Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 55

Thread: Rice v. Potato v. Quinoa v. Whole Wheat Pasta

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    27

    Question Rice v. Potato v. Quinoa v. Whole Wheat Pasta

    I was looking at the nutrition analyses for the food items mentioned above, and now I'm not sure what good reason I would have for avoiding wheat. I do believe I have a mild sensitivity to gluten (I tend to get stomach cramps after eating a meal with a high wheat content), but I can generally tolerate most wheat just fine in moderation. So what reason is there, if any, for those who can tolerate gluten to avoid wheat? From what I see here, whole wheat pasta has the lowest glycemic index, as well as a decent amount of protein and a fair amount of manganese, selenium, magnesium, and phosphorus. The only competition as far as bang for your calorie seems to be quinoa, which is slightly higher in calories and glycemic load, but the elevated fat content may help keep one's appetite content for longer.

    Quinoa:
    Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Quinoa, cooked

    White rice:
    Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Rice, white, long-grain, regular, cooked

    Potato:
    Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Potatoes, boiled, cooked without skin, flesh, without salt

    Whole Wheat Pasta:
    Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Spaghetti, whole-wheat, cooked

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Calgary, AB
    Posts
    5,780
    Have you read the list of ingredients on your package of pasta? Is it just ground wheat, water and salt? The problem with processed pastas is that it get a lot of chemicals added to it in the process, removing it from actual grain form when it has those nutrients it advertises. In additions, the proteins/glutens in modern wheat has little to do with the atcual plant (kamut, spelt are closer to the real thing). Due to the alterations and processing it alters your response to food, including a significant increase in appetite. If you do chose to eat wheat, I would suggest you look at cracked wheat, burgulr (or buckwheat (my best pick for grains due to Magnesium), millet, barley etc,) i.e hot cereal, rather than any form of products that start with flour.

    On the whole though, I would not trust nutritional charts explicitly. I don't think they re-analyse foods reguraly, just copy the old stuff over. Sort of like folks in 17th century still had trouble believing that elephants have knees because Starbo said they did not.

    But form the things you listed, unless you have joint pains, I would chose potato as the most satiating option, and even if they are not in the running, properly prepared or canned beans/lentils.
    Last edited by Leida; 06-12-2013 at 05:38 AM.
    My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
    When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    5,426
    If you get stomach cramps after eating wheat, you cannot tolerate it. You are kidding yourself. You are either gluten intolerant or celiac.

    Glycemic index is a useless measure for purpose of weight control.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Narberth, PA
    Posts
    5,623
    I wish people didn't know about gluten . I really do, because people are so hyperfocused on it they ignore the other issues.

    I am not a gluten-intolerant person by the standard definition (although I believe every person is gluten-intolerant, just to varying degrees). If I consume an entire pound of pasta right now, I'll be absolutely fine. If I were to do it after a heavy workout I'd probably feel pretty good, actually. But gluten content is one of many reasons to avoid wheat.

    1.) WGA - wheat germ agglutinin - could be an even bigger problem than gluten. I'll leave it up to you to research this lectin, but WGA content is going to be much more prevalent in whole wheat pasta because the germ is removed in white flour.

    2.) Phytic acid content - whole wheat pasta has more whan white flour. Mark Sisson posted a study years ago that showed people that ate whole wheat pasta actually absorbed less nutrients than people that ate white flour pasta. It was interesting to say the least, though I don't have a link.

    3.) Nutrient density and bioavailability. Whole wheat pasta may look decent compared to other pastas, but compare it to potatoes, eggs, shrimp or broccoli. Grains in general are low-nutrient poverty foods. Then factor in the minerals that are there are generally bound to insoluble fibers that can't be digested by humans, paired with the phytic acid content that further blocks absorption...well, the real nutrients in potato or white rice flour you can actually use while the nutrients in wheat are a small fraction of what is actually shown.

    4.) Insoluble fiber. Fiber is popular in CW, but just like there are different types of fats, there are different types of fibers. Soluble fiber, found in roots, tubers and legumes, feed gut bacteria and promote healthy digestion. Some soluble fibers and resistant starches ferment in the large intestine and produce short-chain fatty acids like butyrate, which are beneficial. Insoluble grain fibers, however, are known to scar the colon and lead to colon cancer.

    I don't blindly do paleo. Just because something is neolithic doesn't make it bad and just because something is traditional or ancient doesn't make it good. I view food on a "nutrient density per calorie versus toxin load" basis. Because of this, I'm not opposed to white rice or nixtamalized non-GMO corn. I'm not a huge rice eater, but I eat a 12 pack of Whole Food's organic corn tortillas a week because they're delicious, somewhat nutritious and nearly toxin free thanks to the nixtamalization. Potatoes are in a whole different league. They are extremely nutritious, satiating and as long as you remove the skins, very low toxin. Most leafy greens contain higher toxin loads than potatoes.

    Because of this, I see no reason to logically eat wheat, and my avoidance of it for so long has taken away any taste I once had for it. The caloric content is high, the toxin load is high and the nutrient value is low. That makes it a poor quality food at best and a downright toxic food at worst. And remember, for 98% of us, wheat isn't going to be immediately toxic. It will happen over years or decades. Autoimmune conditions take a very long time to develop. Removing wheat from my diet has eliminated nearly all my outdoor allergies and really helped my tolerance to cat and dog dander. YMMV.
    Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 06-12-2013 at 06:15 AM.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    MA, USA
    Posts
    8,706
    ^Excellent response.

    And seriously, if you are sensitive to something, you are not doing yourself any kindness by eating it. This isn't just about nutritional density.
    Journal
    Current interests - Starting Strength (reading it very slowly)

    Depression Lies

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    317
    The benefits of quinoa (my emphasis):

    " In the case of Quinoa, it contains soap-like molecules called saponins. Unlike gluten, which attaches to a carrier molecule in the intestines, saponins simply punch holes in the membranes of the microvilli cells. Yes, that’s bad. Saponins are so irritating to the immune system that they are used in vaccine research to help the body mount a powerful immune response. The bottom line is if you think grains or grain-like items like Quinoa are healthy or benign, you are not considering the full picture."

    How to Keep Feces Out of Your Bloodstream (or Lose 10 Pounds in 14 Days)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Narberth, PA
    Posts
    5,623
    Quote Originally Posted by upupandaway View Post
    The benefits of quinoa (my emphasis):

    " In the case of Quinoa, it contains soap-like molecules called saponins. Unlike gluten, which attaches to a carrier molecule in the intestines, saponins simply punch holes in the membranes of the microvilli cells. Yes, that’s bad. Saponins are so irritating to the immune system that they are used in vaccine research to help the body mount a powerful immune response. The bottom line is if you think grains or grain-like items like Quinoa are healthy or benign, you are not considering the full picture."

    How to Keep Feces Out of Your Bloodstream (or Lose 10 Pounds in 14 Days)
    Nuts contain things like this as well.

    Again, just because something is neolithic doesn't make it bad and just because something is ancient doesn't make it good. I consider organic masa harina to be healthier than almonds, and I consider molasses, maple syrup and honey to be healthier than fats like lard, tallow, olive oil, avocado oil, etc.

    I wouldn't eat quinoa. IMO if you're going to go for something grain-like, the best options are traditional corn tortillas and nixtamalized grits (known as hominy).
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    3,799
    Quote Originally Posted by upupandaway View Post
    The benefits of quinoa (my emphasis):

    " In the case of Quinoa, it contains soap-like molecules called saponins. Unlike gluten, which attaches to a carrier molecule in the intestines, saponins simply punch holes in the membranes of the microvilli cells. Yes, thatís bad. Saponins are so irritating to the immune system that they are used in vaccine research to help the body mount a powerful immune response. The bottom line is if you think grains or grain-like items like Quinoa are healthy or benign, you are not considering the full picture."

    How to Keep Feces Out of Your Bloodstream (or Lose 10 Pounds in 14 Days)
    If you bought your quinoa from your grocer, then you do not have to worry about saponin contaminating your food. Most of the quinoa products that are sold in North America have been sufficiently processed to eliminate the unpalatable saponin coating. If you havenít experienced any bitter aftertaste, then you are eating commercial-grade quinoa. It is safe from saponin even if you failed to soak or rinse it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    27
    Thanks for all the input; there's a lot of good info here which is exactly what I was hoping for.

    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    If you get stomach cramps after eating wheat, you cannot tolerate it. You are kidding yourself. You are either gluten intolerant or celiac.

    Glycemic index is a useless measure for purpose of weight control.
    I do consider myself gluten intolerant, I was just wondering in general. My concern about diet and nutrition isn't just for myself but also for my family and friends. And I'm not concerned with weight control. I'm extremely active and not overly concerned with being super fit or anything. My main concern regarding glycemic index is what kind of insulin spike foods cause since this has a major impact on long-term health.

    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post

    1.) WGA - wheat germ agglutinin - could be an even bigger problem than gluten. I'll leave it up to you to research this lectin, but WGA content is going to be much more prevalent in whole wheat pasta because the germ is removed in white flour.

    2.) Phytic acid content - whole wheat pasta has more whan white flour. Mark Sisson posted a study years ago that showed people that ate whole wheat pasta actually absorbed less nutrients than people that ate white flour pasta. It was interesting to say the least, though I don't have a link.

    3.) Nutrient density and bioavailability... the real nutrients in potato or white rice flour you can actually use while the nutrients in wheat are a small fraction of what is actually shown.

    4.) Insoluble fiber. Fiber is popular in CW, but just like there are different types of fats, there are different types of fibers. Soluble fiber, found in roots, tubers and legumes, feed gut bacteria and promote healthy digestion. Some soluble fibers and resistant starches ferment in the large intestine and produce short-chain fatty acids like butyrate, which are beneficial. Insoluble grain fibers, however, are known to scar the colon and lead to colon cancer.

    ...

    Removing wheat from my diet has eliminated nearly all my outdoor allergies and really helped my tolerance to cat and dog dander. YMMV.
    Lots of good info here, thanks! Skin and allergies has been my main reason for removing wheat from my diet as well. I break out in hives every spring. This year, my hives were significantly milder and more short lived than they usually are, I suspect due to my decreased intake of wheat. I do still eat wheat on occasion, though. I do plan to eliminate it entirely by next spring to observe its impact on my skin.

    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    I consider organic masa harina to be healthier than almonds, and I consider molasses, maple syrup and honey to be healthier than fats like lard, tallow, olive oil, avocado oil, etc.

    I wouldn't eat quinoa. IMO if you're going to go for something grain-like, the best options are traditional corn tortillas and nixtamalized grits (known as hominy).
    Why do you consider molasses, maple syrup, and honey to be healthier than the fats you mentioned?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Narberth, PA
    Posts
    5,623
    Quote Originally Posted by Grokkette View Post
    Lots of good info here, thanks! Skin and allergies has been my main reason for removing wheat from my diet as well. I break out in hives every spring. This year, my hives were significantly milder and more short lived than they usually are, I suspect due to my decreased intake of wheat. I do still eat wheat on occasion, though. I do plan to eliminate it entirely by next spring to observe its impact on my skin.
    It took about 2 years of adherence to really notice the effects. I still had some allergy issues last year. This year I was free and clear. I think I've sneezed 3 times in the past 3 months. If you're not immediately better, don't give up. It takes years (or sometimes decades) to develop autoimmune conditions. It may take years to clear them up.

    Quote Originally Posted by Grokkette View Post
    Why do you consider molasses, maple syrup, and honey to be healthier than the fats you mentioned?
    Because they are generally more nutritious than refined fats. The only refined fats with any nutrition worth mentioning is pastured butter and red palm oil. Everything else is pretty much empty calories. Molasses is more nutrient dense than some actual foods, and maple syrup and honey both have well over 50 bioactive compounds and antioxidants. There is also nothing more fattening than isolated fat, too. I do not fear incidental fat built into food, but adding refined oils is the very definition of empty calories.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •