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  1. #1
    sonialanc's Avatar
    sonialanc is offline Junior Member
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    Glucose tolerance test

    Hello
    I hope someone will be able to help me. A year ago I ended up going for a glucose tolerance test as my fasting glucose levels were elevated. My GTT was also high, indicating I could have diabetes. I had a HbA1c which was only 4.6 so the dr concluded I didn't infact have diabetes but that I should return for another GTT in a years time. Since then I have lost 14kg and follow a low carb diet, as a result my fasting glucose was 4.8 and considered normal, this was done through my naturopath but a copy of the results was sent to the Gp. Now I have received a request for a GTT as its a year since the last one. I don't really want to go for one as I feel this test bares no resemblance to what I eat and real life and I don't want to be labelled a diabetic on the result of this false test. Does anyone know how my body might respond to this test? Or been through a similar issue?

    Thanks

    Worried Sonia

  2. #2
    dkJames's Avatar
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    If you became much more insulin sensitive than 1 year ago, I see no reason why you would fear taking the test again. If it were me, I would be very curious to see if my glucose tolerance had changed. If you are afraid of the result, then take a bit of resistant starch (like raw potato starch powder) for a couple of weeks, maybe 2Tbsp after each evening meal. Once you go over the flatulence phase (no joke, you need to adapt - new bacteria populating your colon), you'll be surprised by the magic of RS and blood sugar levels after a carby meal ...

  3. #3
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    Robb Wolf just had a post on this topic, maybe a month ago. I believe it was in regards to a pregnant woman, but he explained an alternative test that can be done other than the stupid, irresponsible glucose test.

  4. #4
    CarbDodger's Avatar
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    I wouldn't worry about the test, ultimately it just shows how you tolerate glucose which is a useful thing to know -if your test is outside of normal results you actually already know the answer - avoid high GI foods and carry on what you are doing.
    With a normal HbA1c and FGT you are currently out of the diagnostic criteria for diabetes and an abnormal GTT only shows there might be a possibility of diabetes in the future as your beta cells cant cope with a hard spike.
    its good to know as much about your own body as you can
    congrats on the 14kg .
    When I'd had enough of the grain and starched based 'diabetic eating for health' diet (eating for health, my ass!) my weight was 242.5 lbs. On starting primal- 18th April 2013 weight : 238.1.
    27th July 2013. weight after 100 days 136.9 weight lost 101.2lb ; that's 105.6lbs since I stopped the 'diabetic eating for health'
    new journal http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...ml#post1264082

  5. #5
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    Its just a test. Think of it this way: go in, show rockstar like glucose/insulin responses to the glucose challenge and when they ask you how you did it, tell them you eat paleo

  6. #6
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    If you are an American avoiding a medical label is a valid decision point.

    In general, if the test is just going to be ignored in favor of your A1C, I would not take the test. We love to do tests that have absolutely no decision consequence- docs have to offer them if they are standard of care and IMHO it is the responsibility of citizens to say No, as well as simply good for your health. On that last point see The Last Well Person by Norton Hadler.
    “In God we trust; all others must bring data.” W. Edwards Deming
    Blogging at http://loafingcactus.com

  7. #7
    otzi's Avatar
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    It's easy to do your own GTT, and you can do a better one at home than they do at the docs office.

    Buy a BG tester, like the Ultra OneTouch Mini blood sugar levels one touch ultra low blood sugar glucometer You can find them for under $20 all day long on the internet or local drug stores. Then buy 50-100 test strips--these get a little more expensive (that's how they get your money!).

    Check your FBG upon waking and then every 30 minutes to 1 hour until you eat and see what it does. Chart your results to review and compare later.

    For a really good GTT, take your FBG, then eat 1/2 pound of plain potato--no butter or sour cream--just potato. This will deliver a known quantity of glucose to your bloodstream very quickly. Weigh the potato, next time you do the test--eat the exact same quantity.

    After you eat the potato, check your BG every 15 minutes and plot out a glucose curve. Do this for 3 hours or until you get several consecutive nearly-identical readings. This is your baseline curve.

    Repeat the experiment anytime you want to check. Keep good records for future study.

    The reason this is better than the one the doc will perform, they just check you BG every 60 minutes--a lot goes on in 60 minutes that they will miss--they are just looking for wild, out-of-control spikes.

    A typical, insulin-sensitive, non-diabetic person will see a plot of numbers like this in response to the potato GTT:

    FBG - 80-110
    Eat
    15 min - 110
    30 min - 110
    45 min - 130
    60 min - 140-160
    75 min - 130
    90 min - 110
    105 min - 100
    120 min - 90
    135 min - 85
    150 min - 85
    165 min - 86
    3hours - 87

    If you had pre- or T2D, you'd see something like:

    FBG - 120-140
    Eat
    15 min - 145
    30 min - 200
    60 min - 200-300+
    120 min - 200
    3 hours - 165
    4 hours - 130

    ANYBODY with BG issues or questions would be well-served to invest $100 in a BG tester and do some self-experimenting. It may give you peace of mind, uncover a real problem, and can also help you eat in a way that minimizes blood sugar spikes. It's very interesting to see the post-prandial response to different food combo's and after adding low GI foods to high GI foods, etc...
    Last edited by otzi; 06-19-2013 at 01:27 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by loafingcactus View Post
    If you are an American avoiding a medical label is a valid decision point.

    In general, if the test is just going to be ignored in favor of your A1C, I would not take the test. We love to do tests that have absolutely no decision consequence- docs have to offer them if they are standard of care and IMHO it is the responsibility of citizens to say No, as well as simply good for your health. On that last point see The Last Well Person by Norton Hadler.
    I agree.

  9. #9
    sonialanc's Avatar
    sonialanc is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks to everyone for your words of wisdom. I have a glucose meter so will certainly try the home GTT, does it matter how the potato is cooked and whether its old or new? I spoke to my naturopath who said I just needed to call the drs and say "no thanks" as there is no clinical indication to put myself through the trauma. I've since done that.

    I do have valid reasons why I want to avoid an unnecessary label which I won't go into here. I certainly agree that it's much more useful to see how my body reacts to glucose loading when having different types of carbs so I know how to eat properly for my body

    Cheers
    S

  10. #10
    otzi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sonialanc View Post
    ...does it matter how the potato is cooked and whether its old or new?
    S
    Doesn't really matter, but for the sake of continuity, you should prepare it the same way each time you do the test. To make it easy, just eyeball the potato for size, say, fist sized. Then peel it and boil it. Eat it as soon as it's cool enough to eat--salt/pepper OK, no vinegar or fat of any kind and do it on an empty stomach.

    If you weigh the potato, it will probably weigh between 250-350 grams and will contain between 50-65g of starch which will convert quickly to glucose. An Oral GTT at the docs would entail drinking 75g of glucose syrup--so the potato GTT is a bit easier on you. To get 75g exactly, you'd need a potato (or several) that weighs exactly 488g.

    In this case, the exact amount isn't critical, but using close to the same amount in future tests would be helpful to you.

    Post your results here if you try!

    Have fun!

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