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Thread: Einkorn, the original Wheat - OK for Celiacs? page 2

  1. #11
    Kochin's Avatar
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    Einkorn is good, but contains more allergens than spelt. When I have grain in any amount it's usually spelt, due to availability and the fact it causes no harm to me at all.

    HOWEVER, for coeliacs neither may be good enough. Both still contain gluten. Best avoided if you're especially intolerant or truly allergic.
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by MEversbergII View Post
    I'll give it a try when I get a chance.

    M.
    Great! Be sure to let us know what happened and how it is, Please.
    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

  3. #13
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    I'll try. Pretty pricey, and my OCD demands I grind that shiz by hand after sprouting...which I've never done before. Querns costs 1,000...hm.

    I may also give spelt a go. Roman citizens apparently ate spelt, and I'm all for reconstructive archaeology.

    M.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by MEversbergII View Post
    I'll try. Pretty pricey, and my OCD demands I grind that shiz by hand after sprouting...which I've never done before. Querns costs 1,000...hm.
    I used to grind fresh sprouted rye in a blender. It's soft and doesn't require a mill. Of course, at that point I added wheat flour, because sprouted rye in itself didn't have enough gluten to make a proper loaf of bread. Those were the days.

  5. #15
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    Prime Grains 1 lb $2.24 + shipping

    It's now at Whole Foods, but it may not be stone ground. Einkorn now in Whole Foods | Track Your Plaque Blog . Tropical Traditions also does not say, but it does say it's 'extracted' which doesn't sound good.

    Demeter Farm Mill | Growers & Suppliers

    http://eorganic.info/sites/eorganic....0Handout_0.pdf Einkorn, Emmer and Spelt are all very different.
    Last edited by Cryptocode; 06-27-2013 at 09:06 PM.
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  6. #16
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    Cryptocode, cheers.

    You guys are having a negative influence on my dietary decisions D: (I kid) I'll see what's at my local health food store next Friday.

    M.

  7. #17
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    LOL, I hope not. But I really appreciate your offer and am most curious as to how the baking effort turns out.
    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

  8. #18
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    Einkorn is like most plants in that it is a diploid meaning it contains 2 sets of chromosomes. About 2,000 years after einkorn wheat, emmer wheat was created by the hybridization of 2 wild grasses. Consequently, emmer has 4 sets of chromosomes. Kamut and Durum wheat are both descendents of emmer.

    Spelt is the result of hybridization between cultivated emmer and another wild grass and so contains six sets of chromosomes. Modern wheat is a descendent of spelt.

    Note that while extensive hybridization of wheat has occurred over the millenia, there is currently no genetically modified wheat on the market.

    As you can see, einkorn is the purest and most ancient form of wheat available as it only has 2 sets of chromosomes and is naturally very low in gluten!
    The 4 Reasons Why I’m Switching to Einkorn Wheat

    Here you can buy already baked Einkorn bread (but it has maple syrup in it), or bread mix. The flour is not stone-ground though. The loaf of bread looks great and it has clearly risin sufficiently.
    Einkorn

    An n=1 experiment http://pathsofwrighteousness.wordpre...ad-experiment/

    Lots of Einkorn recipes http://pinterest.com/skinwellness/starch-einkorn-wheat/

    Sprouting Einkorn berries http://politicallyincorrecthealth.co...wheat-berries/. That doesn't look too bad. But now there's no way to have it stone-ground. And I'm sure not going to do it by hand.

    Sourdough baker, it's interesting the way people find their calling in life: http://politicallyincorrecthealth.co...wheat-berries/, http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/326...rain-sourdough
    Last edited by Cryptocode; 06-29-2013 at 12:59 PM.
    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

  9. #19
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    I'd take the sourdough route. It's the only bread I've ever truly loved. After I get the flour (which, as it will be preground is likely rancid), I'll take some time to make my starter. Likely, if all goes well I'll distribute loafs to my grain-eating compadres, as it'll be better for them than whatever they're using now I'd guess. Also, my SO likes sourdough.

    Good point on Spelt -> Modern wheat. Spelt was what the Roman Empire brought with them as they moved north, which displaced Gaulish rye if I'm not mistaken. Still sketchy on that. I wonder what Egypt was growing during the latter years of the republic - they provided most of the grain. I remember millet was still consumed by the poor still.

    M.

  10. #20
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    Interesting. Egypt did a lot of trading all around the mediterranean, so maybe they ate what the Romans did, and traded it to them. Or maybe Rome got some from the middle east where they grew emmer.

    Yesterday at the grocery store I picked up a loaf of ciabatta bread for my husband. When I got home and was moving it to an airtight bag I read the label. It's about 50% whole wheat and 50% spelt. Amazing. Someone's paying attention. At the bottom of the label where they give warnings for allergens it says "contains Wheat'. Maybe that part is getting common now.
    Last edited by Cryptocode; 07-01-2013 at 09:28 PM.
    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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