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Thread: Non-Dairy Based Protein Shakes? page 3

  1. #21
    RichMahogany's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynna View Post
    Protein Absorption and Eggs

    Some older athletic diets use to propose eating just raw eggs. This is a foolish attempt at taking in additional protein. Eating raw eggs (or raw egg whites) will only result in about 50% absorption of the available protein. That means that if you eat enough raw eggs to give you 40 grams of protein, your body will only absorb 20 grams.

    Eating just raw egg whites results in the same (or worse). Egg whites have a huge amount of a substance called "avidin," which loves biotin. As a matter of fact, once the avidin-biotin forms a bond, the body can't break it apart. So you will develop a partial or full Biotin Deficiency Syndrome. Cooking your eggs (or egg whites) will quickly denature the protein avidin and will allow you to absorb 98% of the protein. In short, always cook your eggs.

    From here:

    Bodybuilding.com - Protein, The Most Up To Date Information.

    There is also some other good information on protein in the article, including this page about different kinds of protein powders.

    Protein Powders, Shakes, Drinks, & Supplements at Bodybuilding.com!
    It's more like 65% for raw vs. 91% for cooked. Significant, but the solution is just to eat more raw eggs.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    It's more like 65% for raw vs. 91% for cooked. Significant, but the solution is just to eat more raw eggs.
    I guess you missed the part about the avidin in egg whites causing biotin deficiency. Eating more raw eggs = bigger biotin deficiency.

    Also from the link mentioned in my previous post.

    Biotin Deficiency

    The formation of a biotin deficiency from raw eggs has been recognized in science as far back as 1926. Rats were given raw egg whites and developed the symptoms of hair loss, loss of muscle coordination, severe dermatitis, exhaustion, muscle pain, and dry hair or eyes.

    The raw eggs contain the glycoprotein avidin, which breaks down very quickly when cooked. This avidin chemical has a huge interest in the amino acid biotin and bonds to it immediately. Many foods contain biotin and there are normal bacteria in the intestines that produce biotin.

    The long-term use of antibiotics make the athlete further susceptible to biotin deficiencies, due to the destruction of the bacteria in the intestinal tract.

    What Does Biotin Do?

    Biotin (a water-soluble B-class vitamin) helps utilize other B's, aides the Krebs Cycle (energy) in the synthesis of fats & proteins, and also helps in cell reproduction (growth).

    What Is The Krebs Cycle?
    The Krebs Cycle (a.k.a "Citric Acid Cycle", "Tri-Carboxylic Acid Cycle" or "TCA Cycle") is a complex sequence of biochemical enzymatic reactions that is known to be responsible for how much fat is lost through the dissipation of Acetyl-CoA.

    If the TCA cycle slows down, then fat loss is prohibited (fatty acids cannot be fully degraded). The Krebs Cycle involves oxidative metabolism of acetyl units and produces high-energy phosphate compounds, which serve as the main source of cellular energy.

    The Krebs Cycle is named in recognition of the German chemist Hans Krebs, whose research into the cellular utilization of glucose contributed greatly to the modern understanding of this aspect of metabolism.

  3. #23
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    Maybe you missed the fact that yolks have biotin. I don't think eating whole raw eggs is an issue. Eating raw egg whites could be a problem.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    Maybe you missed the fact that yolks have biotin. I don't think eating whole raw eggs is an issue. Eating raw egg whites could be a problem.
    Yes, but the avidin in the whites limits the absorption of the biotin in the yolks, unless you either consume fertilized eggs, in which the avidin is neutralized, or cook the whites. If you increase your consumption of raw eggs, you will consume a higher level of avidin which will bind the biotin and prevent its absorption.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynna View Post
    Yes, but the avidin in the whites limits the absorption of the biotin in the yolks
    We're in agreement so far...
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynna View Post
    If you increase your consumption of raw eggs, you will consume a higher level of avidin which will bind the biotin and prevent its absorption.
    But you'll concomitantly consume a higher level of biotin for the avidin to bind, assuming you're eating the whole egg. Hence my point that there's no danger* in eating raw, whole eggs.

    *of biotin deficiency

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