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Thread: Advice on coping with trigger foods in the house... page 3

  1. #21
    andi's Avatar
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    I'm sorry, I don't mean to give anyone bad advice. I've battled an eating disorder for many years, and maybe that is why this was something I had found to work at the time.

    It seemed logical that since a lot of learning takes place when actions are either rewarded or punished, then this would be a way to learn to restrain yourself from cheating.

  2. #22
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    OP, Cereal isn't good for you. Cereal isn't good for children. Teach them to eat good food for breakfast. If they won't eat something different for breakfast, say, "Fine," let them skip it and put more food in their lunches. They'll figure it out.

    This may seem harsh, but if someone came on the forum and said that their kids wanted to light up a joint before school and the bummer was that late at night the parent just binged smoking joint after joint, what would you advise?
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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  3. #23
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    Thanks to those of you who offered up suggestions. I've been going to bed a little earlier the past couple of nights and it seems to have helped. Also, I took a look at the days that I was able to just ignore the cereal in the house vs. the days that I binged and it seems like when I eat a big, high fat lunch I do best.

    At the moment I am still trying to figure this all out for myself. I absolutely believe that eating whole, nutritious foods is best for my family but until I can figure out what I'm doing I'm leaving things status quo. I'm not a SAHM so therefore don't have the luxury of getting up and cooking the kids bacon and eggs every day. Unfortunately they are on their own for breakfast and right now cereal is easy and what they like. Other right now alternatives would be toaster waffles, microwave pancakes...none of which has any nutritional value. I will look for the rice cereal and transition them over to that in the meantime until I've figured out what I can either pre-make for them or they can make on their own.

    JoanieL, I like the idea of only giving them good foods to choose from and letting them decide whether eating breakfast is worth it or not worth. Now I just need to know what those good foods would be. (also - I would NEVER come on here and complain that I was binge smoking a joint )

    Again, thanks to all of your who offered suggestions. I really appreciate the help while I'm getting started.

  4. #24
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    This is just off the top of my head.

    Salad stuff - pre-cut so they can create their own salads. Olive oil and vinegar to dress it.
    Hard boiled eggs or egg salad.
    Yogurt plain - keep some fruit around so they can mix in their own.
    Cheeses.
    Leftovers of any kind (well, primal) - they might even think this is cool.

    I think one of the things we all get trapped by is the idea that different meals have different rules. So we think breakfast means cereal, or bacon and eggs, or pancakes, or a danish. Then if we take away the wheat, we're left with just eggs and a side of meat. But that's more of a social or cultural thing than a health thing. There's nothing in the world that says we can't have a baked potato covered in butter and coconut aminos for breakfast. Or a steak and a salad. Or a can of sardines, though that one might be a hard-sell for kids. One of my favorite breakfasts (when I indulged) as a teenager was cold pizza from the night before.

    Primal is a bit more time-consuming when you first start out because you're replacing convenience foods with whole ones. But you'll get there and one day you'll wonder why you thought it was all so confusing and hard. I promise.

    Good luck!
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post
    Salad stuff - pre-cut so they can create their own salads. Olive oil and vinegar to dress it.
    Hard boiled eggs or egg salad.
    Yogurt plain - keep some fruit around so they can mix in their own.
    Cheeses.
    Leftovers of any kind (well, primal) - they might even think this is cool.
    These are good! The main problem with cereal is low protein.

    I used to scoop egg salad or seafood salad on cucumber slices (stripe peel and diagonal cut makes them more appealing). You could also prepare a parfait with plain Greek yogurt and cut fruit--kids like color. If they need starch, boiled/mashed plantain keeps pretty well in the fridge.

    There are lots of traditional egg breakfasts around the world designed to be quick. Certain vegetables and seasonings make them distinctive, and they could be baked in molds ahead of time and heated up.
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  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbingham View Post
    I'm not a SAHM so therefore don't have the luxury of getting up and cooking the kids bacon and eggs every day.
    I am a SAHM but to three special needs kids so my life is far too busy to be standing at the stove every morning. Every 3-4 days I set aside some time in the evening and cook up the following:

    Bacon (2 lbs)
    Sausage meat (2 lbs)
    Eggs (2 dozen, scrambled)
    Yams (3 large, chopped into chunks, tossed in a bit of bacon fat and sea salt and baked)
    Cabbage (1 large, chopped and sauteed in either bacon fat or coconut oil)
    Mushrooms (1-2 lbs, sliced and sauteed in bacon fat)

    All of those are stored in separate containers in the fridge along with a big container of salad, some smaller containers of cut up cucumber, peppers, tomatoes and cheese. There are also always ripe avocados, full fat organic flavoured and plain yogurts, lots of fruit, pepperoni or beef jerky, cans of tuna, homemade mayo and, in a pinch (for the kids only), GF Rice Krispies and Rice Chex).

    All kinds of breakfasts and lunches can be prepared from this food with minimal effort on the part of the eater. Most kids would be just as happy grabbing a piece of fruit and a handful of bacon as having a bowl of cereal. It's actually faster for them and far healthier.

  7. #27
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    Here's a crazy idea: Allow yourself to give into the cereal craving and eat it. Actually, overeat it. While you're doing this, really think about how your body is reacting to it. Do you enjoy the taste? The texture? Is it as good as you remember it being?

    **But** before you allow yourself to overeat it, make sure your fridge/freezer (meats, veggies, fruits, cheese) and pantry (nuts) are well stocked with clean/primal/paleo choices.

    And the day after you overeat the cereal, go back to primal/paleo/clean.

    Maybe giving into the craving fully will be enough to get the urge out of your system.

    Just a thought.

  8. #28
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    You've had lots of good suggestions here, there is bound to be something that will work for you.

    I would echo rice bubbles - they're the least offensive to be feeding the children, and also the least objectionable if you do happen to indulge in them yourself. With banana, berries and cream you actually have a not bad breakfast or a decent snack/dessert.

    Seeing kids food as out of bounds for you (ie the portion size box idea) could also work. I do this with other items.

    I would also endorse leftovers as a positive breakfast option for all of you. They're my favourite, but also my daughter's so if she is first up she scores a good breakfast. I don't mind, I just go ahead and make eggs for myself.

    Think progress, not perfection. Each adjustment that helps you and/or your family to eat more primally is a step in the right direction. Good luck.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Annieh View Post
    Think progress, not perfection. Each adjustment that helps you and/or your family to eat more primally is a step in the right direction. Good luck.
    This is so true. It took me 6 months to get the hang of shopping and cooking for the change in diet. When I started I really didn't see how we could manage a dinner entirely from whole foods every night. But over time I figured it out. It took a year for my teenage DD to step away from the processed crap that she loved. Just like with the bowls of cereal, if you give yourself time to think things through, you'll come up with a solution.
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