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Thread: Your Mecca to Middle Eastern Foods. page 3

  1. #21
    Jenry Hennings's Avatar
    Jenry Hennings is offline Senior Member
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    Primal Fuel
    Another popular kabob recipe is 'Jujeh Kabob'. Jujeh is traditionally made with Poussin, but I'm sure I don't have to tell you that Chicken is a valid substitute? I did?! Ugh... Anyway, the secret to this is all in the marinade, of which I have 3. Two of which I've had.

    Lemon Marinade (Traditional, and my favorite):
    -Juice of 2 lemons,
    -Finely Grated Onion
    -1/2 tsp saffron leaves (NB refer to previous post about how to prepare saffron)
    -Salt and Pepper to taste.
    -As much olive oil as it takes to comfortable cover the meat.

    Another note on saffron: as well as being used as per the recipe, Drizzling a teaspoon or so on the chicken/poussin after it's cooked is very flavourful. As it's not the strongest spice, it is recommended that it is used towards the end of recipes so that the subtlety doesn't drown out. It's definitly worth it.

    Yoghurt Marinade:
    -1 Cup Full fat greek yoghurt
    -Finely grated Onion
    -Saffron (as above)
    -Salt and Pepper

    Soy sauce marinade (The one I haven't tried)
    -4Tbsp dark soy sauce
    -1tsp finely chopped ginger
    -1/2 tsp Honey
    -Groundnut Oil (Is it Primal? I don't think so, but despite never having had it before, I think it's quite a mild oil, so use your wits to find suitable replacements.)
    -2 Garlic cloves

    I'd be interested to know how that one turns out

    Notes on marinating:
    The meat best absorbs the flavours without skin, which is counterintuitive on PB, but I'm sure you can separately grill or pan fry the skin until nice and crispy.
    For best results, Leave for days!

    (btw, I'm in the process of gathering ingredients for a lamb dish as requested, so stay tuned.)

    Happy BBQ-in'!

  2. #22
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    Thank you for this, I will definately be trying a recipe or two and shall let you know how it goes!

    Alex.

  3. #23
    Jenry Hennings's Avatar
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    Food post has been long overdue.. Went to London and got some authentic stuff that Tesco 'n' co just won't stock..

    This dish is called 'Halim Bademjan', a lamb and aubergine 'paste', typically eaten for breakfast, and pre-paleo days, this plus warm bread is definatly worth getting up for. It can also be served as a starter, which in Persian cuisine are left on the table through the whole meal as an accompaniment. I'd suggest googling 'Persian Cuisine' to learn more about feeding rituals. Ingredients are as follows:
    - 5-8 small aubergines/eggplants (equivalent to 600g/1lb 5oz)
    - Salt
    - 3 Onions
    - Oil
    - 500g Shoulder of Lamb (with bone)
    - 4-5 Tablespoons Kashk*
    - 3-4 Garlic chopped coarsley
    - 5-6 Tablespoons Dried Mint
    - 1/4 teaspoon Saffron
    - 10 Walnut halves finely chopped (optional)

    *Kashk is whey (the very same!...sorta), found only in Iranian/Specialist ME shops. Worth the buy if you're into this sort of cooking alot, however sour cream or even 'paneer', goats cheese, can be used in it's place.

    As with any good Persian dish, preparation and cooking takes a matter of hours. Use it as an 'excercise': Stay standing during the whole preparation, grok squatting where neccessary. (After having read 'Primalize everyday life' before this)

    So how do you make it oh wise one? Listen in my padawan..

    1. Peel Aubergines, and cut them lengthways into thick slices.
    2. Spread on paper towels, and salt them. Leave for at least 2 hours. (The longer they're left, the less oil they absorb when fried)
    3. Quarter onions. Heat oil in a large pan, and fry until golden brown.
    4. Add lamb, brown it on all sides. Pour 1.5L/55oz water, cover, and simmer gently for 2 hours.
    5. If using Kashk, decant it from the jar, add a cup of water, and heat on low to medium for 20 minutes. Stir frequently. Beware, it can burn. Once done, set aside and cover.
    6. Dry aubergines, pour oil to cover 1cm/half an inch in a non stick pan, and fry in batches until golden brown (texture like sun..) on both sides.
    7. Finely chop the remaining onions, and fry in a small pan until golden brown, then set aside.
    8. Lift meat from the pot, and allow to cool, and remove the meat. Puree the meat
    9. Combine half the fried onions with all the aubergine, and food process it. Blend well
    10. Stir Lamb puree and aubergine mix in a pot, adding 2-3 tablespoons of the kashk/sour cream/paneer. Season with salt to taste, and keep warm
    11. Fry garlic till it smells awsome, rub dried mint to a powder using your fingers into the oil, stir twice then remove IMMEDIATLY! Otherwise it'll taste bitter.
    12. Dissolve ground saffron in a few tablespoons of hot water
    13. Spread meat mixture on a platter, pour remaining kashk/cream over the top, sprinkle remaining onions, and chopped walnuts. Decorativly drizzle the garlic oil and saffron over what I hope is now edible

    Notes from author: I'm not an expert at cookery, so initially, I found this overwhelming. I would even go so far as saying that some steps are, while crucial for overall presentation and detail, not neccessary. For example, the last 3 steps. It's a nice addition, definitely worth trying once, but to me, it's a 'meh' sort of thing. Don't omit the garlic though, just fry it with the onions.
    Also, having done this once so far, there are a lot of things that can be done in advance. Eg. Aubergines, various chopping, and saffron.
    I'd think that if using de-boned lambed from the start, as I, you can food process everything together once the aubergines are done.. I didn't, but it'd be worth thinking about if you're processor is accomadation enough.

    Let me know how you go!

  4. #24
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    Love it. I was on a buisness trip in Denver and ended up going to a late lunch with my Iranian cab driver. He took me to his favorite ME restaurant and insisted on ordering food for me. I'm glad he did because the Iranian name 'Mast o Khiar' would have meant nothing to me. Now I always have some on hand and insist that all meat be dipped in the stuff!
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  5. #25
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    My fridge is never without full fat greek yoghurt, for that very reason My favorite is mast o musir, which since I'm here, might as well type up:
    - Greek Yoghurt
    - Musir

    Musir is another specialist ingredient, which may find it's way to the west by the name of wild garlic. Although, it's essentially dried shallots thinly sliced. It's pretty strong stuff and you'll only need a couple at a time.

    1- Soak the musir overnight in a bowl with just enough water to cover the musir.
    2- Chop the suckers up as fine as possible, then mix into yoghurt.
    3- Leave in the fridge for a couple hours minimum for the flavours to mingle.
    4- Eat with ANYTHING!

  6. #26
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    This next one comes from the Holy Land, in the form of street vendor food: The Sweet Potato Falafel.. Gather you're shit:
    -2 Medium Sweet Potatoes/Yams/The orange ones.. (about 700g total)
    -Cumin
    -2 to 3 chopped garlic
    -Ground Coriander
    -Lemon Juice
    -Coconut Flour (120g)
    -Olive oil
    -Salt and Pepper

    1. Roast the potatoes whole until nice and tender, the remove them and leave to cool
    2. Peel them, and combine with cumin, coriander, lemon juice and coconut flour and mash to a smooth mix
    3. Stick them in the fridge for about an hour to firm up, or the freezer for half that, if you're particularly impatient.
    4. Remove, and then shape your mix into little balls.
    5. Place on an oiled tray, and whack them in the oven until their bases are golden brown. (Van Morrison rears his head again!)

    Sprinkle with sesame seeds before baking if feeling particularly whimsical.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
    This next one comes from the Holy Land, in the form of street vendor food: The Sweet Potato Falafel..
    Ok, stopping on the way home from work to pick up what I need for this. I see it being a huge hit at my house.
    50yo, 5'3"
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    GW- Goals are no longer weight-related

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
    This next one comes from the Holy Land, in the form of street vendor food: The Sweet Potato Falafel..
    Made this tonight. I roasted the sweet potatoes a couple of nights ago and put them in the frig until tonight.

    700g sweet potatoes is about 1.5 lbs. I used the juice from 1/2 large lemon and probably could have used more, because 6T coconut flour was more than enough. 120g=8T and I could see that the potatoes were going to be way too stiff with that much. My coconut flour has been in the freezer a while, so maybe it's dried out a bit. I formed the mix into discs about 2" across by 1/2" thick because our local Mediterranean restaurant shapes their falalel that way and it made 16 of them. They didn't need any time in the frig to stiffen up. I was feeling whimsical, so I pressed sesame seeds into the tops. At 400F they took about 25 min to brown on the bottom and then I flipped them for another 25 min on the top.

    Huge hit! As I expected. We basically ate them for dessert.
    50yo, 5'3"
    SW-195
    CW-125, part calorie counting, part transition to primal
    GW- Goals are no longer weight-related

  9. #29
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    CHICKEN SHAWARMA!!! I AM COMPLETELY AND UTTERLY OBSESSED. THREW BACK TWO BASKET FULLS earlier today! I want more, RIGHT NOW!

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
    This next one comes from the Holy Land, in the form of street vendor food: The Sweet Potato Falafel.. Gather you're shit:
    These sound outrageously wonderful. Just fired up my toaster oven. Was needing some starchies and happen to have everything. I love street food.


    Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

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