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  1. #11
    Special K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by diene View Post
    Yes, the one time I bought a purple sweet potato from the Asian grocery store in my neighborhood, it was as Mark described. It was super sweet and syrupy, and I guess you could describe it as velvety smooth (it doesn't have the stringy fibers that regular sweet potatoes do). I actually didn't like it because I felt that it was way too sweet. Unfortunately, I can't remember exactly what it was called. I think it was simply purple sweet potato or maybe purple yam. I don't think it had a special name. There was no place of origin attached to it either.

    Sorry, this isn't very helpful, but the type of purple sweet potato Mark described does exist. I'll take a picture of one the next time I go to the Asian grocery store. It might be a few days before I go there again so check back on this thread if you want to see the pic!
    Yeah definitely take a picture the next time you are there and see if you can find any identifying information. Based on my experiences, the terms "purple yam", "purple sweet potato", and even "Okinawan purple sweet potato" are not precise terms and are applied to a range of very different types of purple potatoes.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Special K View Post
    Which of the two varieties described in Mark's article are you able to find:

    "They are white skinned with a deep, brilliant purple interior that becomes velvety smooth and incredibly sweet when baked."

    OR

    "Thereís another variety that looks extremely similar but has a lightly violet interior streaked with white. Itís starchier and far drier than the Okinawans, and it doesnít taste nearly as good."

    Every purple sweet potato I've bought has been in the second group.
    The 1st group, sweet and creamy smooth. Have also had the 2nd which was a lot drier and not as sweet.

  3. #13
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    Does anyone think cooking method would make much of a difference? For what it's worth, I've only been steaming mine. I've never tried to bake them.

    I'm thinking I'll just have to go talk to a produce manager at one of these stores and see what they know and are able to order.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Special K View Post
    Yeah definitely take a picture the next time you are there and see if you can find any identifying information. Based on my experiences, the terms "purple yam", "purple sweet potato", and even "Okinawan purple sweet potato" are not precise terms and are applied to a range of very different types of purple potatoes.

    I will buy a couple of them next time I go. Both types were long and thin. I don't give the names from the signs much meaning, most things there are not very well labeled, often translated from another language. I am fairly sure the ones that I usually buy (light skinned) are the Okinawan type that everyone seems to be looking for.

  5. #15
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    One other thing I thought of:

    Is it a law that any produce grown outside the US must be irradiated before it enters? If so, wouldn't that apply to most purple sweet potatoes?

  6. #16
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    Baking produces a moist sweet flesh through caramelization, steaming is drier and not as sweet.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Special K View Post
    Does anyone think cooking method would make much of a difference? For what it's worth, I've only been steaming mine. I've never tried to bake them.

    I'm thinking I'll just have to go talk to a produce manager at one of these stores and see what they know and are able to order.
    Not sure if it makes a difference, but I baked mine.

    I've noticed that regular sweet potatoes taste better when baked in the oven rather than sort of steamed in the microwave. But I doubt that steaming would remove the sweetness.

  8. #18
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    They are good sliced thin and fried until crispy in bacon fat.

  9. #19
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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markbt View Post
    They are good sliced thin and fried until crispy in bacon fat.
    What isn't?

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