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  1. #901
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    My world view has been shattered here at MDA. I have learned that a lot of men with big muscles aren't strong, just vain and that there are way more fake boobs out there than I thought were possible. All my life I've just gone with exactly what I was given. No surgery, no cutlets in my bra, no hair color, no waxing, no botox. No wonder I've struggled.

    Now give it to me straight: those women bench pressing 100+lbs and deadlifting 300+lbs are on steroids, right?
    No steroids here - ~115lbs bench press - 1 rep max probably 135 - I'm 55. You can do it! I've been at it off and on (unfortunately) for 4-5 years. Squat max is 185 and when I first started I couldn't even lift the bar in proper form!!

  2. #902
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    Okay, I won't feel so bad I can bench 80lbs (well, I will try on Monday) after 8 months and pretty much lifting around 70-75 for the last several months.

    Last night I was hiking with a guy who asked me how many days a week I go hiking. I told him only one. He said that's not much to stay in shape for hiking. I told him I lift weights during the week and that's all it takes to keep me in shape for hiking. He said he hadn't lifted weights since high school (in his 60s). I should have asked why, but the rest of our conversation made it sound like he figures it's too dangerous and that hiking every day is healthier. I don't know if it is or it isn't. It's maybe more fun to hike every day if you have the time. I know from my experience that trying to hike every day takes up a lot of your time and you begin to resent how much time you spend getting exercise when you could be doing other things. Lifting weights is a lot more efficient use of time, that's for sure.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 180 x 2. Current Deadlift: 230 x 2

  3. #903
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leida View Post
    There was a gazillion of threads about why women won't lift weights, but what totally blows my mind is why men won't lift weights. The impact is sooooo dramatic and wonderful in men, and like causes both fat loss & muscle gain, why the heck do I see all these men hunching on the treadmills next to the elfin cardio queens? Are men afraid to get bulky, lol?
    Here's what I think is the reason:
    1. I learned it is better to start bulking when you are lean rather than starting the bulk when you are overweight then cut (Please tell me I am right on this?).
    2. According to the conventional wisdom, cardio is associated with weight loss and weight lifting is associated with bulking.
    3. Since most men are not lean or they are overweight they may want to get lean first by focusing more on cardio and less on lifting weights. In addition, overly following the conventional wisdom, men may think more of something that gets them leaner is going to get them leaner faster.
    4. Therefore, being ignorant to the fact that performing only cardio is likely to result in both a fat and muscle loss, they avoid lifting. Consequently, they lose muscle and strength.
    5. This becomes a vicious cycle where men may not want to go to the weight room to avoid seeing fit guys with huge muscles and they do more cardio and lose more muscle.
    At least that's what my experience has been for years, and one day I came to my senses when I saw a lady bench pressing 135 lbs next to me - bench pressing 65 (like a cardio exercise)!
    Well, that was my excuse. But I quit that going primal.

  4. #904
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    Your notions about bulking and being lean before you lift weights are probably wrong.
    T NATION | Truth About Bulking

    It's unfortunate that men think the way you described. If I thought that way, I'd still be waiting for a miracle in body composition change and still be weak and fat.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 180 x 2. Current Deadlift: 230 x 2

  5. #905
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    Now give it to me straight: those women bench pressing 100+lbs and deadlifting 300+lbs are on steroids, right?
    Back in the days when my weight was 180, before I had a run-in with gluten, my all-time max BP was 160. I am currently at about 118. No steroids here.

  6. #906
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahuderot View Post
    Here's what I think is the reason:
    1. I learned it is better to start bulking when you are lean rather than starting the bulk when you are overweight then cut (Please tell me I am right on this?).
    2. According to the conventional wisdom, cardio is associated with weight loss and weight lifting is associated with bulking.
    3. Since most men are not lean or they are overweight they may want to get lean first by focusing more on cardio and less on lifting weights. In addition, overly following the conventional wisdom, men may think more of something that gets them leaner is going to get them leaner faster.
    4. Therefore, being ignorant to the fact that performing only cardio is likely to result in both a fat and muscle loss, they avoid lifting. Consequently, they lose muscle and strength.
    5. This becomes a vicious cycle where men may not want to go to the weight room to avoid seeing fit guys with huge muscles and they do more cardio and lose more muscle.
    At least that's what my experience has been for years, and one day I came to my senses when I saw a lady bench pressing 135 lbs next to me - bench pressing 65 (like a cardio exercise)!
    Well, that was my excuse. But I quit that going primal.
    I'll give you my thoughts on 'Why Men Won't Lift Weights'.

    I'm 50 years old and never worked out in my life until about 3 years ago. I was 5'9" and around 180lbs and my weight varied 5lbs either way since I was about 20 years old. As I got older, people often commented that I was looking good but I believe it was mostly due to the fact that most other people got much heavier as they aged.

    About three years ago, a close friend had a heart attack and that was kind of a wake-up call for me. I wasn't heavy but I was soft and leading a sedentary lifestyle. I joined our University gym and didn't have a clue. I started doing cardio, mostly elliptical machine, and some bodyweight exercises (push-ups, dips, chin-ups) 3- 4 times a week.

    I started dropping weight and got down to about 165 after a year, felt very good and people were noticing the difference. But....for that first year I was interested in hitting the weights but didn't for a few of reasons.

    1 - I didn't have a clue what to do or where to start
    2 - I didn't want to bulk up, I wanted to stay fairly lean
    3 - I didn't want to look like a (old) fool
    4 - I have a wonky back that I was afraid I would screw up

    I researched the web for a couple of months and found a beginners workout and gave it a try. I wasn't weak but I wasn't strong either. My first workout - let's just say that I really didn't know what I was doing and felt really out of place 'lifting' next to some pretty strong guys and gals. BTW, I was sore as hell the next day! After my first leg workout, I could barely climb the steps to get to the change room....seriously, it was that bad.

    Anyway, I stuck with it and learned how to lift properly. As for cardio, I've ended up doing it more as a warmup to get the blood flowing and get a bit of a sweat before hitting the weights. I do about 15 - 20 minutes of jogging (I ride the bike or hit the elliptical every once in a while to change it up).

    After about 6 months, my weight barely budged from 165lbs but I was getting leaner and stronger, much stronger. People were once again noticing the difference and I am feeling fantastic. You know that old adage, you lose weight to look good but you workout to look good naked.....if I don't say so myself, I'm looking much better naked! I'm glad to say my wife has really noticed and it actually motivated her to start to get in great shape.

    As for my fears:

    1 - it is a intimidating when you begin but shortly after beginning, I started to get more and more comfortable and now feel right at home

    2 - I didn't bulk up per say. My arms, chest, shoulders and back have become solid but it actually takes a tremendous amount of effort and food to really bulk up (and as I stated earlier, I didn't want that either). I've added muscle and lost fat.

    3 - I don't feel like an old fool. I feel awesome and one thing I've learned over the past couple of years, if you keep at it, you really get the respect of the regulars. They appreciate an older guy who keeps at it, they really do. My son-in-laws best buddy saw me a couple of months ago and later told him the old guy is really getting ripped.

    4 - As for my back, I was extremely cautious when I began and was afraid I was going to cripple myself. I started slow and easy and I won't lie, dead lifts and squats would occasionally kill me. But, it was worth it. I haven't had a backache in a year and a half and don't even think about it anymore. This may have been the biggest benefit of all.

    5 - During my first year of mostly cardio, it was more of a chore to hit the gym. I did it consistently but it had a lot to do with willpower. Now, I really look forward to hitting the gym 3 or 4 times a week and regret when I miss a day. Due to a bunch of circumstances, I missed about 10 days in a row and it was killing me. I killed it when I got back


    Sorry to ramble but I believe fear of the unknown and embarrassment are the biggest reasons men are afraid to lift. It took me a while to work up the will to do it but I'm so happy that I got over the hump and did it.

    I'm 50 and in the best shape of my life and have never felt better. I can play with my 3 year old grandson all day long and keep up with my four kids who are all in their 20's.

    No bull, if I can do it you can do it. It's not my style to write posts but I've been following this one and it really hit a nerve.

  7. #907
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    Papou, that was a great post! I believe that is exactly why my husband is reluctant to lift. I'm going to save your post and if/when the time is right I'd like to pass it on to him to read.
    Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

  8. #908
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    Quote Originally Posted by Papou View Post
    I'll give you my thoughts on 'Why Men Won't Lift Weights'.

    I'm 50 years old and never worked out in my life until about 3 years ago.

    <snip>

    I'm 50 and in the best shape of my life and have never felt better. I can play with my 3 year old grandson all day long and keep up with my four kids who are all in their 20's.

    No bull, if I can do it you can do it. It's not my style to write posts but I've been following this one and it really hit a nerve.
    Awesome Papou, thanks for your post.
    If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

    Quote Originally Posted by tfarny View Post
    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

  9. #909
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    Your notions about bulking and being lean before you lift weights are probably wrong.
    T NATION | Truth About Bulking

    It's unfortunate that men think the way you described. If I thought that way, I'd still be waiting for a miracle in body composition change and still be weak and fat.
    I like that article.

    It raises a point I've been thinking about with this taking of bulking and cutting; normal people do not needed to "bulk". Sure, you may want to add some muscle, so train right and eat some extra good. But you don't need to go crazy and easy everything in sight knowing that you'll put on fat but thinking "that's ok because I'll cut down and lean out afterwards". I've tried that in the pay and it sucked (for me, ymmv).

    The following is from an interview with the great old school body builder Frank Zane:

    Muscle & Strength: It is fairly common in the modern era to see trainees engaging in endless cycles of bulking and cutting. Was bulking a common practice during your era? Did you eat X amount of calories above your maintenance level? If not, how did you eat in the off-season, and how many pounds over your competition weight did you allow yourself to get?

    Frank Zane: I tried bulking up a few times and it was always a disaster. It was just a loss of about a year because you get back to what you looked like originally. What happened when I did that...Actually I did that for training for the 1972 professional Mr. Universe in London. I got up to about almost 210, huge thighs. I got pretty smooth. About 5 weeks before the contest I realized I had a lot of work to do, so I dropped about 10 pounds, came in around the mid 190s and won the show. But I noticed that I was not as defined as I was the year before because I bulked up. The year before I didnít, so I learned from that.

    And that was not the last time I made that mistake. I learned that really for me not to go above 5 percent over my competitive weight that meant staying under 200 or even in the lower 190s. I was not focused on body weight, I was more focused on what I looked like. You know what difference does the numbers make. You are not judged on that, you are judged on what you looked like. So everybody is weighing themselves and doing body fat analysis. I took photos. I took a lot of color slides. Tens of thousands, so that way I knew what I looked like. And so I had full control over that. Look, when I got on stage I knew what I looked like. Nobody else really did, because they did not do this. I was the only one that took photos.

    Muscle & Strength: How did you adjust your diet when you needed to drop a few extra pounds? Did you do anything like carb cycling or dropping carbohydrates, or did you just cut back on food intake?

    Frank Zane: I always ate a restricted carbohydrate diet. I would keep my carbohydrate intake lower than my protein intake. If I needed a boost, like if I was not getting pumped from my workout, I would eat more carbohydrates. Generally I ran in 4 day cycles. I would eat low carbs for 3 days and eat more on the 4th. I really did not go too much over 3000 calories when I trained. It has always been between two and three thousand calories a day. I really was not big on doing radical things. I think that is the biggest mistake, because it is going to affect you in ways you do not even know.
    -------------------------


    The full interview's a good read and can be found here:
    http://www.muscleandstrength.com/art...rank-zane.html
    Last edited by Misabi; 06-24-2013 at 12:49 AM.
    If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

    Quote Originally Posted by tfarny View Post
    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

  10. #910
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    Back in the days when my weight was 180, before I had a run-in with gluten, my all-time max BP was 160. I am currently at about 118. No steroids here.
    Quote Originally Posted by snoops View Post
    No steroids here - ~115lbs bench press - 1 rep max probably 135 - I'm 55. You can do it! I've been at it off and on (unfortunately) for 4-5 years. Squat max is 185 and when I first started I couldn't even lift the bar in proper form!!
    I need to start a topic called "So, why old women are so weak?"

    Quote Originally Posted by Papou View Post
    3 - I don't feel like an old fool. I feel awesome and one thing I've learned over the past couple of years, if you keep at it, you really get the respect of the regulars. They appreciate an older guy who keeps at it, they really do. My son-in-laws best buddy saw me a couple of months ago and later told him the old guy is really getting ripped.
    Your post is awesome. The part I quoted, I have noticed this, too. People respect me for showing up even if I don't lift impressively. It impresses them that I lift more than when I first showed up and that I keep coming back. Mostly people don't talk or look at me much at all.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 180 x 2. Current Deadlift: 230 x 2

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