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Thread: Best Primal (and Holdable) Pizza Crust Ever page

  1. #1
    vdm86's Avatar
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    Best Primal (and Holdable) Pizza Crust Ever

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    A while back I had some leftover cooked chicken breasts in my fridge that needed to be used up. I wanted pizza and my meat was cooked, so I went with it. It turned out fantastically--enough so that my husband's response (he's very skeptical of my concoctions sometimes) was, "It's so . . . strange. I feel like I'm eating something bready except that I know it's chicken." I made it again tonight, and now that I know the first one wasn't a fluke, I'm sharing with all of you! This makes a chewy/crispy, thinnish crust pizza which you CAN HOLD. The crust also shrinks as it's cooking, so spread it out thinly and to the edges!

    *Note* This time around I used a 1 lb package of cooked chicken from Trader Joe's. It made about 3 1/2 cups ground, so you could grind a lb of cooked chicken and then just remove a cup if that's easier for you.

    For those who worry about carb counts, the largest carb source in this is the tapioca flour, and I believe the ENTIRE crust has under 30 carbs including the tapioca.

    Best Ever Primal Pizza Crust

    2 1/2 cups of cooked chicken that's been ground in the food processor (you're measuring 2 1/2 cups of ground chicken, not measuring before you chop it)

    1/2 cup grated parmesan

    1/4 cup tapioca flour

    2 eggs

    1 tbsp Italian seasoning

    Salt (if your chicken wasn't salted when you cooked it)

    Directions

    Preheat oven to 400F. Chop your chicken in the food processor. Add the parmesan, tapioca flour, and Italian seasoning. Pulse a few times to combine. At this point the mixture will feel kind of like almond flour does. Add the two eggs, and pulse until it comes together in a ball. The ball is a soft dough that feels somewhat like [SAD] biscuit dough. Spread it out on parchment paper on your pizza sheet or sheets. It perfectly covers my 16 inch diameter pizza sheet. Bake for 10 minutes, spray the top with coconut oil spray (or brush with oil), and flip it over directly onto your pan. Bake another 10 minutes. At this point I take it out, brush it with garlic olive oil (just to create a barrier between crust and sauce so it doesn't get soggy), top it, and put it back in the oven until the cheese is melted and my toppings are warm--usually about 10 minutes.

    Enjoy!428655_571113119395_1257715293_n.jpg983865_573645135215_1929811886_n.jpg

  2. #2
    Antiochia's Avatar
    Antiochia is offline Senior Member
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    Looks interesting -- I'll have to try it!
    Ruth

    "I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody."
    ~Bill Cosby

    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

  3. #3
    blondiegreen's Avatar
    blondiegreen is offline Senior Member
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    Very cool!

  4. #4
    fkjr2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vdm86 View Post
    A while back I had some leftover cooked chicken breasts in my fridge that needed to be used up. I wanted pizza and my meat was cooked, so I went with it. It turned out fantastically--enough so that my husband's response (he's very skeptical of my concoctions sometimes) was, "It's so . . . strange. I feel like I'm eating something bready except that I know it's chicken." I made it again tonight, and now that I know the first one wasn't a fluke, I'm sharing with all of you! This makes a chewy/crispy, thinnish crust pizza which you CAN HOLD. The crust also shrinks as it's cooking, so spread it out thinly and to the edges!

    *Note* This time around I used a 1 lb package of cooked chicken from Trader Joe's. It made about 3 1/2 cups ground, so you could grind a lb of cooked chicken and then just remove a cup if that's easier for you.

    For those who worry about carb counts, the largest carb source in this is the tapioca flour, and I believe the ENTIRE crust has under 30 carbs including the tapioca.

    Best Ever Primal Pizza Crust

    2 1/2 cups of cooked chicken that's been ground in the food processor (you're measuring 2 1/2 cups of ground chicken, not measuring before you chop it)

    1/2 cup grated parmesan

    1/4 cup tapioca flour

    2 eggs

    1 tbsp Italian seasoning

    Salt (if your chicken wasn't salted when you cooked it)

    Directions

    Preheat oven to 400F. Chop your chicken in the food processor. Add the parmesan, tapioca flour, and Italian seasoning. Pulse a few times to combine. At this point the mixture will feel kind of like almond flour does. Add the two eggs, and pulse until it comes together in a ball. The ball is a soft dough that feels somewhat like [SAD] biscuit dough. Spread it out on parchment paper on your pizza sheet or sheets. It perfectly covers my 16 inch diameter pizza sheet. Bake for 10 minutes, spray the top with coconut oil spray (or brush with oil), and flip it over directly onto your pan. Bake another 10 minutes. At this point I take it out, brush it with garlic olive oil (just to create a barrier between crust and sauce so it doesn't get soggy), top it, and put it back in the oven until the cheese is melted and my toppings are warm--usually about 10 minutes.

    Enjoy!428655_571113119395_1257715293_n.jpg983865_573645135215_1929811886_n.jpg

    can we use almond flour instead of tapioca?

  5. #5
    fkjr2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CiKi90 View Post
    Tapioca Flour > Almond Flour, every time. HAVENT YOU HEARD ABOUT THE PUFAS
    I thought nuts were ok on primal?

    What's wrong with them?

    So that means no almonds, cashews, walnuts, etc??

  6. #6
    fkjr2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CiKi90 View Post
    Eating a handful of raw nuts/seeds is no big deal.

    Grinding up nuts into a meal and heating them will cause you to eat way more nuts than you'd have done if they were whole (without even realizing it) and heating nuts causes some of the bad stuff to become more prevalent.

    Raw nuts = ok
    Nut meal = not ok
    Faileo baked goods made with nut meal = omg noooooo

    so if i like to bake - baked goods, pancakes, etc - what do i use?

  7. #7
    darbooks's Avatar
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    Very cool! good info to me,thanks for your sharing

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CiKi90 View Post
    Coconut flour, tapioca flour, rice flour.
    Coconut flour is too dry

    What's tapioca flours profile look like?

    High carb?

  9. #9
    vdm86's Avatar
    vdm86 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by fkjr2 View Post
    Coconut flour is too dry

    What's tapioca flours profile look like?

    High carb?
    Yes, tapioca is a starch, though a pretty benign one and definitely my go-to flour when baking. Coconut flour and tapioca flour mixed together create a pretty good texture. Tapioca on its own has the possibility of getting gummy. Tapioca is also way cheaper than almond or other nut meals. I've found it in Asian groceries for 99 cents a bag.

    If you are wanting to replace the tapioca in the pizza crust, arrowroot would probably work, but I wouldn't use any other flour.

  10. #10
    fkjr2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vdm86 View Post
    Yes, tapioca is a starch, though a pretty benign one and definitely my go-to flour when baking. Coconut flour and tapioca flour mixed together create a pretty good texture. Tapioca on its own has the possibility of getting gummy. Tapioca is also way cheaper than almond or other nut meals. I've found it in Asian groceries for 99 cents a bag.

    If you are wanting to replace the tapioca in the pizza crust, arrowroot would probably work, but I wouldn't use any other flour.
    thanks for the help

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