Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 36

Thread: Lucid Dreams page 2

  1. #11
    JoanieL's Avatar
    JoanieL is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    It's not the heat, it's the stupidity.
    Posts
    8,205
    I never knew there was a term for this. The recurring theme in my dreams that lets me know I'm dreaming is that I reach for my ringing phone, and the caller ID is showing someone who in real life has died. I pinch myself to wake myself up. If I can't control it enough to pinch myself, I dig my nails into my palms until I wake up. I don't wanna talk to dead people.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

  2. #12
    jackaaron's Avatar
    jackaaron is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    US
    Posts
    64
    Here's how I have lucid dreams, take it fwiw, and I don't them every night (more on that later):

    You have to concentrate on your daily routine a lot. For example, as I sit here typing this, I can read the letters, and I can read everything I'm writing. This is all very vivid, and "real," (obviously). But, I question it, constantly (if I want to have lucid dreams) because you have to get used to actually questioning things enough to do it in your dream.

    It's a habit, and you have to gain the habit, and it can be exhausting, and it's an easy to lose habit. I'm typing. Is this real? I'm looking at a computer screen that's very detailed with words, is this real?

    Eventually, you can ask this question in a dream. And, once you ask it, and figure out that it's not real, you realize you're in a dream, and you can do whatever you want.

    Don't worry, normal dreams still allow for this. But, the more weird the dream, the easier (in my opinion) it is to eventually get to a lucid dream.

    Also, while in the dream, never worry about it lasting. When you wake up from it, try to appreciate the even five seconds you've had. The more you appreciate what you experience, I personally think the longer they eventually happen.

    I don't have them every night, as I said earlier, because I don't concentrate on it daily. It's more like a "want" that I remind myself of occasionally, and eventually revisit from time to time. It takes time to build up to having them, and you have to constantly keep up with the mental exercises of questioning if this is real, or not, etc.

  3. #13
    Jefferson1775's Avatar
    Jefferson1775 is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,895
    Quote Originally Posted by jackaaron View Post
    You have to concentrate on your daily routine a lot. For example, as I sit here typing this, I can read the letters, and I can read everything I'm writing. This is all very vivid, and "real," (obviously). But, I question it, constantly (if I want to have lucid dreams) because you have to get used to actually questioning things enough to do it in your dream.

    It's a habit, and you have to gain the habit, and it can be exhausting, and it's an easy to lose habit. I'm typing. Is this real? I'm looking at a computer screen that's very detailed with words, is this real?

    Eventually, you can ask this question in a dream. And, once you ask it, and figure out that it's not real, you realize you're in a dream, and you can do whatever you want.
    Thanks, this is very interesting. I'll try to make it a habit.
    In matters of style, swim with the current. In matters of principle, stand like a rock.

    This message has been intercepted by the NSA, the only branch of government that listens.

  4. #14
    PrimalHunter's Avatar
    PrimalHunter is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    112
    This might seem weird, but can someone explain what a regular (non-lucid) dream is like? It wasn't until I saw Inception that I suspected my dreams are different from other peoples'.

    I can close my eyes right now and daydream that I'm flying. I have full control over everything, but it doesn't feel terribly real. That's the same for everyone, right?

    As far as regular dreams go, I don't remember much from them, but I don't think they're much more vivid than my daydreams. I can't imagine a dream being so realistic that I thought for a moment it was the real world.

    I don't understand at all when people say things like it took them a while to learn how to fly, as if a dream weren't just a movie they're playing in their mind, and they're both the director and the lead actor.
    "Don't go in there, General, it's a trap! That's a grain chamber. It makes people like you into people like me."

  5. #15
    EatMoveSleep's Avatar
    EatMoveSleep is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    513
    Quote Originally Posted by PrimalHunter View Post
    This might seem weird, but can someone explain what a regular (non-lucid) dream is like? It wasn't until I saw Inception that I suspected my dreams are different from other peoples'.

    I can close my eyes right now and daydream that I'm flying. I have full control over everything, but it doesn't feel terribly real. That's the same for everyone, right?

    As far as regular dreams go, I don't remember much from them, but I don't think they're much more vivid than my daydreams. I can't imagine a dream being so realistic that I thought for a moment it was the real world.

    I don't understand at all when people say things like it took them a while to learn how to fly, as if a dream weren't just a movie they're playing in their mind, and they're both the director and the lead actor.

    Um....what you saying and asking is contradicting ....and confusing.

    Daydreaming or imagining is not like sleep dreaming .... I can daydream that I'm flying now too.....but sleep dreaming if different.... being conscious of dreaming and controlling it is different again.

    The regular dreams you described ARE non-Lucid dreams (maybe a bit blurry and may be not very clear, or very clear but you dont realize your asleep and its a dream)

    Lucid are dreams that your consciousness is aware you're dreaming ( you actually think to your self hey, I'm asleep and dreaming - I Know I'm in a dream now)

    Lucid dreams can be a bit blurry too.

    And yes the dreams can be super clear, super detailed views, super imagination.
    Entering a Wake Induced Lucid Dream ( the entry bit) can be a very weird experience as you are entering the dream completely conscious.

    So you have never had a nightmare and woke up scared or yelling - this is a completely foreign concept to you? ( if you knew it wasn't real why be scared).

    Well lucid dreams can be super clear and you're thinking just like your are now, the dreams can look and feel like reality.

    Thoughts you are having now, the words you're reading, all your external perceptions are feed into your brain, the brain is using chemical and electrical signals and creating your conscious experience your having now - is it real?
    Last edited by EatMoveSleep; 05-30-2013 at 07:32 AM.

  6. #16
    MrsToon's Avatar
    MrsToon is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Posts
    264
    the website How To Trick Your Body Into Falling Asleep To Have Your First OBEs And Lucid Dreams In The Minimum Amount Of Time is an incredible resource. This guy has been testing every method for lucidity for years, and has pared it down to the most effective and useful techniques. I have used his "Stop, Drop, and Roll" technique to conk out to sleep on a regular basis, and his whole method for tricking the body into thinking the brain is asleep, has led to some really awesome "wake into lucid dream" or "WILD" experiences. I reccommend checking out his youtube vids, practice his basics, and when that works, get his other videos. Happy dreaming!

    BTW my check for dreaming is basically to see if I can float. Then it's off to fly and explore the unusual buildings. I love putting myself thru mirrors and finding out what's on the other side. Some tips to stay in a dream if things start fading out... rub your hands together quickly; spin in place until things settle down again.

  7. #17
    PrimalHunter's Avatar
    PrimalHunter is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    112
    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    Um....what you saying and asking is contradicting ....and confusing.
    Yeah, I'm not really sure what to ask because I don't know what I don't understand.

    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    Daydreaming or imagining is not like sleep dreaming .... I can daydream that I'm flying now too.....but sleep dreaming if different
    Yeah, I get that those things are a bit different, but...

    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    .... being conscious of dreaming and controlling it is different again.
    This is what I don't get. Until I heard about lucid dreaming, I wasn't even aware that we're usually not conscious of dreaming. Why does it matter? Why is being conscious that you're dreaming you're flying so different from just dreaming you're flying?

    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    The regular dreams you described ARE non-Lucid dreams (maybe a bit blurry and may be not very clear, or very clear but you dont realize your asleep and its a dream)
    As far as I can tell, my dreams are never very clear at all. Certainly not like in Inception where they have color, sound, touch, plot, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    Lucid are dreams that your consciousness is aware you're dreaming ( you actually think to your self hey, I'm asleep and dreaming - I Know I'm in a dream now)
    That's what I've heard, but I don't understand why that's a big deal. It doesn't really matter if I'm just daydreaming or I'm daydreaming while thinking "Hey, I'm daydreaming!" Why is awareness so important in actual dreams?

    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    Lucid dreams can be a bit blurry too.
    Oh, I didn't know that. I thought they were always super detailed.

    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    And yes the dreams can be super clear, super detailed views, super imagination.
    So is it more about the quality of the dream, rather than the fact that you're conscious? Would a super clear non-lucid dream be really cool too?

    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    So you have never had a nightmare and woke up scared or yelling - this is a completely foreign concept to you? ( if you knew it wasn't real why be scared).
    Yes I have, but it's been more like watching a scary movie (scary even though you know it's not real), or being so out of it that even blurry images are scary.

    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    Well lucid dreams can be super clear and you're thinking just like your are now, the dreams can look and feel like reality.
    That sounds cool, but it seems like the cool part is that the dreams are super clear, while being conscious doesn't have much to do with it. Why aren't they called vivid dreams instead of lucid dreams? That would be a lot easier to understand.

    Quote Originally Posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    Thoughts you are having now, the words you're reading, all your external perceptions are feed into your brain, the brain is using chemical and electrical signals and creating your conscious experience your having now - is it real?
    It's possible that I'm in the matrix, but I've never had a dream that felt a tenth of a percent as real as what I'm feeling now.
    "Don't go in there, General, it's a trap! That's a grain chamber. It makes people like you into people like me."

  8. #18
    aliphian's Avatar
    aliphian is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    California
    Posts
    432
    First, keep a dream journal that you write in immediately upon waking. Take note of feelings, sights, sounds, goings-on...

    Second, ask yourself every couple of hours, "Am I dreaming?"

    Make this a habit. Eventually you will ask yourself that question as you sleep. Once you realize you are dreaming, you are in control. Look at your hands to avoid being woken up, it keeps you connected to the dream.

    These are techniques that I've read and put to practice in my late teens early twenties. Worked for me.
    The above should be viewed as complete and utter nonsense.

  9. #19
    Jefferson1775's Avatar
    Jefferson1775 is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,895
    Quote Originally Posted by MrsToon View Post
    the website How To Trick Your Body Into Falling Asleep To Have Your First OBEs And Lucid Dreams In The Minimum Amount Of Time is an incredible resource. This guy has been testing every method for lucidity for years, and has pared it down to the most effective and useful techniques. I have used his "Stop, Drop, and Roll" technique to conk out to sleep on a regular basis, and his whole method for tricking the body into thinking the brain is asleep, has led to some really awesome "wake into lucid dream" or "WILD" experiences. I reccommend checking out his youtube vids, practice his basics, and when that works, get his other videos. Happy dreaming!

    BTW my check for dreaming is basically to see if I can float. Then it's off to fly and explore the unusual buildings. I love putting myself thru mirrors and finding out what's on the other side. Some tips to stay in a dream if things start fading out... rub your hands together quickly; spin in place until things settle down again.
    Thanks for the website. I'll check it out later this evening.

    I've been updating my dream journal and looking at my hands a lot. Last night, I felt sooo close to becoming aware. I was doing something, saw a person I know, and thought "Why isn't she doing this instead of me? She's supposed to be doing this. This isn't right." Then I woke up. Dang!
    In matters of style, swim with the current. In matters of principle, stand like a rock.

    This message has been intercepted by the NSA, the only branch of government that listens.

  10. #20
    Lewis's Avatar
    Lewis is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    2,492
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Quote Originally Posted by Jefferson1775 View Post
    Iíve had some pretty weird dreams over the years, but Iíve never realized it until after I woke up. I want to have a lucid dream (where you become aware that youíre dreaming and can control it). Iíd especially like to fly. Has anyone here ever had a lucid dream? Can you give me some tips about how to have one? Iíve read that keeping a dream journal is a good idea, but are any other techniques?
    Apparently -- LOL -- a Tibetan technique was sticking your fingers down your throat to make yourself throw up (or nearly so) as you're about to drop off !!

    That one's in one of Evans-Wentz's books, although which one escapes me at the moment:

    Amazon.com: evans-wentz: Books

    I think it was this one:

    Amazon.com: Tibetan Yoga and Secret Doctrines:Or Seven Books of Wisdom of the Great Path, According to the Late Lama Kazi Dawa-Samdup's English Rendering eBook: W. Y. Evans-Wentz, R. R. Marett, Donald S. Lopez, Donald S. Lopez Jr.: Kindle Store

    Evans-Wentz was an American who studied at Oxford University (so he did go to one of the most prestigious academies in the world). OTOH, what he really seems to have been doing is a bit of dabbling in "Tibetan Wisdom" when that was fashionable ... and, furthermore, according to how it was seen by the theosophists. The theosophists, one might say, appropriated "Eastern Wisdom", interpreting it according to their own agenda. Moreover, they de-historicized it, understanding it as a form of timeless wisdom, rather than a changeable and historically-conditioned thing, as scholars would now. Evans-Wentz also seems actually to have spent little time in Tibet (most of his photos of gurus were taken in India) and to have, embarrassingly, lacked the necessary linguistic skills, primarily relying on dodgy translations by a dipsomaniac Indian whose Tibetan was, if better than Evans-Wentz's, fairly poor.

    Still Evans-Wentz records the fingers-down-the-throat method, and I think it has the ring of truth to it. I'll bet people did that.

    I guess the interesting times are (a) when you're dropping off and (b) when you're waking up -- in the scientific jargon " hypnagogic and hypnopompic states":

    Hypnagogia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    There you're in a kind of in-between state. I think the making sure you don't quite drop off is an attempt stay there. I'd think it works ... for whatever that's worth. (Sleep deprivation would probably do it, too, though I'd not advise that either.)



    However, as a Westerner, I find it hard to see that as "spiritual" (difficult word). But, to be sure, some interesting psychological things might happen. Something might come out of bringing sleeping and waking consciousness together.

    But ... sticking your fingers down your throat as you're trying to drop off ... ?

    That's not "religion" to me. It's a technique.

    As a "Westerner" -- though this one comes from the Middle East -- I have this uneasy feeling that "religion" actually means something like this:

    Our Lord Jesus Christ said:
    The first commandment is this:
    'Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God is the only Lord.
    You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart,
    with all your soul, with all your mind,
    and with all your strength.'

    The second is this: 'Love your neighbour as yourself.'
    There is no other commandment greater than these.
    On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.
    I'm not claiming to do that -- merely saying that thoughts like that creep up on me and knock on the door when I read about religious "techniques".

    The West has its mystics, too:

    The Showings of Julian of Norwich (Norton Critical Editions): Julian of Norwich, Denise N. Baker: 9780393979152: Amazon.com: Books

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •