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  1. #11
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    you do realize strength training assists with overall body joint/muscle strength, your mind/muscle connection, to name a few not so obvious ones...and is just part of being a healthy male in general? (or female for that matter).

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockrunner View Post
    How strong is strong enough?
    Yeah, it's subjective, but I'd say you should be able to do 30-50 push ups and squats, 5-10 pullups, 2 minute plank...these bodyweight moves mean you have a modicum of functional strength, decent core strength, and can manage doing physical work (digging, lifting, etc.) . I've gotten a lot stronger doing bodyweight training and it feels great. I can keep up with the kids, among other things...

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    Quote Originally Posted by dabears View Post
    you do realize strength training assists with overall body joint/muscle strength, your mind/muscle connection, to name a few not so obvious ones...and is just part of being a healthy male in general? (or female for that matter).
    But hey if your rock climbing and rowing in some white water your getting plenty of that without a regimented "strength day" at the gym. Kinda like Movnat.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    You should add in some basic strength building stuff like squats and deadlifts and some explosive stuff like power cleans or whatever. You'll feel a lot more bouncy and fast and the actual effort of running will start to feel easier than it used to. You'll also need to do far less running to be a decent runner. You'll be able to accomplish in 30 minutes a few times a week what it takes you hours to accomplish running all the time.
    I'm a decent runner no matter what I do...I'm just looking for things others here use as bench marks for minimum strength training...I know I need to improve in that area but how much time do I need to dedicate to weight training is the real question for me.

    In running there is a sweet spot around 15 - 25 miles a week that you get the most health benefit for your time...where is that for strength training?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    But hey if your rock climbing and rowing in some white water your getting plenty of that without a regimented "strength day" at the gym. Kinda like Movnat.
    fully understood, and there are a lot more ways to get generally stronger than without a barbell... I've had the discussion on here before. But I still think it is generally speaking the best and most progressive way to add strength, and would only help complement those activities.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockrunner View Post
    I'm a decent runner no matter what I do...I'm just looking for things others here use as bench marks for minimum strength training...I know I need to improve in that area but how much time do I need to dedicate to weight training is the real question for me.

    In running there is a sweet spot around 15 - 25 miles a week that you get the most health benefit for your time...where is that for strength training?
    it changes as you adapt... but at the beginning I would suggest a starting strength routine similar to:

    3x a week
    about 30-45 minutes a session

    Workout A
    Squats 5x5
    Bench Press 5x5
    Bent Over Row 5x5

    Workout B
    Squats 5x5
    Deadlift 1x5
    Overhead Press 5x5

    One week do ABA (mon/wed/fri for example), next week do BAB.

    To me that is pretty close to bare minimum requirements to grow at an effective and efficient pace.

    Another routine example for bare minimums would be Jim Wendlers 5/3/1 (google)...

    5/3/1 Squats
    5/3/1 Deadlift
    5/3/1 Bench Press

    That is one of the most basic routines that is still an effective strength gainer.

  7. #17
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    Strength is relative to body-weight. The basics should be an ability to do calisthenics and climb, lift and bear moderate (realistic) weights...etc Imagine you need to be strong enough to climb trees and rock-faces, carry your child, take dinner home, move camp, sprint on occasion and push moderately heavy things off yourself. That's a basic level of human strength, a-la-"wild-human".
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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    I guess your an endurance athlete or something then? You could practice HIT 1-2x/week and be all set. Check out Body by Science.
    My only short <10 minute machine weight training I do now is a "Big 2 Body by Science" upper body only workout which works great for maintaining some beginner strength.

  9. #19
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    If you are lifting barbells, strstd.com is a great benchmark for you current strength levels.

    This is a great description of barbell based strength levels (mark has a bodyweight specific one in the PBF pdf as well)
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Within two years of consistent training on a decent routine, the average male should be able to progress to the following levels of strength (1RM):

    Strength Goals: Intermediate

    Bench press: body weight x 1.2

    Chin-ups or pull-ups: body weight x 1.2 or 8 reps with body weight.

    Squat: body weight x 1.6

    Deadlift: body weight x 2

    These numbers are for a raw (no straps, belt or knee wraps) single repetition.

    The progress towards the intermediate strength goals should be fairly linear, meaning that there should be no plateaus that cannot be solved in an uncomplicated manner. By "consistent" training I do not mean never missing a training day, nor do I consider taking 2-3 months off from training consistent.

    By "decent training routine", I mean "not doing blatantly stupid shit" (training 5-6 days/week, 20-25 sets for chest and arms, etc.). I do not mean optimal and flawless.


    Strength Goals: Advanced

    Under the exact same conditions as the previous example, 3 out of 4 of the following goals should be reached within five years, along with all of the strength goals listed under "intermediate":

    Bench press: body weight x 1.5

    Chin-ups or pull-ups: body weight x 1.5 or 15 reps with body weight.

    Squat: body weight x 2

    Deadlift: body weight x 2.5


    Strength Goals: Highly Advanced

    Under the exact same conditions, all of the following goals should be reached within ten years. Alternatively, 3 out of 4 should be reached, and one should be "Elite":

    Bench press: body weight x 1.5, or x 1.8 (elite)

    Chin-ups or pull-ups: body weight x 1.5 or 15 reps with body weight, or x 1.8 / 20 reps (elite)

    Squat: body weight x 2, or x 2.4 (elite)

    Deadlift: body weight x 2.5, or x 3 (elite)

    "Elite" denotes one lift that is often ahead of the others. For example, people who are natural pullers (long arms) may very well hit a 3 x body weight deadlift before a 1.5 x body weight bench, and vice versa for the presser (short arms, stocky and barrel-chested) benching 1.8 x body weight but not being able to pull 2.5 x body weight in the deadlift.

    The highly advanced strength goals falls in line with what could be considered the pinnacle of physique and strength development for most average and natural trainers. At this point, progress is very slow.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockrunner View Post
    How strong is strong enough?

    There are different body types and a wide spectrum of opinions out there...so what do you say is the minimum amount of strength that should be attained? I have a skinny runner type body so hi strength is way out there for me but there must be a "best bang for the buck" efficiency for training time vs strength.
    The question is: strong enough for what? For watching TV? You're already strong enough. For doing basic physical activity? Also strong enough. For playing a sport? For working construction? For...? You get the idea.

    In my opinion, a good level of strength for a person not involved in strength sports is approximately at or near the point of the intermediate phase of lifting. The novice phase, the one prior to the intermediate phase, is when you can eat, sleep, lift, and make progress every time you do it. When you're still eating, sleeping, and lifting, and you cannot progress every workout, then you're "strong enough" in my mind. This level depends on your gender, age, proportions, genetics, etc.

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