Limited Time: Grab your FREE Box of Dark Chocolate Almond Bars Get Yours>>Close
Open
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: Primal on a very very tight budget

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1

    Primal on a very very tight budget

    Hi!

    I have visited the forums many times before, but never actually registered. Today however I need some help with going/staying Primal.

    My problem is as follows: I/we (a family of 4 - Mom and Dad + 1 toddler and 1 baby) have a very very tight budget - meaning, it would be very tight for a 'normal' grocery shop, let alone a primal one. However, I would really, really like to eat primal. I have gone primal before, and felt a lot better and on a CW diet. To some extent, I *need* to eat primal, as I urgently need more energy - to care for the children and then work when they sleep in the evening, as we need the income.

    So I would like to ask seasoned Groks what to buy in order to get 'the most bang for my bucks'. How to create a very cheap, yet primal/primalish menu? What can I sacrifice (eg organic vegs, or pastured chicken, or...?)?

    Thanks in advance for your help!
    Rysia

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    79
    I hear you on this!! We are a family of 8 (Mom, dad, and 6 kiddos ages 8 and under). We went primal about 2 months ago. It hasn't been "as bad" as I thought it might be, but yes, we are spending more - probably about $200 a month more on groceries. The thing that has helped the most is simply keeping an eye on sale ads. There is a store this week that has 50% off all roasts... beef and pork of every kind. So, that's what I stocked up on this week!! Another store had 8 pounds of strawberries for $5 - I bought those. When bell peppers go on sale for 3 for a dollar we eat stuffed peppers that week. I plan my meals to some degree around the sales. Also, butter and heavy cream is a cheap source of calories. I make mashed potatoes (with cauliflower puree mixed in) with lots of butter and heavy cream to go along with meat (like the roast that I bought for 50% off) add a spinach salad (I buy organic spinach in bulk at Costco) and you have a great meal for a decent price.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Posts
    32
    I'll probably be burned at the stake for saying this but if you can't afford organic, then you can't afford organic. No biggie.

    Look at the sales, figure out what kind of a menu is going to work for you that week and then do the best you can. You have already taken a huge step towards improving your family's health, don't feel bad (or let anyone else guilt you) because you aren't able to do it "perfectly".

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Posts
    32
    And incorporate lots of eggs! Great protein, good fat and relatively inexpensive. Again, just buy the best quality you can and avoid caged eggs if at all possible.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Posts
    292
    Caged really doesn't mean anything....that is, cage-free doesn't mean anything.....it just means that the chickens had access to the outside via a door, whether they used it or not is another thing.....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Spalding, Lincolnshire
    Posts
    542
    Quote Originally Posted by Barnyard View Post
    cage-free doesn't mean anything.....it just means that the chickens had access to the outside via a door, whether they used it or not is another thing.....
    Nope. Cage free means they weren't kept in cages. Doesn't state anything about being allowed outside. Free range is when they have a door they can use (often when stated by large companies).
    Why use a sledge hammer to crack a nut when a steam roller is even more effective, and, is fun to drive.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Posts
    292
    Quote Originally Posted by Nigel View Post
    Nope. Cage free means they weren't kept in cages. Doesn't state anything about being allowed outside. Free range is when they have a door they can use (often when stated by large companies).
    Sorry, I stand corrected, got my terms confused....but cage free really means nothing because chickens and turkeys are not raised in cages anyway....they are raised in big warehouse-type buildings....see the June 4 post on the Home page from David Maren of Tendergrass Farms....."What You Should Know About Poultry Production Claims".....pretty much any big producer of eggs can make the claim of 'cage-free'

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    California
    Posts
    26
    We are a family of 3, it's just me, my husband and our son. But dang! These boys can eat! Watching the sales ad at our fav grocery store has definitely helped a ton! Also, we have many local farmers markets that are available to us almost every day of the week, so that helps too. May be an option to try as well Good luck!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    California
    Posts
    26
    I should add that Costco has an amazing variety of organic produce now! A huge container of spinach for $3! Can't beat that.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    261
    As other people have mentioned, you don't need to buy all organic fruits and veggies. I basically only buy organic off the dirty dozen list. Your meat doesn't have to be pastured either. Watch for sales and stock up. Potatoes and rice are cheap and filling. I feed my family of 4 on $85/week. I think the biggest step towards improving your health is dropping grains, processed foods and bad oils. After that, you do the best you can with what you have
    www.feedtheclan.com

    Check out my blog to see how a family of four eats real, whole foods on $85/week

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •