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Thread: Primal cookbooks? page 2

  1. #11
    Mick's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel
    [quote]

    the author seems to think that olive oil, salt, soy sauce, peas, sweet potato, mayonnaise, paprika, tomato, cayenne pepper, honey, flaxseed, protein powder, chilli, tomato pasta sauce, capsicum, maple syrup, arrowroot, butter, chocolate, millet flour and goats cheese are all paleo ingredients.</blockquote>


    During the Paleolithic Age most of northern Europe and north America were still under the ice sheet. If Stone Age people are in question, it&#39;s the people of the Mesolithic Age that are of interest. This is after the Pleistocene gave way to the Holocene:


    http://www.bradshawfoundation.com/journey/


    Some of the plants in that list are New World plants, so won&#39;t have been available to most people during that era. (But so what?)


    Protein powder, like any non-natural foodstuff is probably best in the bin (and would be even if people in the past had been using it).


    Honey was (and is) of very great significance to Stone Age people. To the Bushmen (actual living Stone Age people) it has a sacred significance, and they would even risk death to get it:


    http://books.google.com/books?q=bushmen+honey&btnG=Search+Books


    It was used in the Stone Age. Indeed, it has been used by people as long as there have been people around - and before, too, since non-human primates search it out.


    Maple syrup was made by North American Indians - another actual Stone Age people:


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maple_syrup#Native_Americans


    Millet would certainly have been exploited by hunter-gatherers living in the areas in which it grew - which is how it came to be domesticated.


    Butter I suppose they did lack. That was their loss, and they&#39;ve certainly have eaten it if they&#39;d had it, knowing a good and nutritious food when they came across it.


  2. #12
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    Some old French cookbooks published before the low-fat ideology really took off might be good.


    I&#39;ve got one called the The Norman Table by Claude Guermont. I&#39;ve never used it much, but there&#39;s some interesting stuff in there. The sweet baked goods are obviously out, but some of the meat recipes look good:


    "Baked Pork chops with Sauteed Apples and Cream" - an easy one

    "Moules a la Mariniere" - a classic

    "Terrine de Lievere" - hare terrine, if you can get the hare


    Then there&#39;s rillettes - potted pork.


  3. #13
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    maba is offline Senior Member
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    I just found this food blog, the recipes look pretty primal:


    http://www.starchfreerecipes.com/


  4. #14
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    Thanks Maba! I have 7 recipes copied already! I love my Primal &#39;brothers&#39; and &#39;sisters&#39;! ;-)


  5. #15
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    Found a good cookbook at my library, and I checked Amazon, they have a few copies there, too:


    Back to Protein, the Low Carb, No Carb Meat Cookbook by Barbara Doyen. It&#39;s definitely a keeper, I&#39;m going to buy myself a copy. It&#39;s got 450 recipes, each one designated as one of the following: No Carbs, Trace (less then 1g per serving), Very Low Carbs (5g or less), and Low Carbs (10g or less).


    Lots of helpful sidebars, too, and recipe variations. There&#39;s even a section devoted to wild game meats for those true Grok hunters out there!


    Good stuff.


  6. #16
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    If you look for low-carb community on Amazon, they have a lot of low-carb books. I posted the link here on one of the threads y&#39;day. I was suprised to find a Food TV chef called Stella (forget his first name) who has had low-carb cooking shows and has written low-carb cook books.


    ETA: Found the link:

    http://www.amazon.com/tag/low%20carb..._cdp_ptcl_istp


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