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Thread: resistance training for mature (i.e vantage-aged) women? page 2

  1. #11
    RichMahogany's Avatar
    RichMahogany is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    Hire someone to teach you. That's what I did. Only needed 3 sessions. Actually only really needed 2 sessions, but I paid for 3.
    Listen. To. This. Lady.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aili View Post
    Thanks. I don't understand all that you speak of (cycles, etc.), since I use those machines instead of free weights.
    A "five day cycle" means I lift one day and take 4 days off from that lift. I have optimized my lifting by recovery time.

    The one thing I do find is that my shoulders seem to be weakest (always were) and lifting 20 pounds 10 times seems an effort.
    Women tend to have low upper body strength. It takes a lot of time to overcome that.

    I did not max out yesterday at the gym , but did feel that I had exerted myself in my muscles, sort of weaker. Today I feel fine, no aches and pains.
    I have found that I am never sore the day after I bench press, but still I make maximum improvement by taking 4 days of rest.

    1. What do you mean by "I require very little volume to make improvements"?
    Compared to the guys, I do very little exercise. I don't need to do 5 sets each of 5 different variations on an exercise to improve my strength. And I take breaks between sets.

    If you want to get maximally strong, you should find someone to help you learn how to use barbells.

    I am 58.

  3. #13
    Aili's Avatar
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    Wow, I have heard that barbells are superior to machines in many ways. So thanks for the reminder. My arms of funny, strong biceps and paddling arm, but sucking at lifting overhead.
    I totally get that using barbells engages the whole body whereas machines tend to work on muscle groups, and so, I will plan to get a lesson (or more). I do get already some stuff.
    It sounds as if you do weight training each day. Do you keep it low volume each day? Where is the equipment you use each day.?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aili View Post
    Wow, I have heard that barbells are superior to machines in many ways. So thanks for the reminder. My arms of funny, strong biceps and paddling arm, but sucking at lifting overhead.
    I totally get that using barbells engages the whole body whereas machines tend to work on muscle groups, and so, I will plan to get a lesson (or more). I do get already some stuff.
    It sounds as if you do weight training each day. Do you keep it low volume each day? Where is the equipment you use each day.?
    I never much liked doing overhead work. Handstand work agrees with me.

    I have a bench and rack in my living room, and a pullup bar mounted on the wall in my dining room. Odds and ends get put in a corner when they're not being used.

    I do something most days. I also take long walks.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    I never much liked doing overhead work. Handstand work agrees with me.

    I have a bench and rack in my living room, and a pullup bar mounted on the wall in my dining room. Odds and ends get put in a corner when they're not being used.

    I do something most days. I also take long walks.
    It's pretty much impossible to isolate one specific muscle, not quite sure how that myth arose with regards to machines. For sure a barbell will engage more stabilizer muscles but they can also cause more focus on balance etc. than on exerting 100% effort on the exercise. Take a shoulder press machine, your core will still be engaged but being firmly seated in a machine allows 100% focus on smoothly and slowly lifting the weight until full failure is achieved. Both barbells and machines have their place and neither should be placed above the other.

  6. #16
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    I don't lift every day, either. I've switched to doing squats once a week, press once a week, bench once a week, power cleans once a week and deadlift once a week. So far the progress I'm making seems easier than before when I tried to squat 2 or 3 times a week.

    Also, when I hired the trainer I agonized over it for months. At once point I called a lady who advertised online and she was the meanest sounding lady I ever spoke with. I quickly thanked her for her time and hung up. I didn't call anybody else for at least a month I was so traumatized by the conversation. Once I made my appointment (with a trainer at the university) I rehearsed a million times in my head what I would say to her. I wanted to be sure I didn't chicken out of asking for what I really wanted. Fortunately our first conversations were by email so I could tell her that I only wanted to learn how to use the barbells and do old-school weight training with barbells. She didn't teach me everything exactly the way Rippetoe says the lifts should be done, but that didn't matter because what I learned was really helpful and sometimes I think Rippetoe is wrong anyway (the blasphemy!). Having the confidence to walk up to the equipment and use it was worth every penny. Not knowing how to put the plates on and adjust the racks was probably more scary than doing the lifts wrong! I didn't want to look like an idiot. I spent a lot of my time asking about etiquette, too, since I hadn't been inside a gym since the 1980s.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 180 x 2. Current Deadlift: 230 x 2

  7. #17
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    i'm 48 as well. i live way out the boonies so i go to the gym once a week when i go to town. i hire a trainer when i do that simply coz i find it far more motivational, i achieve far more and we bounce ideas off each other and get to do some real cool stuff. it is my one indulgence. i do full body and a mix of free weights and machines when i go to the gym. i do body weight stuff at home every second day and i walk an average of 6ks a day over uneven terrain. what i work on is doing the full ROM on everything. screw the actual weight, altho they are getting up there. i also try very hard to be consistent. mix it up so it is always interesting. try different things. set goals. eg doing a chin up which i can do now. the other thing i found is if you get the work ethic to keep at it, if you injure yourself, you can change track and keep going. so when i did something evil to my ankle a few months ago, i switched to laying hamstring curls instead of dumbbell lunges coz i could and focused of upper body work which was when i managed my first chin up.

  8. #18
    Aili's Avatar
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    Thanks all for this interesting stuff. much appreciated...

  9. #19
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    Thanks all for this interesting stuff. much appreciated...inspirational too

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