Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: beef broth do you add water while its cooking page

  1. #1
    sting's Avatar
    sting is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    176

    beef broth do you add water while its cooking

    Shop Now
    I bought some beef bones for a broth and read it needs to be cooked for 24 to 48 hours. Not sure how many litters of water fits in the big pot that i am using, but its a lot and after 3 hours of cooking half of the water has disappeared, so i turned the heat down very low lowest and was wondering do you add extra water while its cooking vaporizing?

  2. #2
    picklepete's Avatar
    picklepete is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,350
    For the richest stock the water level should barely cover the bones. You can always dilute it later when making soup.

    The heat should be low enough that the water doesn't deplete. I usually see a very faint bubbling when I check on it. My stockpot lid has a tiny ventilation hole so during the 48-hour batches I might add 4-8 oz of water if it falls below the bones but usually not.
    34//6'3"/180

    Lots of: urban hiking, cycling, sprinting
    Lots of: fresh meat, seafood, eggs, organs, tubers, starch fruits, vegetables, meat fat, dairy fat, oil fruits
    Some: cured meat, dairy protein, sweet fruits, rice, pulses, tree nuts, oil seeds
    Minimal: soy, refined proteins, sugar, liquid carbohydrate, grains, refined oils, peanuts

  3. #3
    sting's Avatar
    sting is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    176
    Quote Originally Posted by picklepete View Post
    For the richest stock the water level should barely cover the bones. You can always dilute it later when making soup..
    I filled up the whole pot its way over the bones oops

    I thought having water just over the bones would see it deplete after so many hours.

    So the water doesn't vaporize after long cooking in very low? And is 48 hours right?

  4. #4
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    4,868
    If the pot is tightly covered, very little should evaporate.

  5. #5
    picklepete's Avatar
    picklepete is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,350
    Quote Originally Posted by sting View Post
    I filled up the whole pot its way over the bones oops

    I thought having water just over the bones would see it deplete after so many hours.

    So the water doesn't vaporize after long cooking in very low? And is 48 hours right?
    No worries! It's not ruined, it'll just be less thick and more mild in flavor.
    I do red meat bones for 48. I do bird or fish bones for 24 (unless it's big stuff like a turkey spine).
    34//6'3"/180

    Lots of: urban hiking, cycling, sprinting
    Lots of: fresh meat, seafood, eggs, organs, tubers, starch fruits, vegetables, meat fat, dairy fat, oil fruits
    Some: cured meat, dairy protein, sweet fruits, rice, pulses, tree nuts, oil seeds
    Minimal: soy, refined proteins, sugar, liquid carbohydrate, grains, refined oils, peanuts

  6. #6
    sting's Avatar
    sting is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    176
    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    If the pot is tightly covered, very little should evaporate.
    geez i have the lid slightly open so air gets in and out thinking it needs some air hehe that's how much of a cook i am


    Quote Originally Posted by picklepete View Post
    No worries! It's not ruined, it'll just be less thick and more mild in flavor.
    I do red meat bones for 48. I do bird or fish bones for 24 (unless it's big stuff like a turkey spine).
    maybe i should turn up the heat so it depletes a little than turn it down so its thicker?

  7. #7
    Sandra in BC's Avatar
    Sandra in BC is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,100
    It's fine if you top it up. But once you bring to a boil. Turn it down to barely a simmer.
    I use a slow cooker on high till it starts to bubble then in low for 48 hours. I fit in as many bones as I can then top it up with water.
    Sandra
    *My obligatory intro

    There are no cheat days. There are days when you eat primal and days you don't. As soon as you label a day a cheat day, you're on a diet. Don't be on a diet. ~~ Fernaldo

    DAINTY CAN KISS MY PRIMAL BACKSIDE. ~~ Crabcakes

  8. #8
    sting's Avatar
    sting is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    176
    OK thanks

    Hmm silly question but with the lid tightly shut its now whistling away now > noisy, hence why i thought i leave a gap at the top thinking it needs air but i shouldn't? I never cook sorry

  9. #9
    Bifcus's Avatar
    Bifcus is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Canberra, Australia.
    Posts
    145
    If it is whistling, it is boiling. You want to try to reduce the temperature. Check you are using the smallest burner on your stove turned to it's lowest temperature. If that still isn't low enough, you want to get hold of a simmer mat - supermarkets may have them, or try Kmart cooking area, or sometimes even the discount shops will have them.

    I don't like leaving the stove on overnight, so I only ever cook stock down for a few hours - finish up early enough that I can cool it to put in the fridge that night. Maybe it doesn't get quite as much goodness out of the bones, but it seems to work OK for me.

  10. #10
    Kaylee99's Avatar
    Kaylee99 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    799
    I like to simmer the bones for a long time (days sometimes, especially if there isn't a lot of cartilage and more solid bone) so I will add water if the pot looks low. When its gone on long enough I strain out the bones and then simmer with the lid off to reduce the water amount-tasting often until it rich enough for me. I'll add veggies at this time for more flavor as well (unless I'm making plain beef broth).

    (When I simmer for days I will turn it off at night, let it cool, then store overnight in the fridge. No one in my family likes a really oily broth so I'll skim off the cold fat in the morning before starting that day's worth of simmering.)
    See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •