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Thread: How Do You Roast Your Chicken? page 2

  1. #11
    Crabbcakes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pax View Post
    I also like the idea of using the carcass to make stock, since I make LOTS of soups! I haven't made my own before, do you add other things like seasonings or veggies or is it just straight up chicken? And how long can I expect it to last in the fridge? Should I freeze it if I'm not planning on using it right away?
    You can do it both ways:

    Plain bones with just some salt and a splash of vinegar to help extract that goodness. OR

    Bones with salt and a splash of vinegar and added veggies and herbs.

    The difference will depend on the ultimate use for your broth - if you are doing some Asian cooking and need plain chicken broth, I doubt you would want European kitchen herb flavor in that batch, for example. On the other hand, if you are making American-style chicken soup, then that would be absolutely yummy.

    My usual batch of add-ins is this: to the bones and chickeny bits - a head of garlic simply sliced across the middle, an onion sliced in half, sea salt, peppercorns, fresh parsley stem and all, a tomato sliced in half, a couple of carrots snapped into a couple of pieces, a couple stalks celery snapped on half, some fresh thyme if my herb garden is producing at the time, and a fresh bay leaf if I have some on hand. I peel nothing - the hot water sterilizes everything. Sometimes I slice off the root end of the garlic if it is actually dirty. When everything is simmered to the point at which all veggies are limp and tasteless, I am done. Then I strain and use right away or refrigerate.

    We normally never freeze broth because it gets eaten too fast at this house to ever make it there... I have four broth-loving teens/preteens and a hubby to feed.

    Just use a pot big enough to prevent overboiling, and keep the lid on. And I always simmer, not boil - I taste a difference between the hard-boiled and simmered broth. In that vein, a crock pot works well, too!

    I know you are asking about chicken stock, but the best stock I have recently made was with mixed bones from chicken, turkey, pork with the plain sea salt and vinegar. Oh, wow. And don't worry about the vinegar - its smell and taste completely, totally disappears during cooking.
    Last edited by Crabbcakes; 06-04-2013 at 05:20 PM.
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by lemontwisst View Post
    I always brine a chicken before roasting it, for at least 24 hours. It's pretty simple...make a brine of 1/4c. salt to a gallon of water, add whatever herbs and spices you like. Toss your bird in a bag, cover it with the brine, tie up the bag and put it in the fridge (in a big bowl or something for stability and to save the day if the bag leaks/tears). After brining, rinse the bird well, inside and out, then pat dry and season it how you want. I like rubbing the breast (under the skin) with butter, then stuffing smashed garlic cloves and slices of lemon between the meat and skin. More butter rubbed on the outside, salt and pepper all over, maybe some slices of lemon and springs of dill or rosemary in the cavity then roast at 350 until it's done. The stand-up beer can roaster things work really well.
    I don't like the rubbery skin with conventionally brined chicken. This works really well and keeps a crispy skin

    Injection-Brining

    especially if you leave the bird out to dry externally for a couple of hours, and then gently ease butter between the skin and the breast.

  3. #13
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    I dunno how rotisserie chicken tastes, never bought one, but I make dry roasted birds the same way always. Paper-towel dry the skin, salt and pepper the cavity, pour salt all over the outside, plop onto the baking rack (I make 2 at a time), bake for 20 min at 450 and for another 45 (or longer) on 325 till done. Crispy skin, tender flesh, juicy.

    I roast vegetables in the run-off collected juices/fat separately as I find that the bed of vegetables slows the cooking and soggies up the skin.

    And, yeah, we collect all bones in the bones bucket for stocks.
    Last edited by Leida; 06-05-2013 at 07:19 AM.
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  4. #14
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    I always slow-cook the bird first and then stick it under the grill to crisp the skin. I rub the 2.5lbs chicken with butter mixed with herbs, garlic or whatever spice I feel like, put it on one of those disposable aluminium roasting trays and pack it into slowcooker for 4-5hours, I pour a little bit of water around the tray but never into the tray. After this the bird is done and meat is literally falling of the bone, it's just the skin that needs a little bit more attention, so it goes under the grill at the highest temp for half an hour or less, I flip the bird over at the halftime to get both side done equally. I prepare my side dishes while the chicken is grilling. Delicious! with next to no effort and cheaper on our electricity bills

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pax View Post
    Thank you all for the suggestions! I think I'll pick one up for roasting this weekend and probably start simple with salt, pepper, lemon & butter.

    I also like the idea of using the carcass to make stock, since I make LOTS of soups! I haven't made my own before, do you add other things like seasonings or veggies or is it just straight up chicken? And how long can I expect it to last in the fridge? Should I freeze it if I'm not planning on using it right away?
    I like to add onions and carrots, maybe some herbs like thyme or bay leaves for more flavor. You can save all the roots of veggies to throw into stock, that works really well. Stock should be good for at least a week in the fridge, and freeze it if you're going to be waiting longer than that to use it.
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  6. #16
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    I cook mine in a solar oven. As it is slow, moist cooking I put vegetables in with it, usually garlic and brassica family members. Three hours later it is done and delicious.

  7. #17
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    we brown ours off really quick in the iron skillet, and the pop them (we cook too at a time) into the crock pot for 4 hrs. skin isn't crispy. but, makes it easy to clear the bones of meat and set it to bone broth making.

  8. #18
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    I'm a very rough and ready cook. I tend to rinse out the bird, smear coconut oil over it and put a bit more in the pan, then stick it in the (fan) oven at 190C. It's usually a small bird but turns out nice and crispy but still moist inside. I don't season as I find the flavour of the chicken good enough. I usually roast onions and spuds in the tray and I don't use a rack at all. The skin ends up crispy on top and soft underneath, but I stick the soft skin in the frying pan the next day with the left overs and it doesn't stay soft for long. Mmmmm.
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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRO199 View Post
    I'm a big fan of the beer can method for the grill. But it is not quite the same as rotisserie. I bought a Ronco Compact Rotisserie, like THIS ONE, for when I gotta have rotisserie.
    Ooh, a new toy. How long ago did you buy it? Is it easy to use? Does it feel like something that will last a long time? Inquiring minds (well, my inquiring mind) want to know.
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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leida View Post
    I dunno how rotisserie chicken tastes, never bought one, but I make dry roasted birds the same way always. Paper-towel dry the skin, salt and pepper the cavity, pour salt all over the outside, plop onto the baking rack (I make 2 at a time), bake for 20 min at 450 and for another 45 (or longer) on 325 till done. Crispy skin, tender flesh, juicy.

    I roast vegetables in the run-off collected juices/fat separately as I find that the bed of vegetables slows the cooking and soggies up the skin.

    And, yeah, we collect all bones in the bones bucket for stocks.
    This is close to my method as well, but before roasting I also add a celery stalk, a couple sprigs of fresh rosemary, 1/2 a bunch of cilantro, and a cup of sake to the cavity of each bird in addition to the salt and pepper.

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