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  1. #11
    Aldergirl's Avatar
    Aldergirl is offline Senior Member
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    Fire stations, oddly enough, usually have someone there to take your blood pressure for you. At least, they do here in Washington. I never would have known if a drugstore pharmacist hadn't pointed me in that direction. So, check and see if your local fire stations take blood pressure, if you really want it checked.

    And, as everyone else said, don't worry about changes like that as your body adjusts to healthier eating!

  2. #12
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    I was going to suggest your local fire department also. I don't see the home machines being any better. The issue with buying your own machine, is it will work just fine when you first get it. But in very short order they go out of whack, and then you have to buy another. It would be cheaper and more accurate to just have your local fireman or Paramedic take it manually.

  3. #13
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    I am a doctor, and if I were to get a reading like yours from a machine it would be an instant tip-off that it isn't reading it correctly. The chances that you in reality have only 22mmHg difference between your systolic and diastolic are very low....what it would mean is that you may have less elasticity of your vessels, such that even when your heart is not in ejection phase it isn't able to distend the vessel very much...I assume you are not a smoker. It's common in them.

    More than likely you just have the opposite to the above, which is that you have a really STRONG LIKE BULL heart When you have a cheap machine, its main problem is that it doesn't detect true peaks and valleys in the pressure. It takes a lot of roundabout readings and averages them....this is especially true if you have a slow, strong pulse, because it counts on a correction factor that doesn't apply to very strong or weak pulses.

    I.E. If I had a dollar for every elderly 80's+ woman that went to one of those and got a reading like 77/35 I could retire.

    Frantic elderly woman: "Doc, I GOT THIS AT THE STORE!!! I AM DYING!!!!"
    Me: "No. You would already be long-dead. That doesn't sustain life. Stop getting your health checked at the same place you buy your toilet paper."

    The ideas above are great to get it done yourself. I would not be worried

  4. #14
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    Thanks! I actually have fire dept across the street. I'll ask.

  5. #15
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    Normally low carb will reduce BP - this a bit of worry for you.

    You're close to hypotension at 60 ( too low BP) - low carb may get you dizzy/weak/tired by dropping BP even further.

    I think I would prefer the 88

  6. #16
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    There is nothing wrong with a Diastolic of 60. It's better than 88.

  7. #17
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    A common medication inducing cut-off for a diastolic pressure is once it gets to around 55, but this has many caveats. It is very common to see athletes with BP's fo 115/60. This is very healthy and implies that the heart is strong enough to get that kind of systolic, but the arteries are distending a lot (good elasticity) when the heart is in rest phase.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by workinprogress View Post
    There is nothing wrong with a Diastolic of 60. It's better than 88.
    Yes unless a slight drop of 2 to 58 (maybe after meals or certain food) causes weakness/dizziness/tiredness which it does in many people.

    Secondly of your high carb 60 becomes a low carb 55 then you could be dizzy all the time ( not the same for everyone though).

    If this happens (if!) - then there's plenty wrong with this situation.
    Last edited by EatMoveSleep; 06-22-2013 at 09:36 PM.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheyCallMeLazarus View Post
    A common medication inducing cut-off for a diastolic pressure is once it gets to around 55, but this has many caveats. It is very common to see athletes with BP's fo 115/60. This is very healthy and implies that the heart is strong enough to get that kind of systolic, but the arteries are distending a lot (good elasticity) when the heart is in rest phase.

    55 cut off : ok but I guess if patient starts getting dizzy at 65 then for that patient it's too low ( one of the caveats I guess).

    115/60 for athletes : yes but they are athletes, I'd guess there BP would increase to their normal level when they retire ( and often to high BP later in life)

    I know people with usual BP of. 110/55 ( they're by no means athletes - ordinary day to day tasks are an effort enough for them).

    Mine now is typically 115/65 - I really don't like my BP lower than 60 ( doesn't feel so good).

    Everyone is different.
    Last edited by EatMoveSleep; 06-22-2013 at 09:50 PM.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    55 cut off : ok but I guess if patient starts getting dizzy at 65 then for that patient it's too low ( one of the caveats I guess).

    115/60 for athletes : yes but they are athletes, I'd guess there BP would increase to their normal level when they retire ( and often to high BP later in life)

    I know people with usual BP of. 110/55 ( they're by no means athletes - ordinary day to day tasks are an effort enough for them).

    Mine now is typically 115/65 - I really don't like my BP lower than 60 ( doesn't feel so good).

    Everyone is different.
    You seem to be making a lot of assumptions. If I'm wrong I apologize. But I've regularly taken care of little old ladies with blood pressures of 100-120 over 1-2. Literally when I'm taking their pressure you can clearly hear the systolic phase, and as you release the pressure you hear the diastolic phase all the way down to single digits. They had no complaints of dizziness, they weren't athletes of any sort. I'm caring for them for completely different reasons unrelated to their B/P.

    It's a pretty big leap to say that someone is going to have problems just because their diastolic is below an arbitrary number. If you were having issues yourself, that only really counts for you. It could have been another issue that caused your dizziness and lower diastolic at the same time.

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