on many of the issues that are most likely becoming more prevalent because of GM grains.
    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
    ~Friedrich Nietzsche
    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.


  7. #7
    Cryptocode's Avatar
    Cryptocode is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Norco, California
    Posts
    1,341
    Cori, I have read the Weston A. Price pages on soaking, sprouting, and souring. Basically it sounds like a lot of work. You'd have to be someone who regularly baked bread and were committed to it, or just enjoyed the baking process a lot. That's not me. If I were going to blow it somewhere I'd probably go the route of soaking legumes.

    Still, having read and heard so much about the original wheat, it falls (almost) into the grass-fed beef stlye of eating. Almost, but not quite.

    http://www.einkorn.com/toxicity-of-einkorn-gluten/
    Last edited by Cryptocode; 06-26-2013 at 08:51 PM.
    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

  8. #8
    cori93437's Avatar
    cori93437 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    central FL
    Posts
    6,715
    Meh... I think I could live without the sprouting TBH.

    And with soaking/souring it's really no work at all. You put things in a bowl, you leave them, you come back and touch them again later and use them for the next step... it's like making kefir.
    Mostly you just leave it alone. It sounds like work, but it's doing the work while you are at work yourself, out hiking, or sitting on MDA.
    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
    ~Friedrich Nietzsche
    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.


  9. #9
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    5,426
    I used to make bread from rye I sprouted myself and natural yeast fermented from the soaking water. It was very tasty.

    But despite the dedication of the WAP people to soaking, sprouting, and fermenting grains, I have never once seen an analysis that shows that bread made by those methods are reliably gluten free. I have never seen any analysis of such bread at all. That's what it would take for me to consider eating any cereal grain product.

  10. #10
    MEversbergII's Avatar
    MEversbergII is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lexington Park, MD
    Posts
    2,236
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    I'll give it a try when I get a chance.

    M.

Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •