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Thread: Food and culture page

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    maba's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel


    This afternoon, when I was serving rice for the hub, I couldn't help feeling a pang of longing - I mean this is what I grew up eating and it is such an integral part of my culture and who I am. And I felt like I suddenly was distancing myself away from this part of me. It wasn't craving, but - not to sound dramatic - a pain of loss. Do any of you feel that way about the foods you grew up on? I know this is a fleeting feeling but felt like sharing it here and asking you all how you feel about the foods you had to give up.


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    Diana Renata's Avatar
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    Oh yeah, there's definitely a mourning process. I really miss my mom's macaroni and cheese, or my dad's lasagna. I suppose if I wanted it bad enough I'd go ahead and eat it, but maybe I'm just stubborn.


    It's kinda like saying goodbye to an old friend. I'm having trouble saying a final goodbye to pizza. I'm going to eat it again eventually and I know it.


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    I think it's that way any time we "grow out of" something. Maybe what we are really mourning the loss of is ourselves (who we were during that time)--especially things from childhood. For me, it's kind of like hearing that favorite song from way back when--bittersweet and fun to hear, but not one I'd play over and over ad nauseum like I did back in the old days. I have a feeling certain foods will be that way for me. . .food is such a social thing, and there are many associations with things like birthday cake, chips and salsa, etc.


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    Yes I feel ya. My grandma used to make me a cherry pie every year for my birthday growing up. After she died, my mom kept the tradition alive whenever I happened to be home for my birthday. This year, I will be home the week after my birthday and ma has asked if she can make me a cherry pie. She said she would do a reduced sugar version. I will accept. It's not something I want to cut out since it's only once a year.


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    here in Nice much of my socialiasing is done around home prepared food, really excellent southern french/italian food. I hate always refusing stuff, so I don't always. The whole diet thing risks alienating me from friends and i don't want that. It's tricky.


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    bpm
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    Agreed- half Italian, half Ukrainian doesn't make for easy eating at family meals, but for me they are rare as I don't live very near my family. I'd say this is a good place for the 80/20 rule. I know some people on the forum are pretty hardcore and I respect that- I am fairly strict myself, but I think now and then(read: a few times a year) you not only can but should indulge in and enjoy foods that are important to you, but have lots of carbs.


    I plan on visiting Italy in the nearish future, and you can bet I'll take a few meals that blow my carb ratios out of the water. When I do, I won't worry about it, and I will relish every bite. I think that's not only ok, but good to do now and again.


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    You know, this is true to the fact that when our ancestors had a treat (buying the sugar and flour to make that special wedding cake, etc.), it was a rarity.


    The obesity issue of late, is, however, very much contributed to by the fact that these previously 'hard-to-find' treats are now extremely easy to obtain.


    I thinks it's ok to indulge once in a while. I am learning how to pick my battles and to control my tendency to go overboard when I do.


    What about Rice? Hubby is following the Primal Blueprint with me and was talking with an Asian gal whose family eats almost NOTHING but rice, veggies and meat. He asked me why, then, are they not a 'heavier' group of people, if they practically all lived on this main carb source? I had no practical explanation to that one.


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    SassaF, I have wondered the same thing myself.I know a lot of ppl. who eat lots of rice, veggies and meat/fat and are very healthy and fit. I never know what to say when dealing with them. They eat that way normally as a culture thing. one friend is from a island culture where the big thing there is eating a bowl of white rice, veggies and pork fat.


    I have been doing PB for a few weeks now, but I haven't gone super hardcore like others just because of the food culture thing. Like if my mom makes me a special dessert (rare) I am not going to turn it down because it was made special for me. She understand when I don't eat rice or pasta she makes regularly, but if I turned down a special "made-this-just-for-you" treat then I know it will really hurt her.


    Picking and choosing is important I think. So is eating and not eating. I figure if I have "bad carbs" rarely it won't be as bad as when i had them all the time.


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    Rice, vegetables, and meat doesn't sound too bad to me. But I guess it depends on how much or little of each. Many Asians are said to eat very large quantities of rice, and I doubt that's good.


    But I think far worse would be white bread, margarine, jam, sugar, processed rather than fresh meats (often containing yet more sugar), commercial ready meals, family-sized packets of potato snacks, and endless quantities of sweet biscuits, chocolate bars, cakes, baked goods, and, of course, fizzy drinks like Coca Cola. Some people really do seem to eat like that. Many men in Northern Europe drink far too much beer, too - as a Briton, I know the temptations of that and the cultural pull, too, myself.


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    maba's Avatar
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    Sassa, In GCBC, Taubes talks about Asian cultures' primary diet being rice but how they are not obese because they practise calorie-restriction. Also, junk, commercially-sold food was unheard of until recently in many Asian countries. It's not like we did not eat carb-rich food, but they were almost always home-made with real ingredients. We also eat LOTS of vegetables, ghee, lentils, coconut etc. My grandmother's generation did not use refiend sugar for the most part, they used jaggery (unrefined, mineral-rice cane sugar) instead.


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