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Thread: Organic beef gets a bigger wrap than organic pork page

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    sting's Avatar
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    Organic beef gets a bigger wrap than organic pork

    Primal Fuel
    J Stanton quote: Favor ruminants—animals that eat grass and leaves. (That means red meat: beef, lamb, bison, elk, venison, goat.) Ruminants are far better at converting plants into essential fats, complete protein, and bioavailable nutrients than humans are.

    Pork and chicken are permissible in moderation, but are far less healthy due to excessive omega-6 fat content.

    “Eat Like A Predator, Not Like Prey”: The Paleo Diet In Six Easy Steps, A Motivational Guide - GNOLLS.ORG

    Which do you prefer?

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    picklepete is offline Senior Member
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    If it's pastured I have no preference and enjoy rotating variety.

    In the US, finding pastured beef/bison/sheep is generally easier than finding pastured hogs and birds. If I have an itch for pork or poultry I'll get a lean cut and prepare it with a cream sauce or guacamole--the protein fraction is the same.
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    JoanieL is offline Senior Member
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    I like just about all sources of protein. I know that chicken and pig aren't quite as healthy as cows, bison, goats, lamb, etc. I don't go out of my way for chicken and pig, but if a healthy source is conveniently available, I'll buy it. I love pork, and I do really like the occasional baked whole chicken.

    There's a restaurant here that, rumor has it, was so disenchanted by the way pigs were being raised, they bought a pig farm and completely revamped it to produce a healthier product. They're also trying to breed a pig that has a lot of lard/fat over the kidneys which is the gold standard of lard (I thing it's called Leaf Lard). Sadly, I don't have the money to buy a pig farm.
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    We don't eat much pork or chicken simply because I find it hard to believe that even if they're pastured, (truly and fully) that as omnivores they are getting enough protein naturally, without being fed commercial grains (read corn). But yesterday I found a nice looking rack of spare ribs and they were delicious.

    Also, I look for what used to be called 'fryers'. Fryers have to weight under 2.5 lbs. If I find one, which is pretty rare, we'll roast it for some variety.
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    Rotate. Yesterday was eggs and bacon, then hamburgers, then spare ribs. I don't do much chicken actually. Unless eggs count.

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    The problem with pork imo is that pigs will be fed supplemental grain. There's no 100% grass fed pig.
    We can still pick and chose something from a local farm, which would be still a considerable step up from grocery store factory pork, which is likely to have been fed mostly soy.

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    the same is true of pastured chickens. on a farm of any size no way they're subsisting on bugs and grubs. best you can hope is they get non-gmo, clean feed.
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    – Ernest Hemingway

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    For pork you want to look for "Forested Pig" I think that is the same as "Grassfeed Beef" in the Beef world. Pigs natural place is in the light woods like wild Pigs. I don't think there is such a thing as pastured pork without grains.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Graycat View Post
    The problem with pork imo is that pigs will be fed supplemental grain. There's no 100% grass fed pig.
    We can still pick and chose something from a local farm, which would be still a considerable step up from grocery store factory pork, which is likely to have been fed mostly soy.
    Pigs are naturally omnivores and will eat fruit, fungi, tubers, bugs, and even small mammals from time to time. There is no such thing as a 100% grass-fed pig, even when NOT supplemented with any grain feed (which is pretty rare not to happen at least a little bit).

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    Bummer. Most of my meat intake is currently pork (sausage and bacon ).

    M.

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