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  1. #11
    RichMahogany's Avatar
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    Do the same workout that made you sore with 80% of the weight you used last time. Warm up really well first. And epsom salt baths.

  2. #12
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    The only DOMS I have experienced of any note is when the day after a hard workout (first time back doing squats for years), even though experiencing muscle soreness, I followed with my usual 4.5 mile walk, which left me practically unable to walk at all.

    Exercising when experiencing muscle soreness results in longer recovery time from that soreness or increased soreness. It never results in any sort of improvement for me.

    In the end I decided to not exercise the same body part again until the soreness has gone away.

    This has eliminated DOMS, too. Imagine that!

    Pushing through the pain is for people who give themselves points for enduring pain.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    The only DOMS I have experienced of any note is when the day after a hard workout (first time back doing squats for years), even though experiencing muscle soreness, I followed with my usual 4.5 mile walk, which left me practically unable to walk at all.
    DOMS should not be an ongoing issue if you're actually Training (as opposed to exercising). It's not a very well-understood phenomenon, but it has consistently been shown to result mostly from the eccentric portion of the lift, and is pronounced in people performing exercises to which they are not accustomed.

    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    Exercising when experiencing muscle soreness results in longer recovery time from that soreness or increased soreness. It never results in any sort of improvement for me.
    That's the opposite of what most people experience. Not saying it isn't true for you, but it's not true in general.


    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    In the end I decided to not exercise the same body part again until the soreness has gone away.

    This has eliminated DOMS, too. Imagine that!
    Repeating the same exercises until you're accustomed to them is what eliminated your DOMS.

    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    Pushing through the pain is for people who give themselves points for enduring pain.
    Soreness is uncomfortable (from mildly to severly), but it's not the same as pain, in my book. Pushing through true pain (e.g. injury) is usually a bad idea (not always true for muscle belly injuries), but pushing through soreness actually tends to alleviate soreness.

    I repeat my advice. Same workout. 80% of previous weight.

  4. #14
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    Soreness is uncomfortable (from mildly to severly), but it's not the same as pain, in my book. Pushing through true pain (e.g. injury) is usually a bad idea (not always true for muscle belly injuries), but pushing through soreness actually tends to alleviate soreness.

    I repeat my advice. Same workout. 80% of previous weight.
    I agree with Rich. There is a difference between pain and soreness; if you wait until you're not sore to do a particular lift again, you're probably going to always be sore after you do that lift. Doing some reps at a lighter weight should help... unless you actually are INJURED, in which case obviously it is a bad idea. Learning the difference between the two is something most serious lifters are going to have to do, IMO.

  5. #15
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    Follow basic recovery rules and DOMS will lessen or disappear completely...

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomingno View Post
    I agree with Rich. There is a difference between pain and soreness; if you wait until you're not sore to do a particular lift again, you're probably going to always be sore after you do that lift. Doing some reps at a lighter weight should help... unless you actually are INJURED, in which case obviously it is a bad idea. Learning the difference between the two is something most serious lifters are going to have to do, IMO.
    I don't know where you get this from. It is absolutely untrue. But if you believe it to be true, I'm sure you wouldn't do it any other way.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    Soreness is uncomfortable (from mildly to severly), but it's not the same as pain, in my book. Pushing through true pain (e.g. injury) is usually a bad idea (not always true for muscle belly injuries), but pushing through soreness actually tends to alleviate soreness.
    Then on the other hand there were times when working through muscle soreness resulted in a torn muscle. I prefer to avoid such things. It's not always possible to adjust a workout to a certain percent of load if it's not using graduated weights.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    Then on the other hand there were times when working through muscle soreness resulted in a torn muscle.
    For you? Because again, this has not been observed in the general population.

    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    I prefer to avoid such things.
    Can you provide even so much as a proposed mechanism by which sore muscles magically tear? Millions of people work out sore every day without tearing muscles. This is not a valid concern.

    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    It's not always possible to adjust a workout to a certain percent of load if it's not using graduated weights.
    That's certainly a valid criticism of non-barbell based workout regimens, but we've done this dance many, many times recently.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    I don't know where you get this from. It is absolutely untrue. But if you believe it to be true, I'm sure you wouldn't do it any other way.
    Well it is certainly not absolutely untrue, because that is pretty much my experience. Especially with squatting. Regular workouts, even with increasing weight, resulted in less soreness overall. I must be some sort of mutant...

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    For you? Because again, this has not been observed in the general population.
    Yep. Happened to me.

    Can you provide even so much as a proposed mechanism by which sore muscles magically tear? Millions of people work out sore every day without tearing muscles. This is not a valid concern.
    A weakened area is not given time to heal before the next load. How hard is that to imagine?

    That's certainly a valid criticism of non-barbell based workout regimens, but we've done this dance many, many times recently.
    Really? So the cure was giving up sports?

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