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  1. #11
    diene's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    Then I was shown how to do an overhead squat with a 25lb bar. Holy crap. So THAT'S what the core does? I have no core strength at all.
    I suck at overhead squats. You also have to keep your shoulders engaged the whole time. The shoulders are another body part that's not used to being engaged. But, it's true, when the bar's heavy, as soon as I relax my shoulders, even for split second, the bar tips forward and I lose it.

  2. #12
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    A strong core is all about alignment and function. If you misuse a lever to move a rock the rock does't get moved and you can hurt yourself. No different with weights and the like. Core strenght assures the right muscles are being worked, and working in their optimum attitude. That reduces chance of injury. Unfortunately I see a lot of people in the gym on their way to serious injury because of bad core and form. Two areas very prone to such abuse in the lower back and rotator cuff regions.

  3. #13
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    Thanks for continuing to share your knowledge Zoe
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

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    Quote Originally Posted by serenity View Post
    I suck at overhead squats. You also have to keep your shoulders engaged the whole time. The shoulders are another body part that's not used to being engaged. But, it's true, when the bar's heavy, as soon as I relax my shoulders, even for split second, the bar tips forward and I lose it.
    I'm pretty sure that if I continued the Olympic lifts I would build a nice strong core. However, I have no place to do them. Yes, I know some of you read my thread on SS. You almost had me convinced, but I'm pretty sure I'd break my deck or crash through the roof so I think it's not going to happen.

    I don't think you are supposed to relax your shoulders. It would not work if they were not tight.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    I can squat 180lbs, press 72.5lbs and deadlift 185lbs

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    I'm pretty sure that if I continued the Olympic lifts I would build a nice strong core. However, I have no place to do them. Yes, I know some of you read my thread on SS. You almost had me convinced, but I'm pretty sure I'd break my deck or crash through the roof so I think it's not going to happen.
    You should try crossfit.

  6. #16
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    I never heard about the all-important core when I was younger. Pilates does help build it; yoga also and most Callanetics type exercise. I sometimes wonder if it's more for aesthetics than anything else.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Green Deane View Post
    A strong core is all about alignment and function. If you misuse a lever to move a rock the rock does't get moved and you can hurt yourself. No different with weights and the like. Core strenght assures the right muscles are being worked, and working in their optimum attitude. That reduces chance of injury. Unfortunately I see a lot of people in the gym on their way to serious injury because of bad core and form. Two areas very prone to such abuse in the lower back and rotator cuff regions.
    To rectify this experts in rehab and prehab use Turkish Get-ups. This improves muscle imbalance and works the core.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4Q9mxjhMy8

    This gives you a breakdown on the technique
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNVi6H3OUVs

  8. #18
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    Zoe,

    I'm thinking that a lot of exercises that are meant to improve core strength (such as plank), are actually more about co-ordination, which is why someone might be able to hold a plank for five mins but can't do a chin up.

    What do you think?
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    I'm pretty sure that if I continued the Olympic lifts I would build a nice strong core. However, I have no place to do them. Yes, I know some of you read my thread on SS. You almost had me convinced, but I'm pretty sure I'd break my deck or crash through the roof so I think it's not going to happen.

    I don't think you are supposed to relax your shoulders. It would not work if they were not tight.
    The deck will be fine. No snatching on the roof.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by fiercehunter View Post
    I never heard about the all-important core when I was younger. Pilates does help build it; yoga also and most Callanetics type exercise. I sometimes wonder if it's more for aesthetics than anything else.
    I can guarantee it's not just for aesthetics. Through all my years of weak core/muscle spasms/not being able to do much activity wise my core got very weak and my lower back over-compensated. I didn't realize any of this until my pain levels and flare-ups reduced to the point where I could work out again without going into muscle spasms. Abhorrently weak transverse abs combined with over-compensating lower back trying to support everything gave me a sway I didn't even know was abnormal it had been there so long. Enter lifting and running, an injury, and a trip to the PT where I found this out.

    After spending a lot of time on deep ab work my back sways less, my lifting form is better and running and other exercise doesn't make my back sore as much anymore as long as I apply what I've learned and pay attention to my core. I still have a long way to go but I can feel and see a difference and my movement is definitely improved in many areas.
    Every moment of life does not have to be perfect to be of value --Winnie Dalley

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