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    DinoHunter's Avatar
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    Kettlebells, how much weight?

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    Im thinking of getting some kettlebells to use for some of my workouts but theres such a range of weights 2 kg up to 30+kg)
    How do you decide what weight to start with? (im looking to buy online as i cant find much locally)
    Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise', I wash my mouth out with chocolate.

    http://primaldog.blogspot.co.uk/

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    If you are just starting out you will be fine just getting the 16kg kettlebell. Do your research (particularly about Pavel Tsatsouline) and you'll find more exercises than you need. If you're average or slightly above average strength you may also want to get the 24kg or one a 20kg bell. These would be used for things such as heavy swings. You should hold off on anything heavier until you can strictly overhead press the 24kg for about 10 reps per arm.

    You can't go wrong with the Rite of Passage program from "Enter the Kettlebell". Its simple, effective, and can be tailored to suit your interests.

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    Thanks, just starting out but
    Probably a fair bit above average strenth, however im a woman so im guessing the 16kg recomendation would still hold? (i assume you were saying 16kg for a man)
    Will go look up PT now
    Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise', I wash my mouth out with chocolate.

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    A lot of people comment about how expensive they are and I guess it is true. However I've really purchased one ( 50 lb'er) and absolutely love it, I think a person could get in awesome shape with just this one piece of equipment.
    These are just a few exercises that come to mind:

    Goblet squats ( legs ), single leg calf raises ( calves),presses ( shoulders), Rows ( back), Towel curls ( biceps), Towel extensions ( triceps), weighted sit-ups ( abs ) , various swings ( core and conditioning ).

    Ideally you could do with a couple of different weight but I'd recommend going slightly heavy if just getting the one !

    Here is me with mine just after I got her !


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    Quote Originally Posted by DinoHunter View Post
    Thanks, just starting out but
    Probably a fair bit above average strenth, however im a woman so im guessing the 16kg recomendation would still hold? (i assume you were saying 16kg for a man)
    Will go look up PT now
    Ah, sorry about that. Actually, the 16kg is on the heavy end for women's bells. Since you're already looking up Pavel, check out strongfirst.com.

    I'd play with the 12kg bell for presses and snatches. You could still get a heavier bell for swings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DinoHunter View Post
    Im thinking of getting some kettlebells to use for some of my workouts but theres such a range of weights 2 kg up to 30+kg)
    How do you decide what weight to start with? (im looking to buy online as i cant find much locally)
    I would recommend starting with a 16kg/35lb. It's essentially the classic standard kettlebell weight, from what I understand. Originally, Russian kettlebells were measured in "poods," 1 pood being equal to 16kg/35lb. It's the traditional weight to start with. Of course, it does depend on your goals and starting point though, there may be a good reason to start with another weight. By and large though, I think a 35 is pretty good for all around, general purpose workouts, especially ballistic complexes.

    One of the best things about kettlebells is the ballistic exercises. Swings, clean and press/jerk, high pulls, and snatches are some of the overall best full body exercises of any kind that you can do. Snatches especially are great, both for functional strength and huge energy expenditure. The American Council on Exercise did some tests on this and found that doing kettlebell snatches burns over 20 calories per minute (combined aerobic and anaerobic expenditure).

    http://www.acefitness.org/getfit/stu...ells012010.pdf

    There are some good reasons to get a heavier kettlebell, though if you want to get into ballistics, snatches particularly (which really are great, I'd highly recommend them), starting with something more than 35 could be a bit difficult. Personally, I started with the 35 and haven't regretted it at all, and most people I've talked to have said the same. Even after moving up to a 45lb bell, which is great too, I still use the 35 a lot and think it was a great place to start.

    Edit - Sorry, completely missed your second post. I agree with JMB, generally 35lb is considered a bit heavy for women's bells. 25lbs is considered a more standard starting weight. You could also start with something in between if you wanted, a few companies make 30lb bells which seems like it might be a nice middle ground.
    Last edited by TheChokingGame; 06-10-2013 at 11:04 AM.

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    well 16kg dosent sound that heavy to me really, Im 5'10 and pretty strong even compared to most guys I know.
    I used to toss 70lb hay bales around while the guys were struggling to drag theirs (or taking a "break" LOL) My work now means I spend all day lifting dogs weighing anywhere from 8 to 50kg (& lifting a squirming weight is much more difficult than one that dosent move)
    so 16kg would probably be a good starting point for me,,, plus I can always get a smaller one if it is to much
    Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise', I wash my mouth out with chocolate.

    http://primaldog.blogspot.co.uk/

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    I began with a 12kg, then bought a 16kg - which is still my main bell - then a 20kg.

    They've certainly been worthwhile investments.
    Meat is Prized, Wheat is Despised.

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    is there any functional difference between the iron ones & the vinyl/cement ones?
    Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise', I wash my mouth out with chocolate.

    http://primaldog.blogspot.co.uk/

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    Courtesy of Conditioning Research (another Scot - Conditioning Research) you might check these laddies out -- Combat Ready Gym

    "Established in 2009, the Combat Ready Gym is a private bare bones athletic training and martial arts facility. We use cutting edge methods of training to help our members stay safe and to get them fit. Our core self defence programme is the Israeli system of Krav Maga. In terms of our strength and conditioning we use a variety of kettlebell, bodyweight and olympic lifting to give our trainees truly functional movements."

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