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Thread: How Do You Roast Your Chicken?

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    How Do You Roast Your Chicken?

    A cooked rotisserie chicken from the grocery store has been a staple of mine for a long time. It is one of my favorite foods! However, In an effort to cut out the additives and preservatives that are found in prepared foods I would like to roast my own. There are a million different roast chicken recipes online so I was wondering if someone could point me in the direction of one that you thought actually tasted like rotisserie chicken so I can eliminate some of the trial and error I would have to go through in recipe testing. Thanks!

  2. #2
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    (This is what I do though I'm not sure how close to rotisserie chicken it will be-its been years since I had one and I've forgotten how they taste.)

    The basic recipe:
    Remove guts from chicken. Pat dry. Season inside and out with salt, garlic, and pepper. Bake breast-side up at 375 degrees for about an hour (till done), baste occasionally if you remember (I usually don't). The chickens I get are usually fatty and even though I trim off as much fat as possible they don't end up dry or tough cooking this way.

    Modifications:
    Wrap with bacon
    Stuff bits of butter under the skin (helps to get the skin really crispy and keep breast meat from drying out-also adds flavor)
    Season with salt, garlic, rosemary, and lemon-pepper inside and out. (Also lay thin slices of lemon over breast area to add lemon flavor)
    Slather BBQ sauce on the last 15-20 minutes of cooking


    Something I've been doing lately to get baked chicken, veggies, and gravy all at once:

    Brown all sides in duck fat using an oven-safe pan. Once brown lay breast-side up and add carrots, onions, and celery to pan and inside chicken. Bake in 350 degree oven for 45 minutes (or till done).
    Remove chicken, set aside to rest.
    Strain veggies from pan liquids for a side dish.
    Add about a cup of water, chicken broth or wine to pan and deglaze the pan. Add 1/4 cup to 1/2 cup heavy cream if you want a creamier gravy. Simmer and reduce to desired thickness. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. You can also leave the veggies in and use an immersion blender to blend them in with the cooking liquids for a thicker gravy.

    You can also pan-fry mushrooms in the cooking liquid and make a tasty gravy from there.
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  3. #3
    Paleobird's Avatar
    Paleobird Guest
    Hello fellow San Diegan!

    Cooking a chicken is really pretty easy. Stick it in the oven at 350 till crispy golden. Maybe turn it over once in the middle of cooking to get both sides evenly.

    From there you can get as fancy as you want to. Try taking a whole lemon and giving it minor stab wounds all over then insert that in the chicken and roast. The lemon flavor infuses into the meat.

    Also add your basic salt and pepper rubdown of the bird before cooking plus any seasonings that tickle your taste buds. A little cayenne pepper is nice and give a pretty color as well.

    Then you can talk about stuffings, but that is a whole different subject.

    Give it a try. Not that hard.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    I do two things, depending on mood:

    Stand the bird up on an upright chicken roaster stand thingy and roast OR

    Spatchcock it and lay it out in a roasting pan. (Spatchcocked chicken is just when you cut through the bird from neck to tail along the backbone in order to lay it out flat - that is all. The breasts are still connected. I have proper poultry shears that do that job in a jiffy, safely.)

    In both cases I rub down with a generous portion of any seasoned salt that takes my fancy at the time (I have several in my spice cabinet). If your bird has some fat on it - all the better, as you will have moist meat that way. Literally roast until the skin is crispy - plain old 350F is good.

    Like Paleobird said, from there you can get fancy. Sometimes I like to rub butter and herbs between the skin and muscles.
    I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

  5. #5
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    I always do it butterfly--remove the backbone then lay each half in a pan.

    Sometimes I'll blast it for like ~8 minutes at 475F to crisp the skin then reduce to 350 until done.
    I'm pretty lazy with the seasonings though. The most effort I'll do is get some "poultry" blend of refrigerated herbs, chop, and sprinkle before cooking. I have an old bottle of Ali's barbecue sauce that works too (uses stevia and molasses).
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Boulder, CO
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    Glad to hear you're wanting to do it yourself. As an added benefit you can use the leftover bones and carcass to make stock, which is one of the best things to have sitting around the kitchen.

    Simple is best. Season it with salt and pepper, truss it with a string, then stick it in the oven at high temperature (usually 425 or 450) for about 50-60 minutes.

    This recipe has never failed me: My Favorite Simple Roast Chicken Recipe at Epicurious.com

  7. #7
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    I'm a big fan of the beer can method for the grill. But it is not quite the same as rotisserie. I bought a Ronco Compact Rotisserie, like THIS ONE, for when I gotta have rotisserie.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRO199 View Post
    I'm a big fan of the beer can method for the grill. But it is not quite the same as rotisserie. I bought a Ronco Compact Rotisserie, like THIS ONE, for when I gotta have rotisserie.
    Ooh, a new toy. How long ago did you buy it? Is it easy to use? Does it feel like something that will last a long time? Inquiring minds (well, my inquiring mind) want to know.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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  9. #9
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    May 2013
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    Thank you all for the suggestions! I think I'll pick one up for roasting this weekend and probably start simple with salt, pepper, lemon & butter.

    I also like the idea of using the carcass to make stock, since I make LOTS of soups! I haven't made my own before, do you add other things like seasonings or veggies or is it just straight up chicken? And how long can I expect it to last in the fridge? Should I freeze it if I'm not planning on using it right away?

  10. #10
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    May 2013
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    Boulder, CO
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pax View Post
    Thank you all for the suggestions! I think I'll pick one up for roasting this weekend and probably start simple with salt, pepper, lemon & butter.

    I also like the idea of using the carcass to make stock, since I make LOTS of soups! I haven't made my own before, do you add other things like seasonings or veggies or is it just straight up chicken? And how long can I expect it to last in the fridge? Should I freeze it if I'm not planning on using it right away?
    I like to add onions and carrots, maybe some herbs like thyme or bay leaves for more flavor. You can save all the roots of veggies to throw into stock, that works really well. Stock should be good for at least a week in the fridge, and freeze it if you're going to be waiting longer than that to use it.

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