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Thread: What type of cookware to use? page 2

  1. #11
    RichMahogany's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FedorandBjPenn View Post
    Im concerned about chemicals leaching into food. And toxins. Was wondering what you allcook with.
    Cast iron is safe and glass is safe. Cast iron is cooler. Glass can be convenient for certain purposes, like microwaving rice. Stay away from heating food in anything containing plastic, aluminum, or deathlon(tm).

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by FedorandBjPenn View Post
    Im concerned about chemicals leaching into food. And toxins. Was wondering what you allcook with.
    well as for chemicals... dont use anything easily reactive ( most that is easily reactive also melts, so that is mostly taken care of)

    Stoneware - make certain it is unglazed. not very good for ALL uses but fine for specific uses Grade c- for overall cooking

    Ceramic - non reactive, takes the place of stoneware for most uses. cannot be used on a fire, High heat resistance - high break resistance
    Glass - non reactive, not very useful outside the oven - medium break, medium heat. choose ceramic over glass

    Cast iron - requires "seaoning" and is then reasonably non reactive ( do not use acidic foods in, tomatoes ). never wash, extreme heat resistance, non breakable

    Forged - requires "seaoning" and is then reasonably non reactive ( do not use acidic foods in, tomatoes ). never wash, extreme heat resistance, non breakable - better finish, use for item which stick ( eggs, etc)

    i would recommend one pan for seafood ( if you eat seafood) and on for all other meats ( i can never seem to get fish smell/cast out of cast iron)

    porcelain covered cast iron good for acid containing foods like above tomatoes
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    Cast iron is safe and glass is safe. Cast iron is cooler. Glass can be convenient for certain purposes, like microwaving rice. Stay away from heating food in anything containing plastic, aluminum, or deathlon(tm).
    so i goggled deathlon could not find it then realize you mean teflon and i laughed
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  4. #14
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    What do you guys use to.cook your meats?

  5. #15
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    From what ive read stainless steel and.cast.iron.seem.to.be the healthiest

  6. #16
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    every single day i use my cast iron skillet or my stainless steel sauce pot or my ceramic crock pot
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  7. #17
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    Cool so for baking chicken in the oven the.safest.cookware is???? Glass, cast.iron?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by FedorandBjPenn View Post
    Cool so for baking chicken in the oven the.safest.cookware is???? Glass, cast.iron?
    and now you have played that question once too many times

    end of conversation
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  9. #19
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    Different cookware is good for different preparations. There's no single "best cookware." Teflon is toxic, the jury is out on bare aluminum, and bare copper is no good (but you'll probably only see bare copper pots for making jam). Stay away from those three. Pretty much everything else is COMPLETELY SAFE. Don't worry too much about it.

    The best cookware depends on what you're doing. Just baking, you're completely fine with pretty much anything. Go with personal preference. I usually just use a cast-iron skillet.

    Cast-iron will hold heat well, but tends to be slow to react to heat changes. It's best for searing (because it heats up without hot spots) and braising (because it holds in heat). Bare cast-iron leeches iron into food, which most people consider a good thing. However, it does react with acidic foods, so you shouldn't cook things like tomato sauce or stews made with wine in bare case-iron. Enameled cast-iron is better for this purpose (I like Le Creuset, although Staub is also great, and Lodge make a great budget enameled cast-iron dutch oven).

    Stainless steel is also slow to react to heat changes. Additionally, the thinner it is, the more likely you are to have hot-spots. However, it's cheap and doesn't react with foods, so that's nice. Sometimes you'll find stainless steel with copper bottoms, which attenuates the hot spots and makes the pan quicker to respond. I recommend these copper bottom pans over regular stainless for sautéing and pan roasting. Plain stainless is fine for boiling/poaching/blanching/steaming, because the heat of the water is what regulates the temperature.

    Clad stainless steel is kind of the gold-standard for me: it's fast-reacting aluminum sandwiched between two layers of stainless steel. It doesn't react with food, it's quick to respond, and doesn't get many hot spots. This is what I use for sautéing and pan roasting. All Clad is my favorite, but Tramontina makes a budget line (available at Wal-Mart).

    Tinned copper is the quickest to respond to changes in heat, and is perfect for delicate sauces. However, it's annoying to clean, and you need to get it retinned constantly, or else the copper will react with your food. Also, the copper will develop a (harmless) patina, which you'll probably want to polish and that's annoying. Plus, copper is by far the most expensive (we're talking over a grand for a set), so probably not worth it.

    Porcelain and glass are fine for baking. Don't use them on the stovetop and you're fine. There have been some quality control issues with newer pyrex (take it out of the fridge and put it in a hot oven and it might explode), so use it mindfully (or just buy vintage).

  10. #20
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    Recently received a "stonewell"frying pan. No oil, butter, grease, nothing sticks to it. It's pantastic.
    Last edited by Sol blackcat; 06-29-2013 at 06:33 PM.

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